New faculty deans appointed

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New faculty deans appointed

first_imgDanoff Dean of Harvard College Rakesh Khurana announced today the appointment of new faculty deans for Dunster and Mather Houses. Sean Kelly and Cheryl Chen will shepherd Dunster, while and L. “Maha” and Amala Mahadevan will do the same at Mather. They will take up their posts this fall.“Harvard’s House system is one of the unique features of our undergraduate experience,” Khurana said. “Ensuring its excellence and vitality in the 21st century is critical to our educational mission. I am delighted that these four thoughtful and talented members of our Harvard community will be serving as faculty deans. They are devoted teachers, scholars, and community members, and are committed to ensuring that each Harvard House feels like a home where students can bring together their academic, social, and personal passions and pursuits.”Sean Kelly and Cheryl ChenSean Kelly is the Teresa G. and Ferdinand F. Martignetti Professor of Philosophy at Harvard University. Kelly earned an Sc.B. in mathematics and computer science and an M.S. in cognitive and linguistic sciences from Brown University in 1989. He received his Ph.D. in philosophy from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1998. Before coming to Harvard in 2006, he taught in philosophy and the humanities at Stanford University and in philosophy and neuroscience at Princeton University. His work focuses on various aspects of the philosophical, phenomenological, and cognitive neuroscientific nature of human experience. Kelly has a special interest in the student-athlete experience, having been a varsity swimmer at Brown.Cheryl Chen is a senior lecturer on philosophy at Harvard University. Chen received her B.A. from Amherst College in 1994 and her Ph.D. in philosophy from the University of California, Berkeley, in 2002. She was an assistant professor at Bryn Mawr College before coming to Harvard in 2006. Her areas of interest include the philosophy of mind, epistemology, metaphysics, and the philosophy of religion. Since 2014, she has served as associate head tutor for the Philosophy Department, where she is responsible for advising the department’s 80 concentrators. Chen enjoys running in her spare time, most recently with the philosophy department’s team, The Runaway Trolleys.They have two children, Ben, 12, and Nathaniel, 7. Ben is an avid soccer and cello player. Nathaniel also plays the cello, and loves reading, drawing, and Legos.“Our whole family is thrilled to become a part of the Dunster House community,” said Sean Kelly and Cheryl Chen in a statement. “The students, tutors, and staff we have met so far have been incredibly warm and welcoming, and we can’t wait to meet all the Dunsterites in the fall.”“We feel honored to be the next faculty deans of Mather [House],” said L. Mahadevan, who will share the role with his wife, Amala Mahadevan. Photo courtesy of L. MahadevanL. “Maha” Mahadevan and Amala MahadevanMahadevan is the Lola England de Valpine Professor of Applied Mathematics, of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, and of Physics at Harvard University, where he has been since 2003. He also is the area dean for applied mathematics in the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.  He received his Ph.D. at Stanford University in 1995 and began his career as an assistant professor at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), after which he was the Schlumberger Professor in the Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics at Cambridge University, and a fellow of Trinity College. Mahadevan’s work seeks to understand the shape and flow of physical and biological matter in space and time, from the mechanics of graphene to the dynamics of tectonic plates, from the morphogenesis of  a cell to the cognition of geometry. He is a fellow of the Royal Society of London. At Harvard, Mahadevan has taught more than 15 different courses in mathematics, physics, biology, and engineering at the undergraduate and graduate level, and advised more than 50 Ph.D. students and postdoctoral fellows.Outside academics, Mahadevan enjoys swimming, biking, and learning about the history of human conflict and the history of science.Amala Mahadevan is an oceanographer, a senior scientist at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, and a faculty member in the Joint Program in Oceanography between MIT and Woods Hole. She received her Ph.D. in environmental fluid mechanics from Stanford University in 1995 and consequently worked at the University of Chicago, Cambridge University, and Boston University, before moving to Woods Hole in 2011. Her research addresses the dynamics of the ocean and the implications for climate. She participates in research cruises to gather data, uses computational modeling to unravel the interaction of physical and biological processes in the oceans, and enjoys working with her students and postdocs. She is a recipient of a 2014-15 fellowship at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study.  She is particularly interested in increasing awareness about the role of the ocean in the Earth’s changing climate and is writing a book on the subject. Outside science, Amala trained professionally as an Indian classical dancer for more than 20 years. This has led to an abiding interest in promoting music and the arts, with a recent stint as chair of a South Asian performing arts organization at MIT.The Mahadevans have two children, both of whom attend Harvard College, and a dog who answers to a cat’s name, Cheetah.  They enjoy good food, stimulating conversations, classical music, and the outdoors, and are committed to sustainable living and conserving the environment.“We feel honored to be the next faculty deans of Mather,” the Mahadevans said in a statement. “We look forward to working with and learning from the remarkable students, tutors and staff, and collectively nurture the rich intellectual, social, and cultural communities that have thrived under the leadership of Faculty Deans Christie McDonald and Michael Rosengarten.”Dean of Freshmen Tom Dingman, who assisted in the search, said, “Everyone on the in-House advisory committees who met Sean and Cheryl and Maha and Amala were impressed by their warmth, depth of experience, high energy, and commitment to supporting students.”“We are thrilled with the selection of Sean Kelly and Cheryl Chen as the next faculty deans at Dunster House and are confident that the vibrant Dunster community will welcome them with open arms,” said current Dunster Faculty Deans Roger and Ann Porter in a statement. “They will find, as we did, that Dunster has a solid tradition of excellence in all it does and that its diverse students and tutors benefit enormously from a culture that values the many interests, talents, perspectives, and backgrounds that make it a truly exciting place to call home.”“Mather has been our home for seven years, and we have enjoyed the wonderful richness of the community,” said McDonald and Rosengarten in a statement. “We stand on the shoulders of past faculty deans going, back to the creation of Mather in the 1970s, and we are delighted to pass on the baton to Maha and Amala, who are superbly qualified to lead Mather into the future.”last_img read more

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Covid-19: WTA Suffers New Blow With Japan’s Premier Women’s Event Scrapped

first_imgChances of any professional tennis tournaments taking place in Asia this year is looking increasingly unlikely with the Toray Pan Pacific Open in Tokyo becoming the latest event to be axed. Japanese officials confirmed in a statement on Tuesday that the event has been cancelled over safety concerns with fears of a second spike in COVID-19 cases in the country later this year. Making it the third tennis event in Japan to be cancelled after the WTA Hana-Cupid Open and ATP Rakuten Open. The Premier event has been set to get underway during the week commencing November 2nd after being delayed from its original date of September. It is the first time the Pan Pacific Open has been cancelled since its birth back in 1984. Outside of China, Tokyo is the only Asian city to host a Premier event on the women’s Tour. Last year it offered a prize money pool of $823,000. “The Executive Committee looked at every possible way to make this tournament happen, including the idea of holding matches without audiences or restricting admissions in order to prioritize the health and safety of everyone involved,” tournament organizers said in a statement.“However, after a series of deliberations, the Executive Committee made a heartrending decision to rule out the postponement, and concluded that the cancellation of the tournament was the best decision in the interest of public health, especially in light of the concern about the second wave of infection spreading in Japan.”Advertisement The announcement comes less than a week after the WTA and ATP officially cancelled all their tournaments set to be played in China due to a ruling by the government. A huge blow for women’s tennis which had planned to stage seven events in the country, including the year-end WTA Finals. Last year the China swing offered roughly $30 million in prize money. read also:July 8: On This Day In The History of Women’s Tennis Former world No.1 Naomi Osaka is the reigning champion in Tokyo after powering her way to the title without dropping a set in 2019. The triumph made Osaka the first Japanese player to win the event since Kimiko Date back in 1995. Other previous winners include Karolina Pliskova, Caroline Wozniacki and Maria Sharapova. Following the removal of Tokyo from the Calendar, only three WTA tournaments have so far been given a provisional the green light to take place after the French Open. They are in Seoul, Linz and Moscow. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Loading… center_img Promoted ContentBest & Worst Celebrity Endorsed Games Ever MadeA Hurricane Can Be As Powerful As 10 Atomic Bombs7 Ways To Understand Your Girlfriend Better10 Risky Jobs Some Women Do27 Animals That Don’t Need Color To Be CoolTop 10 Most Romantic Nations In The WorldWhich Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme Parks10 Of The Dirtiest Seas In The World7 Mind-Boggling Facts About Black Holes10 Most Evil Female Characters In Disney Movies6 Best 90’s Action Movies From Your Childhoodlast_img read more

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Girls soccer Bears, Lakers earn wins before playoffs

first_img Tags: CazenoviaChittenangogirls soccer And the Bears traveled north to face General Brown Saturday afternoon, where it prevailed 2-1 over the Lions, goals by Garcia and Martin proving enough as Kelly recorded seven saves.Cazenovia, meanwhile, only had one game last week, but made it count as it traveled to Hannibal and, with a big first half, produced a 4-1 victory over the Warriors.All of the goals came early as Caitlin Smithers and Katie Rajkowski led the way, each finishing with one goal and one assist. Julia Reff also had a goal as as Ava Gavitt and Molly Dolan got assists, too.With a final regular-season mark of 11-4-1, Cazenovia picked up the no. 8 seed for the Section III Class B playoffs and host no. 9 seed South Jefferson in Wednesday’s opening round. A possible quarterfinal with top seed Central Valley Academy could await the Lakers with a victory over the Spartans.And with its 13-3 record, Chittenango landed the no. 6 seed. Also at home for its opening-round game, the Bears face no. 11 seed Phoenix on Thursday night, the winner to get to the quarterfinals against no. 3 seed Westhill or no. 14 seed General Brown.Share this:FacebookTwitterLinkedInRedditComment on this Story Maryanna Garcia finished with one goal and one assist as Sarah Martin and Ally Shoemaker also found the net. Bears goalkeeper Cassidy Kelly stopped all nine shots she faced.A night later, amid the wind and rain, Chittenango faced Mexico, and the challenging conditions affected both teams, but the Bears did enough to edge the Tigers 3-2.Martin had a part in each of Chittenango’s three scoring plays, netting two goals and assisting on Ally Shoemaker’s tally. Shoemaker also assisted on a Martin goal and Kelly had to make seven saves.center_img During the last week of the regular season, the Chittenango girls soccer team was intent to build upon the good work it had done to turn around a mid-season slump, including its 3-1 win over Cazenovia on Oct. 7.The Bears hosted Solvay last Tuesday night and got an effort from its offense similar to what it was doing early this fall during a 7-0 shutout of the Bearcats.For Chittenango, the most encouraging part was the distribution of its production. Emily Moon led the way, scoring twice and getting a pair of assists, while Madison Wagner also got two goals.last_img read more

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