Ohio teen threatens to shoot federal agents, Planned Parenthood: Police

Ohio teen threatens to shoot federal agents, Planned Parenthood: Police

first_imgMahoning County Sheriffs Office(BOARDMAN, Ohio) — An Ohio teenager threatened to shoot federal agents, a Planned Parenthood and a gay bar and was found at a residence that had a gun vault and around 10,000 rounds of ammunition, according to police and court documents.Justin Olsen, 18, was the moderator of an online chat where he made light of mass shootings and made the threats against all federal agents, the nonprofit, and an undisclosed gay bar, according to a police report from the Boardman Police Department. After searching his father’s house in Boardman, a suburb south of Youngstown, FBI agents seized 15 rifles and 10 semi-automatic pistols, according to a criminal complaint. Investigators also observed an estimated 10,000 rounds of ammunition in one room and another 300 rounds of ammunition on the stairway leading to the second floor, according to the complaint.ABC News could not immediately confirm who owned them, or if they were legally purchased.When Olsen turned 18 in May, he boasted in a post that he couldn’t “wait to start stockpiling weapons,” according to the police report.He also wrote that he was planning on buying an AR-15 parts kit after posting a photo of it, the police report said.The case began in February, when the FBI received a complaint about Olsen in Anchorage, Alaska, and traced his computer information back to Olsen’s address.On Aug. 6, an FBI agent approached a Boardman police detective with the information and “in light of the recent mass shootings in the United States,” officials decided to arrest him. He was taken into custody the next day at his father’s residence.In the span of a week ahead of Olsen’s arrest, 34 people were killed in three recent but separate mass shootings in El Paso, Texas (Aug. 3); Dayton, Ohio (Aug. 4); and Gilroy, California (July 28).Olsen, who is charged with aggravated menacing, admitted to making the threats, according to police, but said it was all a joke and for fun.He is currently being held at the Mahoning County Jail. It was not immediately clear if he had legal representation. Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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4 skiers dead after avalanche in Utah’s Salt Lake Valley

first_imgAdventure_Photo/iStockBy MEREDITH DELISO, ABC News(SALT LAKE CITY) — Four skiers are dead after an avalanche Saturday in Utah’s Salt Lake Valley, authorities said.The avalanche occurred in a backcountry region of Millcreek Canyon. Eight skiers were in the area of Wilson Basin, which is not affiliated with any ski resorts, when they triggered the avalanche, Sgt. Melody Cutler of Millcreek’s Unified Police Department said.All eight were caught in the avalanche. A couple of skiers were able to dig themselves and the deceased skiers out, Cutler said.Rescue crews were notified of the avalanche at 11:40 a.m. local time. The four survivors had minor injuries and were rescued via helicopter. Rescue teams were working to bring the deceased off the mountain, Cutler said.The ages of the skiers range from early 20s to late 30s, Cutler said.The accident occurred amid warnings of high avalanche danger for the region.At 7 a.m. local time Saturday, the Forest Service Utah Avalanche Center issued a backcountry avalanche warning for the mountains of northern Utah. It remains in effect through 6 a.m. Sunday.Cutler stressed that it’s important to pay attention to those warnings.“There’s been advisories out recently about the very high avalanche danger that exists with the current conditions,” Cutler told Salt Lake City ABC affiliate KTVX. “This is a very unfortunate circumstance with these conditions.”Utah Gov. Spencer Cox reacted to news of the deadly avalanche on Twitter.“This is a terrible tragedy and our prayers go out to the victims and families involved,” he said. “We are grateful to the first responders and others who engaged in this rescue and recovery effort. With avalanche danger high right now, please exercise extreme caution.”The Salt Lake County Sheriff’s Canyon Search and Rescue Unit, Unified Police Department, Unified Fire Authority and others were involved in the response, Mayor Jenny Wilson said.“We are heartbroken over the tragic news of four fatalities as the result of an avalanche in the Millcreek Canyon area this afternoon,” Wilson tweeted. “We deeply mourn the loss of life due to this devastating incident.”This is Utah’s third fatal avalanche this year, according to the Utah Avalanche Center.Two people died last month in separate avalanches in the Salt Lake region.On Jan. 30, a 57-year-old man was killed while skiing in the backcountry adjacent to the Park City Mountain Resort’s Canyons Village. Three weeks earlier, a 31-year-old snowboarder was buried after descending a slope with another skier in the backcountry of the Canyons Village area on Jan. 8.All three avalanches were unintentionally triggered.Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Landmark temps ruling could leave employers paying the price

first_img Comments are closed. Landmark temps ruling could leave employers paying the priceOn 1 May 2003 in Personnel Today Employers are being warned to take more care over the way they treattemporary staff following a court ruling that direct dealings over time couldgive temps an implied employment contract and therefore full employee rights. The Court of Appeal ruling in Franks v (1) Reuters Limited (2) First ResortEmployment Limited could expose firms to employment claims from temps, andpossibly also from contractors working through personal service companies. Franks worked for several years at Reuters as a temp driver and helpdeskoperator. When his assignment ended, he claimed unfair dismissal, redundancypay and breach of contract against Reuters. The Court of Appeal said it was possible he could have a claim if, onconsideration of all the relevant evidence (including what was said and done,as well as any relevant documents), there was an implied contract betweenFranks and Reuters. It said relevant factors could be that Franks had been allowed to stayworking in the same place for several years, during which time he wasredeployed, and effectively treated as a member of the end-user’s workforce. “Therefore dealings between parties over a period of years, as distinctfrom the weeks or months typical of temporary or casual work, are capable ofgenerating an implied contractual relationship,” said Kevin Barrows,partner at Tarlo Lyons. To avoid a similar situation, Barrow advised: “Channel all dealingswith contractors through the staffing company. Do not move temps andcontractors from job to job within your organisation, and do not allow themaccess to general employee benefits, do not, for example, fill in theirmortgage application forms.” Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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The effects of experimental temperature elevation on populations of cryptostigmatic mites in high Arctic soils

first_imgSoil warming experiments were conducted in tundra heath and polar semi-desert soils at the High Arctic location of Ny-Alesund, West Spitsbergen, Svalbard, The warming treatment resulted in an 8-10% increase in the annual thermal budget for soil-dwelling oribatid mites (Crytptostigmata). Samples of the oribatid mite populations were taken during three summers using high gradient extractors, from warmed and control plots. Changes in population density were analysed for six species of oribatid mite. The oribatid mite fauna of these soils is well adapted to a wide temperature range and responds to short-term changes in the soil microclimate. there was little evidence from this three-year experiment that persistent above normal temperatures affected population growth rates.last_img read more

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Geographic isolation and physiological mechanisms underpinning species distributions at the range limit hotspot of South Georgia

first_imgIn order to allocate quotas for sustainable harvests, that account for climate warming, it is important to incorporate species vulnerabilities that will underlie likely changes in population dynamics. Hotspots, regions with rapidly changing climate, are important locations for rapid advances in mechanistic understanding of the factors driving these changes, particularly if they coincide with regions with a high incidence of range limits, such as the sub-Antarctic Island of South Georgia. This archipelago is at the Northern limit of the Southern Ocean and therefore the northern distribution limit for many Southern Ocean shallow water marine species, which are amongst the most sensitive fauna to increasing temperature. At range limits species may either be living close to their physiological limits, or they may have more resistant phenotypes. In case studies, the northern range limit population of the gastropod limpet, Nacella concinna, has greater physiological plasticity at South Georgia than those from further south, allowing them to cope better with the warmer and more variable seasonal temperatures. Bivalve species, however, alter their depth distributions at South Georgia, to avoid the warmer water masses, indicating that they may not be able to cope with the warmer temperatures. Mackerel icefish, Champsocephalus gunnari, has a unique Antarctic trait, the loss of haemoglobin. A combination of temperature driven change in food web structure, and this extreme physiological cold adaptation, may explain why rapid warming at its northern range limit of South Georgia, has prevented stocks fully recovering from over fishing in the 1980s, despite highly conservative management strategies.last_img read more

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Precipitation pathways for five new ice core sites in Ellsworth Land, West Antarctica

first_imgIce cores provide a wealth of information about past climate and atmospheric circulation however a good understanding of the precipitation patterns, potential source regions and transport pathways is essential in their interpretation. Here we investigate the precipitation pathways for a transect of five new ice cores drilled in the southern Antarctic Peninsula and Ellsworth Land. We utilize in situ observations from automatic weather stations to confirm that the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts ERA-Interim reanalysis data adequately captures annual and sub-annual variability, with evidence of a slight cold bias in the 2 m temperatures. Back trajectory analysis, from the British Atmospheric Data Centre trajectory service, reveals that warm and snowy years are associated with air masses that originate (5 days before reaching the site) from the Amundsen-Bellingshausen Sea, while cold and dry years are associated with air masses from the Antarctic continent. There is a clear seasonal migration in the trajectories at each site, reflecting the east to west migration of the Amundsen Sea Low, known to have a strong influence on climate in this region.last_img read more

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Employee’s theft nearly bankrupts bakery

first_imgFuller’s Quality Bakers in Yorkshire was nearly bankrputed by an employee, who stole almost £12,000, a court has found.Beverley Peniston admitted four charges of theft between July 2007 and December 2008 at Hull Crown Court, which heard she began working for the company in 1999, receiving cash from its nine retail outlets in the area and checking the amounts against till receipts.Owner George Fuller noticed the business was becoming less profitable and had been injecting cash from his personal savings account. He discovered Peniston had been entering lower figures and pocketing the difference on 57 different occasions, and estimated he would have been bankrupt by mid-2009 if the thefts had not been detected.Peniston admitted taking the cash, but said she did not know why she had taken it or what she had spent the money on.The honorary recorder of Hull and the East Riding, Judge Michael Mettyear, adjourned the case to allow Peniston to repay the full amount to the business. Peniston, of Pasture Road, Goole, was given a six-month sentence, suspended for 18 months, and made subject of a non-monitored curfew between 11pm and 7am for three months.last_img read more

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Statement to Parliament: Oral Statement: Northern Ireland Finances

first_img Last week I laid a written statement in which I explained that the pressures on public services meant that it was imperative for the Government to take steps to provide clarity to enable planning in Northern Ireland for 2018/19. I would welcome the views and proposals of the Northern Ireland parties and others on how such arrangements – providing for local decision-making and scrutiny, on a cross-community basis – might be achieved in the continued absence of an Executive. And how any such arrangements might work alongside the other institutions of the Agreement. As well as cutting costs, securing efficiencies and beginning to take the steps to transform public services, it is right to look at how income can be increased to protect the public services on which the people of Northern Ireland depend. So, I will introduce legislation to set a regional rate – which will increase domestic rates by 3% above inflation. This will make an important contribution to sustainable finances in the long-run – with the additional funding addressing urgent pressures in health and education. With great reluctance and in spite of my strong preference for a new Executive to set a budget, I set out in this statement the resource and capital allocations which I considered to be the most balanced and appropriate settlement for Northern Ireland departments. We will continue to support and facilitate North/South co-operation – including as we leave the EU, while always preserving the economic integrity of the United Kingdom. But, second, we will take those decisions which are necessary to provide good governance and political stability for Northern Ireland – consistent always with restoring the Executive and local decision-making at the earliest possible opportunity. We believe in devolution, and the imperative for local decision making, by local politicians. We will uphold the principle of consent, consistent with this Government’s support for Northern Ireland’s place within the Union and with maintaining the constitutional integrity of the United Kingdom. My powers as Secretary of State for Northern Ireland are limited. The scope of this House to pass legislation on the devolved issues which matter for Northern Ireland is limited. This rightly reflects the devolution settlement which is in place and to which this Government is committed. But it does mean that, in the continuing absence of an Executive, there are fundamental decisions in Northern Ireland which cannot be taken, scrutinised and implemented as they should be. I did this following intensive engagement with Northern Ireland Civil Service (NICS) and consultation with all of the main Northern Ireland parties. The principles at the core of the Agreement, and the political institutions that it establishes, continue to have our full and unreserved support. We support power-sharing on a cross-community basis, based on mutual respect and recognition. First, we remain steadfast in our commitment to the Belfast Agreement. All that we do will be with the purpose of protecting and fulfilling the Agreement. That means that … These measures – which I take reluctantly, but which are necessary in the absence of a functioning Executive and Assembly – will deliver the stability and the decisions to enable forward planning for the financial year ahead. But I am clear that they cannot provide the local input and fundamental decisions which are needed to secure a more sustainable future for Northern Ireland. Third, we will continue to implement our obligations under the Agreement and its successors where possible – always working for the good of the community as a whole. I also intend to act to extend the cost-capping of the current renewable heat incentive scheme in Northern Ireland, which the Assembly had put in place over a year ago.center_img Finally, we will continue to work with all the Northern Ireland parties – and with the Irish Government as appropriate – to remove the barriers to restoring the Executive and a fully functioning Assembly. Mr Speaker, the necessary steps which I have taken and will continue to take are consistent with all of these commitments. And we will continue to act fairly and govern in the interests of all parts of the community in Northern Ireland; As the 20th anniversary of the Belfast Agreement approaches, I am clearer than ever that Northern Ireland needs strong political leadership from a locally elected and accountable devolved Government. That remains my firm goal. I also believe that the time is right to address the ongoing public concern about MLA pay in the absence of a functioning Assembly. I thank Trevor Reaney who was instructed by my predecessor to produce an independent view and recommended a 27.5% reduction to MLA pay. I will seek to introduce legislation to take a power to vary MLA pay. Further to that, I am minded to reduce pay in line with the Reaney Review recommendation, but I would welcome full and final representations from the NI parties before I make a final decision. With permission Mr Speaker I would like to make a statement about Northern Ireland finances. And I will also confirm the final spending totals for the Northern Ireland departments for the 2017-18 financial year in legislation to set Supplementary Estimates. We will continue to work closely with the Irish Government in full accordance with the three stranded approach. This approach is based on a number of principles… Mr Speaker, in the continued absence of an Executive, I have an obligation to take these and any other measures that are necessary to keep Northern Ireland functioning. But I will only take such measures where they are essential and limited in nature, and are part of a clear and consistent approach by the Government. This has been the situation for 14 months already and, in the continued absence of an Executive, it would be irresponsible for us not to consider how we might provide for different arrangements until such time as the devolved institutions are back up and running. Alongside this I also continue to keep under review my statutory obligation to call an Assembly Election. It would not be acceptable to put finances at risk by simply allowing that cap to lapse. I therefore propose to extend it for a further year from 1 April – the minimal possible step to protect the public purse. In addition to the steps I set out last week, there are several associated measures required to further secure public finances which I will be taking forward . . . Let me be clear that this is no way affects my commitment to the Belfast Agreement nor my commitment to continue to work to remove the barriers to the restoration of devolution. I commend this statement to the House.last_img read more

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AB Mauri given AA accreditation in BRC audit

first_imgAB Mauri has secured AA accreditation in its latest British Retail Consortium audit.AA accreditation was awarded to all three of AB Mauri’s bakery ingredient manufacturing sites and to its yeast plant in Hull. This maintains the highest level of accreditation, which was originally awarded to the business in December last year.The British Retail Consortium BRC Global Standard has been developed by food industry experts and is designed to provide a framework to manage product safety, integrity, legality and quality.“This is a clear reflection of the processes and procedures we have worked hard to implement into the day-to-day culture of our business and testament to the combined effort of our all employees,” said AB Mauri managing director Andrew Pollard (pictured above).AB Mauri UK & Ireland – which was formed from the merger of Cereform, Mauri Products and Gb Plange UK – provides a range of bakery ingredients and yeast products to bakers in the UK and Ireland.For more on AB Mauri’s yeast production activity, British Baker subscribers can download and read our annual Yeast category report.last_img read more

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Ceili dance team wins championship

first_imgThe Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s ceili team stepped on stage to compete with Irish step dancers from all over the world at the All-Ireland Championsips in Belfast last week. Senior coach Connor Reider said the team performed their final dance, called the Cross Reel, flawlessly. “It was beautiful because it was more than just a dance,” Reider said. “It was our hard work, our coordination, all the fun we had at the practices and performances. It was all worth it, and it was perfect.” Reider said the team performed their second dance in the set, called, “Trip to the Cottage,” earlier that day. Their exceptional performance in both numbers won them the All-Ireland Championships for the third consecutive year, he said. The competition features teams from across the world. “There was such a sense of pride because you achieved something for your school,” Reider said. “It was special bringing Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s to the world.” Senior and co-president of the ceili team Kelly McGovern said eight Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s students from the Irish Dance Club traveled together to Belfast, Ireland after nine months of preparation for the competition. McGovern said competition day was one of the best days of her life. “We were all doing each other’s hair and taking pictures,” McGovern said. “When we went to the venue, they were running way ahead of schedule and it ended up being kind of rushed. We didn’t have time to get stressed, and then we just went on and danced. The way we danced, no one was worried, and everyone was just like, ‘Let’s show them what we can do.’” “Everything just worked. We hit every line. It was my last competition ever and it was so great. It’s always better with your friends,” McGovern said. Reider said the friendships among the team members were integral to their success. “It was so rewarding because out of it we all got nine new friends. Nine friendships were solidified,” Reider said. “I was up in the balcony watching [the second dance], and six of the girls are seniors and this was going to be the last time on the stage competing, The first number was great, but as they were dancing this second number, I teared up.” Sophomore Katy Wahl said the moment the team discovered they won was “joyous.” “We had done it together and we accomplished what we set out to do,” Wahl said. “Winning with new nine brand new friends who had never danced with each other was awesome.” Tara Macleod, associate teaching professor in the department of Irish Language and Literature and faculty advisor to the club, traveled with the ceili team to Belfast. She said the team’s focus on competition helped them acheive success. “They went to compete. They were extremely focused,” Macleod said. “They were wonderful ambassadors for the University. It was obvious on stage the long days and nights paid off. “I was a bundle of nerves when they were dancing,” Macleod said. “As soon as it was over, I felt that I saw something special. It was electrifying. I only met the team the Sunday before they left, but it was obvious at that point that they were such a team. I’ve never seen such cohesiveness. They all support one another and it was quite impressive to watch.” Senior Grace Deardruff said the ceili team held tryouts last February that included dancing in front of a panel of four judges, who evaluated each dancer’s stamina and ability to dance in a group. “Usually the team is very laid back, and then suddenly the ‘Irish dance competitive’ side comes out in people and it’s very intense,” Deardruff said. “I was very honored to make the cut because everyone really wanted it. Hearing I was going [to Ireland] was one of the happiest moments of second semester last year.” Contact Katie McCarty at [email protected]last_img read more

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