New Festival, The Big Weekend, Announces Umphrey’s McGee, Lettuce, & More For Inaugural Lineup

New Festival, The Big Weekend, Announces Umphrey’s McGee, Lettuce, & More For Inaugural Lineup

first_imgToday, new festival The Big Weekend has announced the lineup for their 2018 event, set to take place in Chicago, Illinois, from October 4th to October 6th. The new event, presented by Silver Wrapper, Live Nation, and JAM Productions, will feature three nights of music across five Chicago venues.Following the model of a city takeover, the inaugural festival will feature performances from Umphrey’s McGee, Lettuce, Emancipator Ensemble, Leftover Salmon, Papadosio, The Motet, Spafford, The Revolution, The Russ Liquid Test, SunSquabi, and more. Early and late performances allow for multiple-venue visits, and evening and afternoon surprises with artists are also in the works. Watch The Big Weekend announcement video below:[Video: The Big Weekend]Tickets are on sale this Friday, June 8th, at 10 am (CT). CID Entertainment is offering a Big Weekend VIP Experience that bundles a ticket to a Friday and Saturday night’s concerts with premium access at each show. For fans seeking a weekend getaway, travel packages including hotel reservations at Cambria Chicago. Big Weekend Experience & Travel Package details are available here.Chicago has a long history with the jam scene, from hosting the final Grateful Dead show in ’95 to the monumental Fare Thee Well performances in 2015, on the Grateful Dead’s 50th anniversary. It’s only fitting that hometown favorites Umphrey’s McGee are anchoring the first of what will be an annual event.As Michael Berg of Silver Wrapper Presents notes,When the idea of bringing The Big Weekend concept to Chicago came to us, we loved it. Previously, we had used a similar concert series model on events such as the Chicago Bluegrass and Blues series, so we knew it could work. The music of the extended jam scene is at the heart of the Silver Wrapper concert community, so we’re especially excited to see this one come to life and start a new fall music tradition in Chicago.For more information, head to The Big Weekend’s website.last_img read more

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EXCLUSIVE: Get Stoked For STS9’s Wave Spell Live Fest With Late Night Radio’s Handpicked Promo Playlist

first_imgSTS9 – “Possibilities” Remix (Collective Efforts): OG track with a great remix, not much more to say…Michal Menert – “Moonswell”: Michal was the closest thing to a musical mentor I had coming up, so I gotta show some love to the godfather.Daily Bread – “A Long Way From Home”: Rhett [Whatley] is a beast, and all his music is amazing. I chose this track because I feel like it really captures his bluesy, hip-hop vibe.Prefuse 73 – “Natures Uplifting Revenge”: I’ve been bumping this track for almost ten years now, and I’m super stoked to be on a bill with Prefuse 73Manic Focus – “Stronger” featuring Late Night Radio, Jenifer Hartswick, & Adam Deitch: [John “JmaC” McCarten] has been a friend for quite some time, and we had a lot of fun making “Stronger” with him in Chicago. I feel like this track really highlights both of our styles, and we got the homie Adam Deitch on some drums as well.Sunsquabi – “Cinnamon” featuring Late Night Radio: SunSquabi is absolutely killing it lately, and it’s always a blast for us to play tunes together so, once again, gotta show love for the homies.Chris Karns – “We Don’t Stop”: I went with this track to showcase how much of a beast Chris is on both production and cuts. From August 16th to 19th, STS9 will host their inaugural Wave Spell Live Festival in Belden Town, California. Featuring nine sets from the host band, Wave Spell Live will also see a headlining set from BAAD Quartet, a supergroup composed of Dom Lalli (Big Gigantic), Alana Rocklin (STS9), Adam Deitch (Lettuce/Break Science), and Borahm Lee (Pretty Lights Live/Break Science). The festival will also host sets from David Phipps (solo), Zach Velmer, eDIT (Glitch Mob), Ooah (Glitch Mob), SunSquabi (two nights), Manic Focus, Charlesthefirst (two nights), Michal Menert, Antennae, Maddy O’Neal (two nights), Yak Attack (two nights), An-Ten-Nae, Chris Karns (Pretty Lights Live), and many more, in addition to stand-up comedy about STS9 and the jam band scene by NY-based comedy team Wokes with Jokes.Tickets are still available but flying fast. To secure your tickets to the highly anticipated debut festival, head to Wave Spell Live’s website here. Since June, fans have been eagerly awaiting Wave Spell Live, a brand-new music festival from the jamtronica juggernauts of STS9. Slated for August 16th through 19th, the festival sets itself apart with its heavy-hitting, electronic-focused lineup and absolutely wild venue. Wave Spell Live will take place in Belden Town, California, a town with a population of seven, and for the event, the festival will rent out the town—meaning the town’s residents will leave and there will be absolutely no noise ordinances or curfews.In addition to nine sets from STS9, Wave Spell Live has tapped an enviable list of performers, including Colorado’s Late Night Radio, an up-and-coming producer named Alex Medellin who has been earning high praise from other artists and fans alike. With an emphasis on musical experimentation mixed with meticulous production, Late Night Radio has been rising on the bill of renowned music festivals and embarking on nationwide headlining tours of his own.In anticipation of Late Night Radio’s performance at Wave Spell Live, Medellin curated a hype-worthy playlist to get fans stoked on the upcoming California festival. As he told Live For Live Music, “Really excited to be joining a bunch of friends for STS9’s Wave Spell festival at Belden Town. Shout out to STS9 for putting together this epic lineup.”Late Night Radio’s handpicked playlist features other artists he’ll be sharing the Wave Spell Live lineup with, including remixes of teh host band STS9, plus fan-favorites like Michal Menert, Daily Bread, Prefuse 73, Manic Focus, SunSquabi, and Chris Karns. You can check out the Spotify playlist and his reasoning behind each selection below.last_img read more

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Phil Lesh & The Terrapin Family Band Welcome Eric Krasno, Nicki Bluhm In New York’s Central Park [Photos/Full Video]

first_imgLoad remaining images On Wednesday night, Phil Lesh began a run of Northeast shows at New York’s Central Park SummerStage. In addition to his touring outfit, The Terrapin Family Band, which features Phil’s son and guitarist Grahame Lesh, drummer Alex Koford, guitarist Ross James, and keyboardist Jason Crosby, Phil recruited guitarist Eric Krasno and vocalist Nicki Bluhm for the Central Park performance.The band kicked off the show with a New York-appropriate cover, The Velvet Underground‘s “Sweet Jane”. Next, the band jumped into a cover of Smokey Robinson and the Miracles classic “I Second That Emotion” with Krasno and Bluhm sharing vocal duties. This song has gotten a lot of play from Krasno in the past few weeks in a broad spectrum of settings. Two weekends ago, Krasno performed the song as part of a tribute to Jerry Garcia Band with Lettuce, John Mayer, Bob Weir, and more. Last weekend, he turned in an unplugged version of the song at his intimate Rockwood Music Hall performance.The band continued to spread the vocals around with live Dead favorites like “He’s Gone”, “New Minglewood Blues”, “Brown-Eyed Women”, and “Peggy-O”. “Alligator” was up next, and featured some exploratory improvisation that flirted with the Allman Brothers Band‘s “Blue Sky” before landing in a smoking Nicki Bluhm-sung “Deal” to cap set one.Following a lengthy set break and a meandering intro jam, set two commenced with a delicate “Bird Song” sung by Phil, who milked an extended, tension-building pause amidst the song’s final “I’ll show you/Snow and rain” refrain for added emotional effect. “Truckin’” came next, with Grahame Lesh leading the way on vocals and adding an impressive guitar solo to its closing jam. A highlight of the show, Grahame manned the Dead’s classic on-the-road opus like he was born to play it.An excellent rendition of “Unbroken Chain” followed, featuring a big piano solo from Crosby and a Jimi Hendrix-like solo from Krasno. Visibly delighted by Krasno’s fireworks, a smiling Phil gave some visibly astounded love to the guitarist before beginning “The Wheel”. After covering a little ground on the sing-along favorite (including some teases of The Beatles‘ “Come Together” by Krasno), the band slid into a funky “West L.A. Fadeaway”. Krasno once again took a stellar solo on the “Sugar Magnolia” that followed and continued the trend with a high-energy “Scarlet Begonias”.As “Scarlet” slipped into “Fire on the Mountain”, Bluhm once again took the reins, delivering a stunning vocal performance on the second half of the classic pairing. Finally, Ross James led the way on a fuzz-rock rendition of Bob Dylan‘s “A Hard Rain’s A-Gonna Fall”, his unhinged vocals and wailing guitar highlighting the set-closing number. When Phil returned to the stage for an encore, he thanked the NYC crowd for bringing the absolute best out of the band—as always—before Bluhm led the way on a heartbreakingly soulful reading of “Brokedown Palace”.Phil Lesh’s New York run continues tonight with a sold-out performance at The Capitol Theatre (click here for a webcast of the show). On Friday, Phil will head to Harlem’s iconic Apollo Theater for a HeadCount benefit with some “very special friends” including the Terrapin Family Band, Bluhm, Krasno, Robert Randolph, Talib Kweli, and the Harlem Gospel Choir.For a full list of Phil Lesh’s upcoming tour dates, head to his website here.You can view a gallery of photos from the performance below via photographer Andrew O’Brien, and watch full crowd-shot footage of the performance below via taper Zman (Steven J. Ziegler):Phil Lesh & The Terrapin Family Band w/ Eric Krasno & Nicki Bluhm – 9/5/18 – Set 1Phil Lesh & The Terrapin Family Band w/ Eric Krasno & Nicki Bluhm – 9/5/18 – Set 1Setlist: Phil Lesh & The Terrapin Family Band w/ Eric Krasno & Nicki Bluhm | Central Park SummerStage | New York, NY | 9/5/2018Set One: Sweet Jane, I Second That Emotion, He’s Gone, New Minglewood Blues, Brown-Eyed Women, Peggy-O, Alligator* > DealSet Two: Bird Song > Truckin’, Unbroken Chain > The Wheel > West L.A. Fadeaway, Sugar Magnolia > Scarlet Begonias > Fire on the Mountain, A Hard Rain’s A-Gonna FallEncore: Brokedown Palace*Contained Allman Brothers “Blue Sky” teasePhil Lesh & The Terrapin Family Band w/ Nicki Bluhm & Eric Krasno | Central Park SummerStage | New York, NY | 9/5/2018 | Photo: Andrew O’Breinlast_img read more

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Lotus Releases New “Faceblind” Music Video [Watch]

first_imgIn early December of last year, jamtronica favorites Lotus released a brand new album Frames Per Second, their first studio release since 2016’s Eat the Light. Frames Per Second is a sprawling, 19-track release comprised of a mix of never-before-heard material and songs the band had been introducing and road-testing since the release of Eat The Light (like “Cold Facts”, “Bug Love”, “Faceblind”, “Cosmosis”, “Forgotten Name”, “Gifford’s Airship”, “Jiggle”, “Pachyderm”, and “And yet They Fight”).Along with the album itself, Lotus released a studio documentary chronicling the recording of Frames Per Second at Rittenhouse Soundworks in Philadelphia. The documentary showcases Lotus performing and recording live in the studio.Today, Lotus has shared a new music video for their groovy and untzy tune “Faceblind”, highlighted by footage compiled from the band’s recent Frames Per Second recording session. Watch Lotus’ new “Faceblind” music video below:Lotus – “Faceblind”[Video: Lotus]In April, Lotus will head out on a run of tour dates in support of Frames Per Second. That 8-date jaunt will culminate in a headlining blowout at Morrison, CO’s iconic Red Rocks Amphitheatre. The five-piece band consisting of Mike Greenfield (drums), Jesse Miller (bass, sampler), Luke Miller (guitar, keys), Mike Rempel (guitar), and Chuck Morris (percussion) has tapped an impressive support lineup for their Red Rocks bash including experimental electronic duo Ghostland Observatory, Denver-native electronic producer Jade Cicada, and Colorado’s own jam favorites Magic Beans.Prior to Lotus’ Red Rocks Amphitheatre show, the band looks forward to throwing down a three-night stand in Brooklyn, NY (4/4, 4/5, 4/6); Harrisburg, PA’s Club XL (4/18); a two-night stint in Washington, D.C. (4/19, 4/20); and an intimate show at Denver’s Summit. The quintet will also make summer festival appearances at Stephentown, NY’s Disc Jam Music Festival and The Peach Music Festival in Scranton, PA.Head here for ticketing and more information.last_img read more

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President Faust in Africa

first_imgGABORONE, Botswana — Harvard President Drew Faust saw firsthand how Harvard is helping the African nation of Botswana to fight AIDS, when she toured facilities on Wednesday (Nov. 25) in two communities where a Harvard-Botswana partnership is operating anti-AIDS programs.Faust met with young Harvard-trained researchers in a state-of-the-art laboratory built and operated by the Botswana-Harvard Partnership for HIV Research and Education (BHP), a novel collaboration between the Harvard School of Public Health’s AIDS Initiative (HAI) and the government of Botswana.Botswana’s anti-AIDS programs are considered models of how to fight the disease, although the nation remains among those hit hardest by AIDS.Botswana is an early stop on Faust’s trip to southern Africa. She also will visit Johannesburg and Cape Town in South Africa. She is scheduled to give a speech at the University of Johannesburg on Thursday (Nov. 26).Faust arrived in Botswana’s capital, Gaborone, early in the morning and drove to the village of Mochudi, where she met with Max Essex, Mary Woodard Lasker Professor of Health Sciences and chair of the Harvard School of Public Health AIDS Initiative. Essex showed Faust several projects under way at Mochudi Hospital. Among them is a successful effort to determine the best drug regimen to prevent transmission of HIV from breastfeeding mothers to their nursing children.Faust also visited the BHP laboratory in Gaborone, talking with young researchers who trained at Harvard. She met later with Botswana’s minister of health to discuss Harvard’s continuing commitment to Botswana, and with the University of Botswana’s vice chancellor to review the current undergraduate exchange program and to explore new collaborations. The day ended with a reception attended by two former presidents of Botswana and other government officials from the United States and Africa.last_img read more

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Reading and study strategies course open for registration

first_imgRegistration is open for the Bureau of Study Counsel’s 14-day reading course. The fee is $150.Through readings, films, and classroom exercises, students learn to read more purposefully, selectively, and with greater speed and comprehension. The hourlong classes will be held Monday-Friday, June 28-July 16, at 5 Linden St.Register in person at the bureau, or call 617.495.2581.last_img

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A look inside: Kirkland House

first_img Conversation starter Kirkland House’s resident scholar, Peter V. Emerson, the mastermind behind the popular series “Conversations with Kirkland,” also introduced the event. Conversations with Kirkland Funny, ha ha The crowd: not laughing yet, but they will laugh. Oh, yes, they will laugh. Funnymen Bobby (right) gets animated. Justin Ide/Harvard Staff Photographer Five staff photographers will offer close-ups of the interests, activities, and personalities inside five Harvard Houses in installments over the course of the academic year. Within the dark-paneled Junior Common Room of Kirkland House, comedic duo Peter and Bobby Farrelly, the masterminds behind the teenage hilarity in the films “Dumb and Dumber” and “There’s Something About Mary,” entertained a crowd recently as part of the popular series “Conversations with Kirkland.”The series, started by Kirkland resident scholar Peter Emerson in 2002 and co-sponsored by the Office for the Arts, featured the New Englanders from Cumberland, R.I., who were introduced as the “renaissance men of comedy” by program coordinator Iris Lee ’12.The brothers, a year and a half apart in age, rapidly fell into a natural, humorous banter, a trait they have shared since childhood. They recounted a short history of their failures locally and a move to Hollywood, and they chalked up much of their success in Tinseltown to their sibling bond.Peter explained that having a brother with you to “fend off the studio” gives them a huge advantage. Having “a brother who is your partner,” he said, “who you also know has your best interests — he’s never going to hurt you — it’s a great thing.” Merrily, merrily, Farrelly The Farrelly brothers’ notorious comedic legacy incorporates films such as “There’s Something about Mary,” “Me, Myself & Irene,” and their first film, “Dumb and Dumber.” Introducing… Iris Lee ’12 coordinated the event and read a brief introduction. Just laid-back guys Peter Farrelly (front) and brother Bobby talk life and career with the Kirkland kids.last_img read more

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Sticking together

first_imgMost people expect to put on a few pounds over the holiday season — and spend January paying for it. But not Kathryn Kunkel.“I feel like I’ve gotten in better shape since November,” says the Th.D. program administrator. “And I’m more aware of what I’m eating.”In better shape? Since November?That’s right. Because Kunkel, along with about 200 of her colleagues from around the University, participated in Maintain Don’t Gain this year. Co-sponsored by the Harvard Recreation Department and the Center for Wellness, the program pits teams of four to six people against each other for prizes such as personal training sessions, private classes for the team, a massage, a team lunch — “and bragging rights,” says Kerry L. Smith, programs manager and a personal trainer at Hemenway Gymnasium. “It’s very big at Harvard to say that you won.”But winning, in this case, doesn’t mean losing weight, as it would in most gym-centered programs.“You can’t gain or lose more than 2 pounds either way,” says Jeanne Mahon, director of the Center for Wellness. “So if you’re 128 when you weighed in, you need to be 126 to 130 when you weigh out.”The team’s total weight is the one that counts, though, so if your four-person team’s total at weigh-in is 600 pounds, at weigh-out — which is coming up this week — it would have to hover between 592 and 608. Raffle prizes are also awarded, with teams getting extra raffle tickets for doing things such as attending classes together.“You can go to the classes for free,” Kunkel says, “and you don’t have to be a gym member.” Water aerobics, yoga, Zumba, and stress management are among the classes for Maintain Don’t Gain participants.“It’s a good way for people, particularly staff members, to sample classes they might not ordinarily do without fighting for space with a zillion undergraduates,” says Kunkel. “It’s a way to ease into it so it’s not so intimidating.”If you’re kicking yourself for not joining Maintain Don’t Gain when it started, don’t worry: You have a second chance. Maintain Don’t Gain may be over for the year, but a new program is just beginning. Team Fitness Challenge starts Jan. 31 and runs until March 11, and is similar to Maintain Don’t Gain in that it’s team-oriented, giving you motivation beyond just that little pinch of love handle.“Team Fitness Challenge is our most popular program,” says Christina Hoff, Fitness Program manager at Hemenway. Unlike for Maintain Don’t Gain, Team Fitness Challenge team members do have to belong to the gym — but the staff rate for membership is just $24 a year. Another difference is that rather than racking up raffle tickets, team members rack up points, with a daily maximum to discourage overtraining, by spending time in the gym; extra points are awarded for attendance at group exercise classes.If past years are any indication, many Maintain Don’t Gain alumni will go on to Team Fitness Challenge. “Now that they know how to maintain, they can lose weight with this next step,” says Smith. “Maintain Don’t Gain is a gateway to weight loss, helping people to make lifestyle changes for long-term health and fitness. You need to maintain your weight before you can lose.”Last year, Andrew Yahkind, J.D. ’10, organized a Team Fitness Challenge group of third-year law students.“I think generally I ended up in better shape,” he says. “You get stuck in a gym routine of doing the same thing day in and day out, and this forced us all to give something else a try. I’m a former frat boy from Michigan who’s spent a lot of time lifting and running, and I took a water aerobics class. It’s not something I stuck with, but I’m glad I was able to try it. We pushed each other to go into the gym more, and when the competition ended, we were sort of in that routine. It forces you to get into the groove of taking care of your health and fitness.”last_img read more

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The ‘diversity problem’ in science

first_imgOpportunities for women and people of color to pursue careers in science have improved in recent years, but still lag behind those of white men, Harvard College Dean Evelynn M. Hammonds told a crowd at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Jan. 27. Much work remains to be done, she said, to ensure that students from all backgrounds have an equal opportunity to enter and succeed in fields like engineering and technology.The remarks were part of the keynote address delivered by Hammonds at MIT’s Institute Diversity Summit. The annual conference provides an opportunity for students, faculty, and staff to learn about and discuss ways to promote excellence and diversity at the school.Hammonds, the Barbara Gutmann Rosenkrantz Professor of the History of Science and of African and African American studies, said that women and people of color had demonstrated time and again their interest in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM), as well as their ability to succeed in these fields. Scientists agree that race and gender should not determine whether a student pursues a career in STEM. So why, she asked rhetorically, do women, Latinos, African-Americans, and Native Americans continue to be underrepresented in these areas of study?To shed light on the question, Hammonds called on the work of the African-American intellectual, scholar, and activist W.E.B. Du Bois. Du Bois, she said, was the first to name and identify the ‘diversity problem’ in science in his 1939 essay “The Negro Scientist.” The piece was a response to the statements by a prominent white American scientist who had publicly noted how few African-Americans had made their mark in science.“The scientist had stated that Negroes — the preferred term of the period — had made their mark in music, literature and on the stage but not in the exact sciences,” she said. “Du Bois’ response called the man’s attention to the fact that it was not easy for an American Negro to pursue science.  Though the man publicly agreed with Du Bois’ point, privately he expressed to him ‘… that the exact and intensive habit of mind, the rigorous mathematical logic demanded of those who would be scientists [was] not natural to the Negro race.’”To disprove this opinion, Du Bois discussed the careers of the 12 African-American male scholars listed in American Men of Science. Although the men had been educated at some of the most prestigious schools in the country — including Harvard, Yale, Brown, Bowdoin, the University of Chicago, and Williams — their careers had been curtailed because of “color prejudice,” or racism.“In each instance, Du Bois described men who were well-educated, serious scholars and researchers,” Hammonds said. “They published in the leading journals in their fields and strived to attain positions in major institutions. Yet, in each case they were denied permanent positions for which they were qualified.  In many instances, their work was well regarded, and on that basis alone these men were sometimes offered prominent positions in the academy — only to be denied employment when ‘it was learned by correspondence or interview that they were colored.’”Du Bois also gave examples of discriminatory treatment toward graduate students, Hammonds said, including that of an African-American student who was denied a fellowship because his teacher believed that he would not be able to find work after studying science. Others were denied doctorates only on the basis of their color even after passing their general examinations. Young African-American scientists could sometimes find work in the historically black colleges and universities (HBCU), but these institutions typically had no laboratories, no museums, and no scientific collections.“Here in 1939, on the eve of World War II, Du Bois offered a powerful analysis of the ‘diversity problem’ in science,” Hammonds said. “He located that problem in the social context of the United States where legalized segregation constrained the opportunities of African-Americans who had the desire, the ability, and the education to do science.  More importantly, he asserted that the prejudice of white scientists was connected to the pervasive view that ‘the exact and intensive habit of mind, the rigorous mathematical logic demanded of those who would be scientists is not natural to the Negro race.’”African-American women faced even greater barriers to participation in science than their male counterparts, Hammonds said. Before World War II, there were only eight African-American women with Ph.D.s in science in the United States, compared with nearly 20,000 white men. All secured positions at historically black colleges, but, in addition to the lack of resources that plagued their male counterparts, the women encountered negative attitudes about gender roles that limited their advancement even within those institutions. Hammonds, who received a master’s degree in physics from MIT, commended the institution as one of the few in the country with a history of educating African-American women scientists. Even so, she said, the opportunities were few and far between.“The first African-American female graduated from MIT in 1902,” she said. “The second was in the 1950s; during the late 1960s MIT admitted only one or two African-American women a year. Significant numbers of women from this group were not admitted until the 1970s. The first African-American woman was appointed to the faculty in the 1970s; the first one tenured through the ranks in 1998; and the first African-American female faculty in the school of engineering was tenured just this year. As you can see, the barriers within science have persisted for minority women even as they changed for white women and minority men.”Hammonds made a plea for continued study of the issue of diversity in science and engineering. It is critical to better understand how scientific communities work and how talent is recognized, valued, and assessed, she said. To illustrate why, Hammonds closed her talk with a final quote from Du Bois.“One may say in answer to all this: so what?  After all, there are plenty of white men who can be trained as scientists.  Why crowd the field with Negroes who certainly can find other socially necessary work?  But the point is that ability and genius are strangely catholic in their tastes, regard no color line or racial inheritance.  They occur here, there, everywhere, without rule or reason.  The nation suffers that disregards them.  There is ability in the Negro race — a great deal of unusual and extraordinary ability, undiscovered, unused and unappreciated.  And in no line of work is ability so much needed today as in science.”last_img read more

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Affordable housing, saved

first_imgRepresentatives from the state, Harvard University, and the city of Cambridge joined with elected officials, affordable-housing advocates, and local residents on Feb. 8 to celebrate preserving the affordability of 25 homes in Chapman Arms Apartments in Harvard Square.The success resulted from a partnership between the city and Harvard, since the University holds the ground lease for the building, and the agreement was the first implementation of the state’s new preservation statute, Chapter 40 T.“The accomplishment of preserving affordable units in the heart of Harvard Square is such a tribute to the commitment of the Cambridge City Council,” said Bob Healy, city manager, who is also the managing trustee of the Cambridge Affordable Housing Trust and has worked to strengthen affordable housing during his 30 years with the city. “It’s also important to remember all that Harvard has done in partnership with the city of Cambridge in the area of affordable housing.”“This is what it means to preserve homes, and it’s not just preserving where people sleep at night, but how they live their lives,” said Marjorie Decker, the Cambridge city counselor who received word last spring that the apartments were in jeopardy. The officials had gathered for the celebration in a crowded room at the Harvard Kennedy School.Last April, residents of Chapman Arms, which is also known as Craigie Arms, grew concerned when their apartment building of 25 affordable units was put up for sale. With affordability restrictions on the units scheduled to expire in 2016, the units were an attractive investment for buyers interested in converting them to market-rate housing.Cambridge officials, residents, Harvard, affordable-housing advocates, developers, funders, and the state all participated in solving the problem.Working together, the city, Harvard, and the nonprofit Homeowner’s Rehab Inc. (HRI) were able to orchestrate HRI’s purchase of the building to ensure affordability of the 25 units for a minimum of 50 years. Harvard amended and extended its ground lease on the property in a manner that allowed HRI to secure the necessary financing from the Cambridge Affordable Housing Trust and the Community Economic Development Assistance Corporation (CEDAC). HRI purchased the building in a preservation transaction that was finalized on Dec. 19.Attending the ceremony were Cambridge City Manager Robert W. Healy (from left), Harvard Vice President for Campus Services Lisa Hogarty, Cambridge City Councilor Marjorie Decker, Undersecretary of the DHCD Aaron Gornstein, Executive Director of HRI Peter Daly, and Executive Director of CEDAC Roger Herzog.Chapman Arms was the first preservation acquisition to utilize Chapter 40T, the state’s new innovative expiring-use law that was pushed through by housing advocates and elected officials, including Rep. Kevin Honan of Allston-Brighton and longtime Rep. Alice Wolf of Cambridge, who spearheaded passing the legislation.Healy noted Harvard’s long history of supporting affordable housing in Cambridge, from the sale in the 1990s of 100 units to the city for the below-market rate of $32,000 each, to the creation of the 20/20/2000 program, a $20 million, 20-year, low-interest, revolving loan program that has helped to create 465 affordable units in Cambridge. He also acknowledged Harvard’s involvement in the effort, as holder of the ground lease on the property, which allowed the deal to come together.“It’s always nice to thank your host, but they deserve it,” said Healy. “They really have been a key player in the support of affordable housing in Cambridge for a very long time.”Lisa Hogarty, Harvard’s vice president for campus services, lauded the town-gown partnership, saying, “The city of Cambridge and Harvard have enjoyed a long and successful track record of working together to address the quality of life in the city. By any measure, Chapman Arms is an affordable-housing success story.”For Chapman Arms resident Linda Jordon, the success story is personal, since “This means 25 people will have a home.”last_img read more

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