Goldblatt: half a century in photos

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Goldblatt: half a century in photos

first_img18 August 2005A retrospective of David Goldblatt’s works, spanning his 51 years in photography, opened this week at the Johannesburg Art Gallery.The exhibition includes more than 250 photographs taken between 1948 to 2002 that document the changes South Africa has undergone.Fifty One Years, the name of the exhibition, is a Museu d’Art Contemporani de Barcelona production. It was originally curated by Corinne Diserens and Okwui Enwezor.So far, it has been seen in galleries and museums in New York, Barcelona, Rotterdam, Lisbon, Oxford, Brussels and Munich.Khwezi Gule, curator for contemporary collections at the Johannesburg Art Gallery, describes the exhibition as “a tribute to Goldblatt’s contribution to the world of photography, not only in South Africa but in the world.”Miners going home: Mayfair railway station, Johannesburg, December 1952Born in Randfontein in 1930, Goldblatt became interested in photography while in high school. He wanted to become a magazine photographer after he matriculated, in 1948. However, after trying in vain to join the industry, he went to work in the family business selling men’s wear.After his father died in 1962 he sold the family business and devoted his time to photography.“My professional work has been almost entirely outside the studio and has involved a broad variety of assignments for magazines, corporations and institutions in South Africa and overseas,” Goldblatt wrote in a piece for the Goodman Gallery website.Source: City of Johannesburglast_img read more

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Database to help unemployed teachers

first_imgA database is created so that professionally qualified South African teachers can register themselves when seeking employment in public schools.The database aims to cut down on turnaround times in filling vacant teaching posts across the country. (Image: Brand South Africa)Brand South Africa reporterThe Department of Basic Education has created a national recruitment database to ensure that qualified teachers are employed and deployed on time to schools.The database, which will keep details of professionally qualified teachers seeking employment in public schools, will also cut down on turnaround times in filling vacant teaching posts across the country.All professionally qualified South African teachers are invited to register to be added to the database. Application forms can be downloaded from the department’s website – www.education.gov.za – completed and posted or hand-delivered to the department along with copies of qualifications and academic records.Principals and school governing bodies on the lookout for new teachers can easily access the database to find people who meet the criteria of the posts they are trying to fill.All the information – including a concise version of each teacher’s curriculum vitae, verified qualifications, subjects covered and teaching experience – is electronically captured on a single spreadsheet and sorted by province, enabling quick search and filter options.Updated versions of the database will be uploaded each monthly basis to ensure that candidates who have found employment are removed and new candidates added.“The database is one of the measures employed by the department in response to delays experienced in deploying temporary teachers to vacant posts,” the department said in a statement on Wednesday.Source: South African Government News Agency.Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

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Everything You Need to Know About Exporting Video

first_imgBreak through the confusion and save yourself some time with these quick tips for great exporting video files.When it comes to exporting video, there’s a lot to learn. From bit-depths to codecs, it can all be quite intimidating for someone new to the exporting game. Instead of wasting time exporting (only to find your video pixelated or too large in size), check out this quick tutorial created by David Kong.Kong’s video covers everything you need to know about exporting in Adobe Media Encoder, which can be used to export timelines and compositions from After Effects and Premiere Pro. However, the topics covered by David apply to any other editing software, including FCPX and Avid Media Composer.The tutorial takes a very scientific look at how what various exporting terms mean, including:FormatsCodecs and WrappersAssigning PresetsUnderstanding Bit-RatesSquare vs. Anamorphic PixelsThe Benefits of Multi-Pass RenderingIf you’re  interested in learning more about codecs, check out the first part of this series in our ‘Everything You Need to Know About Codecs‘ post.This video was first shared by David Kong on his Vimeo channel. Thanks for sharing, David!Want to learn more about exporting? Check out a few of the following resources:Exporting with Alpha Channels in After EffectsExporting Finished Video from Premiere ProExporting Video with an Alpha Channel in FCPXHave any additional exporting tips?  Let us know in the comments below.last_img read more

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NHAI rapped for not maintaining green cover along highways

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Actorcomedian Andrew Phung accuses Toronto police officer of racist comment

first_imgTORONTO – A comedian and actor said a racist incident he saw on the streets of Toronto on Saturday was not representative of the Canada he wants to live in.Andrew Phung had dropped his family off at Rogers Centre for a Blue Jays game, parked his car nearby and was walking to the stadium when he says he saw a police officer tell a driver to “go back to your country.”Phung, who stars in the CBC sitcom “Kim’s Convenience,” described the alleged incident in a series of tweets Saturday afternoon and a phone interview Saturday evening. Toronto police said they’re investigating.He said he was waiting to cross the downtown street with a group of about 20 other people when the light changed, and a driver he described as a person of colour hesitated to pull through the intersection.Phung said an on-duty police officer shouted at the driver to proceed, which the person did, but as the officer was walking back toward the sidewalk, Phung said he heard the cop say, “If you can’t drive, go back to your country.”Phung said he responded by shouting, “That’s not cool.”“Two men beside me then said, ‘Nope, totally cool. If you can’t drive, go back to your f—ing country.’ The comedian in me then burst out and then I proceeded to ask them why they thought driving ability equated citizenship in this country.”Phung said he thinks the driver hesitated because the intersection had two sets of lights that were close together, and the other set of lights was red.“I think as a whole we can all agree that we’ve all been confused before in Toronto traffic,” Phung said.“It was just so disappointing to see this coming from a police officer,” said Phung. “They’re the moral backbone of our community, they uphold the law. So when you see a police officer doing that, it empowered two other people to join in on that racism.”“We have spent the evening gathering information so we can investigate what happened,” said Mark Pugash, spokesman for Toronto police, on Saturday.last_img read more

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Condé Nast Moving Away From Magazine Web Sites as Print Companions

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iOS AR app Wonderscope teaches kids about bullies in space

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Infosys Sacks BPO Finance Chief Over Violation of Code of Conduct CEO

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3 bikers killed in Ctg road crash

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WATCH HISD Superintendent Richard Carranza Leaving For NYC Post

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