Land stewards

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Land stewards

first_imgBy Faith PeppersUniversity of Georgia For almost 150 years, a Harris has farmed the Screven, Ga., land that’s home to Greenview Farms. This week, Gov. Sonny Perdue recognized Jonny Harris and his family for their faithful care with the second annual Governor’s Agricultural Environmental Stewardship Award.”I can’t tell you how exciting it is to see all the support for our state’s largest industry,” Perdue said in a National Agriculture Week ceremony March 20.Perdue honored five Georgia farms that use outstanding environmental practices.”It’s my pleasure to honor these farmers for their good stewardship,” he said. “Our farmers work hard to protect the environment and preserve our resources, and we’re happy to recognize these farm families for their efforts today.”Besides Harris, regional winners were David Brown of Longview Cattle Farm in Senoia, Chan Cabe of Cabe Brothers Farm in Carnesville, Glenn Waller of Waller Farm in Harrison and Don Register of Don Register Farm in Chula.Harris said the state honor “goes back to my ancestry. We’ve worked on this land for 140 years. My ancestors tried to do the right things, and we try to do the right things.”He and the other honorees showed they’re willing to make personal sacrifices to go beyond what’s required to meet environmental standards.”It has challenges,” Harris admitted. “We look at so many things we’re doing now that are the opposite of what was done before. We see the value of changing those practices and the good that comes from it. They’re expensive to do, some of them.”Harris said the U.S. Natural Resources Conservation Service and other state and federal agencies help them do some things. “But the majority of them we do essentially by ourselves,” he said. “They’re things we need to do, and with their help, we know what to do to improve the quality of our land.”Greenview Farms is divided almost equally among timber, pastures and cultivated land. They grow hay, peanuts, cotton, corn and other crops and raise beef cattle.”In 1942 my parents, Winton and Emily Harris, established what is now known as Greenview Polled Hereford Farms, Inc.,” Harris said. “My father began a Polled Hereford cattle herd, and we continue to raise Polled Herefords today. That makes Greenview Farms the oldest, continuously active Polled Hereford breeder in Georgia. Hard work and determination have helped to make this family operation a success.””Mr. Harris serves as a model farmer,” said Rita Barrow, NRCS district conservationist. “His love and concern for his land, as well as his pride in ownership, are evident as soon as you enter his property.”His land and cattle reflect his concern for conservation,” she said. “He’s actively working to limit access of his cattle to wetlands with exclusion fencing, and he’s installed a manure storage facility to help maintain water quality in Reedy Creek.”He has installed heavy-use concrete pads under hay rings and water troughs to maintain water quality and prevent soil erosion,” she said. “He regularly rotates his cattle throughout numerous paddocks to maintain soil and water quality and to provide quality forage for his cattle.”Greenville Farms uses conservation tillage on cropland to prevent erosion and maintain water quality.”He has a Forest Stewardship Plan, and he regularly thins and prescribe-burns his forest lands to maintain forest health and increase wildlife habitat,” Barrow said. “Mr. Harris treats all of his resources well and implements best-management practices in all of his farm activities.”The award is sponsored by the Governor’s Agriculture Advisory Commission. It was developed to recognize farmers in five state regions who use conservation and best-management practices day-to-day to protect and conserve natural resources. Last year’s winner, the inaugural year, was Petty’s Dairy in Chatsworth.last_img read more

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March 15, 2005 On the Move

first_imgOn the Move Michael Holt and Brian Baggot were recently named as partners with Rumberger, Kirk & Caldwell. Holt works in the Miami office and has been an associate with the firm since 2000. He practices in the areas of commercial and consumer litigation, general liability defense, and pest control litigation. Baggot works in the Tampa office and practices in the areas of civil trial defense, including commercial litigation, insurance defense, and pest control litigation. Before joining the firm, he served for six years as a United States Army judge advocate. (Editor’s Note: In the March 1 News , we mistakenly reported that Francis H. Sheppard had been named a partner with Rumberger, Kirk & Caldwell, when in actuality he has been with the firm for 20 years, having joined the firm after graduating law school in 1984. He has served as managing partner with the firm since May 2004.) Andrew J. Fruit, Jennifer G. Roeper and Sally T. Woodward joined Fowler White Boggs Banker in Tampa as associates. Fruit practices in the firm’s corporate, securities, and finance practice group. Roeper concentrates on immigration and naturalization. Woodward concentrates in the area of general business, corporations, limited liability companies, and transactional work. R. Gene Aldridge also joined the firm in Jacksonville and concentrates in the area of real estate. Evan B. Plotka announces the formation of his firm with offices at 7771 W. Oakland Park Blvd., Atrium West, Suite 122, Sunrise 33351; phone (954) 334-7600; fax (954) 334-7755. The firm concentrates in the areas of construction litigation, commercial litigation, and probate and guardianships. William Banks and Astrid Guardado joined Becker & Poliakoff in Tampa Bay. Banks focuses on business immigration. Guardado focuses on multi-party civil litigation with an emphasis on construction, real estate, commercial and employment law litigation, and insurance defense. Additionally, Jennifer Perelman, Laurel Wiley, and Georg Ketelhohn joined the firm in Ft. Lauderdale and West Palm Beach. Perelman joined the commercial litigation practice group; Wiley joined the commercial litigation and community association groups; Ketelhohn joined the construction law group. Gregory P. Borgognoni, Nicolas J. Gutierrez, Jr., and Hugo Arza announce the formation of Borgognoni, Gutierrez & Arza in Miami. The firm concentrates in the areas of complex commercial litigation, health care, intellectual property, government relations, real estate, and business. The office is located at 2665 S. Biscayne Dr., Suite 701, Miami 33133. Alan H. Baseman was named partner in the Palm Beach Gardens firm Comiter & Singer. Nancy S. Paikoff was named shareholder in Macfarlane, Ferguson & McMullen in Clearwater. Paikoff practices in the areas of health care, medical malpractice defense, and business and corporate. Luis Martinez-Monfort was elected shareholder of Mills Paskert Divers in Tampa. Martinez-Monfort is chair of the firm’s bankruptcy and creditors’ rights practice group. David S. Johnson and Matthew J. Moore were made partners of Shook, Hardy & Bacon in Tampa. Johnson concentrates in defending errors and omissions claims against insurance and real estate agents and profession liability claims against attorneys. Moore is member of the pharmaceutical and medical device litigation group. Jonathan M. Streisfeld was named a partner in Brinkley, McNerney, Morgan, Solomon & Tatum in Ft. Lauderdale. Streisfeld concentrates in the area of business litigation. Thomas F. Asbury and Douglas E. Myers III joined Tritt & Franson in Jacksonville. Asbury concentrates on real estate law and Myers concentrates on commercial litigation. Julia M Cook joined the Law Offices of John C. Bovay in Gainesville. Stewart Fried joined Kilpatrick Stockton in Washington D.C. Fried concentrates in the areas litigation and dispute resolution matters. Jon L. Mills joined Upchurch, Watson, White & Max in Daytona Beach as a mediator. Richard Kuper joined the Miami-Dade League of Cities as executive director. The Merlin Law Group was recently formed and will concentrate on representing insurance claimants with insurance disputes and claims. Formerly Gunn-Merlin, The Merlin Law group will continue to maintain its offices on Harbour Island in Tampa. Andrea J. Christle joined Jupiter Law Center in Jupiter. Christle handles matters including wills and estates, real estate, divorce, bankruptcy, personal injury, criminal law, and litigation. Kenneth J. McKenna and William E. Ruffier were made partners in Dellecker, Wilson & King in Orlando. David Bond was made a partner in White & Case in Miami. Bond heads the firm’s international trade practice group. John J. Fumero of Lewis, Longman & Walker was made a shareholder in the firm. Fumero practices in the areas of environmental, land use, and governmental law. Won-Young Jung joined Akerman Senterfitt in Ft. Lauderdale as a legal consultant in the corporate practice group. Additionally, Vitauts Gulbis joined the firm in Tampa as of counsel in the tax group. David E. Menet was named a partner in Salter, Feiber, Murphy, Hutson & Menet in Gainesville. Menet focuses on real estate and business law. Monique Edwards was appointed to serve as executive counsel to the secretary of the Department of Natural Resources by Louisiana Gov. Kathleen Blanco. Alan S. Grunspan, Niall T. McLachlan, David J. Smith, and Jason R. Alderman joined Carlton Fields in Miami. Richard Celler announces the opening of The Celler Legal Group. The firm concentrates in helping employees recover unpaid overtime, final paychecks, and other wages. The firm can be reached at (954) 243-4295 or www.floridaovertimelawyer.com. Jackson & Hardwick and Morris & Schneider announced a merger and will be called Morris Hardwick Schneider. Michael Keller joined Lott & Friedland in Ft. Lauderdale and will head the firm’s chemical, pharmaceutical, biomedical, and medical devices patent practice group. Natalie J. Carlos was named a partner of Adorno & Yoss. Carlos concentrates in the areas of commercial litigation and appellate practice. Elizabeth A. Martialay joined Shutts & Bowen in Miami as a partner in the firm’s financial services industry practice group. Mark Casteel, Jack B. Tuter, Jr., and Bill Wichmann were made partners in Conrad & Scherer. The firm has opened a new office in Tallahassee and concentrates in malpractice defense and corporate law. Additionally, David E. Irwin, Sara Walters, Albert “Chip” Hutzler, and Jacqueline A. Taylor joined the firm as associates. Carlos Fernandez joined Abadin, Jaramillo, Cook & Heffernan in Miami. Fernandez focuses in complex commercial litigation, professional liability litigation, medical negligence, and insurance defense. Jeanne A. Liebegott has joined Katz Barron in Miami as an associate. Liebegott practices in the areas of land use and zoning, real estate, and business and corporate matters. Craig V. Rasile of Hunton & Williams in Miami was chosen to lead the bankruptcy and creditors’ rights practice group. Carrie Freeman Weintraub joined the Professional Recruiting Division of Sterling Management Resources, Inc. Weintraub recruits attorneys at all levels for law firms and corporations in Florida. Mary Lou Powell joined Investors Title Insurance Company in South Carolina as vice president of underwriting operations and marketing. Brian H. Pollock opened the Law Office of Brian H. Pollock at 3550 Biscayne Blvd., Suite 400, Miami 33139. The firm practices civil litigation, and provides personalized legal representation, advice and counseling to individuals and growing businesses. Pollock can be reached by phone (305) 807-5377, and by fax (605) 675-8260. Brett J. Schneider joined Akerman Senterfitt in Ft. Lauderdale as a labor and employment associate in the litigation department. March 15, 2005 On the Move March 15, 2005 On the Movelast_img read more

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Auction preview: Gold Coast top three homes going under the hammer

first_img9 Pensacola Court, Broadbeach Waters.Agent Marcel Hollett of Harcourts Coastal Broadbeach said he had interest in the home from as far as Sydney.“If buyers are looking for a good quality value in a quality area, then I would say come a look at this property,” he said.“This particular property offers really good buying.” 6 Torrevella Vista, Coombabah.The commercial quality build of 6 Torrevella Vista includes full perimeter external concrete tilt panel walls, a suspended concrete slab and concrete staircase.At 2pm a luxury waterfront property at Broadbeach Waters will go under the hammer.The five-bedroom modern home is just off the main river and offers skyline views to Surfers Paradise and Broadbeach. 76 Sunshine Pde, Miami.More from news02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa17 hours ago02:37Gold Coast property: Sovereign Islands mega mansion hits market with $16m price tag2 days agoHe said Miami was continuing to gain strong interest from buyers.“Burleigh Heads, Burleigh Waters and Mermaid Beach are getting quite expensive and a lot of people are seeing value for money in Miami which is driving that interest,” he said.Buyers wanting to move into a larger home are keen on a five-bedroom residence at Coombabah which is going to auction on Saturday at 11am. 76 Sunshine Pde, Miami.“There has been a lot of interest and it’s only been on the market just over three weeks,” agent Guy Powell of Ray White Mermaid Beach said.“It’s been attracting some local buyers who want to step up from units and apartments.“There has also been interest from Sydney and Melbourne.” 6 Torrevella Vista, Coombabah.“It’s a bit like a resort, with an L-shaped pool and plenty of funky features,” Ray White Sovereign Islands agent Sebastian Ross said.“It’s also walking distance to shops and restaurants, and a five-minute drive to the Broadwater and Harbour Town.” Harcourts Coastal managing director and auctioneer Dane Atherton in action earlier this year. Picture: Jerad WilliamsTHE weather may have cooled but there are a several hot properties going under the hammer this weekend.On Saturday, a three-bedder at Miami is set to go to auction at 10am.The property at 76 Sunshine Pde is in original condition and is bring marketed to buyers as an opportunity to “renovate, rebuild or redevelop”. 9 Pensacola Court, Broadbeach Waters.last_img read more

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The principal who built a community

first_img“Education opens doors for everyone. My background is proof of that.” Dr. Fannie Sebolela (Image: Sulaiman Philip)• Dr. Fannie SebolelaPrincipalKhensani Primary School+27 12 7974217• Helping kids shine at school – in their own language • The importance of learning to read • Sanitary pad project gives poor and rural girls dignity • Blecher changes the education paradigm • South Africa’s mother tongue education challengeSulaiman PhilipThe intense fragrance of the blossoming hook trees is the first sensory experience you have at Khensani Primary School in Soshanguve. Towering over the roofs of the classrooms, which are clustered around a garden, the soft green leaves and creamy white flowers throw a mosaic of shadows across the courtyard.A pupil, no older than seven, darts through the garden, hops on to a walkway and heads towards a classroom. From inside, a cheery song of multiplication tables can be heard, the children’s sing-song voices flowing across the grounds. As he is about to reach the safety of his classroom, the pupil is brought up short by a familiar voice.“Tuck your shirt in and wipe the dust off your shoes,” Dr Fannie Sebolela, the school’s principal, demands in Tswana. Even in the airless heat Sebolela’s tie lies snug against his throat. Minutes later the newly neat pupil skips off into his classroom.Being kind and supportive, yet exacting, has helped Sebolela turn around Khensani Primary from a failing school with dropping enrolment into a model facility with applications far outstripping the places available. Today, it is the top performing school in the Tshwane District and one of the best government schools in the country. His determination to change the lives of the children at Khensani has landed him the Teacher of the Year Award twice. This year, again, he is the Gauteng representative for the national award.“We see our success even affecting Soshanguve High School. Our children are channelled into the mathematics programme and I get calls from the principal praising their work ethic. Last year, four Khensani kids were among the top matriculants in the province.”Watch Dr. Sebolela being interviewed on CNN’s Voices of Africa (Credit: CNN)Rebuilding a rundown schoolWhen Sebolela arrived at Khensani in 1999, it was two rundown blocks of 10 classrooms with ceilings caving in, plumbing that continually backed up and fields of dry dust. A lean man who speaks in measured tones, the first thing he set about doing was rebuilding the school’s relationship with the community.“Some people called it a bribe but for me it was a way to motivate parents to become involved in upgrading the school. We planted a garden to provide fresh vegetables to the community. We went from 10 parents at the first meeting to where parents were volunteering to help clean the school.”Discipline with dignity describes Sebolela’s teaching philosophy. In a community where most of the households barely survive he sees his school as an oasis. He began with a measured enforcement of rules, especially where it came to school uniforms. He demanded that each child, no matter their circumstances, be dressed in a full uniform. For the poorest of his students, he went out and found sponsors to donate clothing.“We remind them that their minds are not disadvantaged or deprived, and the more time they spend focused today the easier the future becomes. I tell the children that your circumstances must not define who you become, take pride in what you are capable of. Education is the key that will open doors.”Sebolela strides around his school grounds pointing out the improvements that have been made. The Department of Basic Education has more challenges than it has resources, he says, but that should not stop an enterprising principal from going out to look for solutions on his own. With help from corporate sponsors – BMW, Dole and Safmarine have been the biggest benefactors – Sebolela has managed to build a new library, a computer centre that is open to the community, new classrooms, and the vegetable gardens for the benefit of the neighbourhood.“We use the memory of our past to improve our present” Dr. Fannie Sebolela (Image: Sulaiman Philip) Value of partnershipsHe sees himself as the chief executive of the school, someone who does not have the luxury of folding his arms and waiting for problems to be solved by somebody in an office far away. “I want to change the lives of my children so I can’t fold my arms and cry. We never ask for donations; we want partnerships. People are eager to help if you can show that you are making a difference. Our partners share our goal of providing the best education.”Everyone grows up watching teachers teach, and assumes that it’s a simple, easily learnt task, but teaching is an extremely difficult skill to master, Sebolela says. Teachers coming out of university are not ready to stand in front of a classroom, he argues, but as is his nature he is helping those who want to be helped. He mentors young educators and tutors experienced teachers on Saturdays.Sebolela jokes that he has not had a weekend off since he was 16 so it’s not much of a sacrifice. Back then, he gave up his weekends to work as a gardener in his hometown of Mabopane to supplement his mother’s income. “I worked for a Mr De Klerk who constantly urged me to dream bigger. He would say ‘Aangaan, aangaan, leer‘ (go on, go on, study). He even offered to pay for me to study further.”He received his Primary Teachers Certificate in 1979 then, as he jokes, he went on – and he was the best BA and honours student at the University of Pretoria. Sebolela has published a Tswana-English dictionary and is the author of the maths workbook for Grade 3. The only way to get children to achieve great things, he points out, is to have teachers who inspire through achievement. Most of his teachers live in the community, and are encouraged to come in early and to stay late.“Education is meaningless if you don’t give back to your community,” he says, candidly. Sitting on the child-sized bus bench on the tarred section of the school grounds used to teach road safety, he raises his head to the sun. His eyes closed, he is silent, listening to the noises of learning coming from the classrooms. “When I started teaching principals wanted me posted to their schools because I was such a hard worker. I coached gymnastics, I was a choirmaster, I pushed myself because all I ever wanted to be was a teacher. That dedication is what I demand from my staff as well.”last_img read more

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Feeding Farmers Week 3 – Watson Farms, Sandusky County

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Week number three of Feeding Farmers, courtesy of AgriGold, took the Ohio Ag Net crew to Watson Farms in northern Ohio on the Sandusky-Seneca County line.The family operation is headed up by Dusten Watson. He took over in recent years after his dad Lee handed down the keys to the next generation, something he plans to do himself down the road. The farm also recently brought on the full-time employee Joe Ringholz.They’ve experienced a unique planting season. Some much needed rain this past Thursday was “a godsend.” Dusten did say that they should’ve stayed home with regard to planting on May 9th as everything put in the field that day had to be replanted.Ty Higgins talks more about the farm in the video below.last_img read more

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Geocachers Care – “One Ring to Rule Them All”

first_img SharePrint RelatedAnnouncing the Geocacher of the Month: November 2014December 31, 2014In “Community”Interviews With Geocaching Filmmakers – Part 2February 18, 2015In “GIFF”Geocacher of the Month Nominees – Add Your CommentsAugust 12, 2011In “Community” AgTitan receives his alumni ring, againErik Hulse, AgTitan, gets straight to the point, “This is a story I will be telling for the rest of my life, a story I will never forget.”The story he’s talking about – and will talk about for decades to come – begins on the soft, muddy bank of a Texas river.  AgTitan and Kenny Wade, GeoGeex, hiked through a park on an early April geocaching adventure.Their first obstacle would be little more than a slithering side note. AgTitan says, “The hike was several miles and the snakes were out in force.  GeoGeex spotted the first snake of the twelve we saw that day.  We both had several close calls, almost stepping on several snakes during the day, but thankfully we averted disaster with the snakes.”But an attempt to cross a river set the stage for a good deed that AgTitan could little imagine. He fell hard into the water. He says, “According to GeoGeex, the high pitched wail and spastic water dance was a sight to behold.  We learned several things during the encounter… like… when your hand hits the muddy, clay-like material on bottom of a creek, Aggie rings easily slip off the finger!” AgTitan lost his beloved “Aggie ring.” It’s a Texas A&M University alumni ring.  He says, “It sobered the mood the rest of the day.”But AgTitan put a call out for help. He posted the coordinates of his fall into the river on a local geocaching Facebook page, jokingly calling the location, “One Ring to Rule Them All.”Ground zero (GZ) where the ring was lostJeff Cruser, Z_Malloc, saw the post and reacted, “I knew that I could not let a fellow Aggie (Texas A&M Alumni) lose his ring without at least hunting for it! So I packed up my metal detector from work and loaded up the cachepack for a water trip.”But Z_Malloc wasn’t prepared for the jumble of fallen trees when he reached the location where the ring was lost. He says “As I approached GZ (the coordinates) I saw that it was not just a simple narrow stream with a single log to search around, but it was to be a whole blockade of logs and other submerged debris with small rapids flowing by.”Z_Malloc says that time was crucial. Rains were expected later in the day which could wash the ring downriver. He says, “I made some logical guesses about where the mighty AgTitan may have fallen in and focused on the partially submerged log in the middle of the stream. I was really glad I was alone because I bet it was quite funny to see me bent over at the waist in thigh deep water running a metal detector in one hand and feeling the bottom with the other. But after about ten minutes, and on my third hit on the metal detector, my hand brushed something in the moderately packed clay on the bottom.”Z_Malloc recovers the ringZ_Malloc pulled a silt covered ring from the water and kept his sense of humor intact. “I had the ring in my hand. So as I dragged the cache (ring) to the surface. I knew I was going to be FTF…..but NOOOOO the log (inscription) read Erik J. Hulse. All that work and to not get the FTF! So feeling all depressed, I tossed the ring back in the water for the next person to find and walked away.  Just kidding.”Z_Malloc says he got a great story out of the adventure and helped a former Texas A&M alumni and geocacher.AgTitan says that he only found out the ring was recovered when GeoGeex called hours later, “Kenny (geogeex) called me when I was at work because Jeff (Z_Malloc) posted on Facebook that he found my ring.  I didn’t believe Kenny at first, and kept asking him if he was joking with me.  When I realized it was for real, I found Jeff’s number and called thanking him.”AgTitan says he didn’t just receive his ring back – he also earned a new respect for the geocaching community, “It is amazing what geocachers (and Aggies!) will do for one another, even when you hardly know someone.  TFTR (Thanks for the ring!) Jeff!!”GeoGeex, Z_Malloc and AgTitanShare with your Friends:Morelast_img read more

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Black Friday Vs. Cyber Monday: Toward A New Shopping Calendar

first_imgThe Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technology Related Posts What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … christina ortiz Are Black Friday and Cyber Monday fighting a battle neither of them can win? It certainly looks that way as shopping landscape shifst both online and offline. A few holiday seasons down the road, both big-deal days may seem as quaint and dated as Sears Catalogs and keeping stores closed on Sundays. Enter Cyber Monday The term “Cyber Monday” was born during the holiday season of 2005, when the U.S. Trade Association’s National Retail Federation began to notice that shoppers who had just spent the entire Thanksgiving weekend barreling through crowded stores, were cyber-shopping when they sat down at their work computers on the following Monday. The federation’s site Shop.org officially coined the term in 2005 and set up an eponymous site in 2006. Obviously, post-Thanksgiving online shopping at work had been going on long before the NRF put a name on it. But it’s grown into something bigger and more influential, not only changing the way Black Friday works, but also the way retail stores handle the holiday shopping season. Cyber Monday revealed the biggest weakness in the Black Friday concept: brick-and-mortar. What used to be an asset is now hurting this once powerful shopping day as harried workers rebel against early hours and ornery customers fighting over flat screens. Add on the fact that retailers are now expanding Black Friday into Thanksgiving evening, and you’ve got one messed up system. That’s why Black Friday is now projected to be only the second busiest shopping day of the year, behind Cyber Monday. Research from Compuware APM pegs total spending on Cyber Monday at $1.44 billion. But what about Cyber Monday? Does it even make sense?In the modern world, it doesn’t matter what day it is, wherever you are, you can shop the holiday sales from anywhere as long as you’re connected. Most shoppers now have decent Internet connections from home, and as Dan Rowinski pointed out last week, mobile shopping now accounts for about 12% of the purchases made on Cyber Monday. Obviously, you don’t need to be back at work to use your smartphone.Et Tu, Target? So what’s the future of Cyber Monday in a world where office computers are not required to buy online? Retailers are recognizing this and beating Cyber Monday to the punch by starting sales earlier – both online and in store. The sales calendars don’t matter any more, but that doesn’t mean retailers won’t try to leverage the ideas with sales and deals tied to no-longer-relevant concepts.Online-only sites like Amazon are morphing Cyber Monday into Cyber Week. They’re posting new deals every day leading up to Black Friday or during the week following Cyber Monday to help keep the shopping excitement going longer. Brent Shelton, a spokesman for FatWallet, told the Daily Finance Blog that we should be expecting events like “Cyber Monday II” on December 5. Whether it’s longer sales online or in store, the retail calendar we follow today won’t stand the test of time. And that’s probably a good thing compared to getting up at 4am to stand in line at Wal-Mart – or spending your work day on eBay.Image courtesy of Shuttershock.center_img Tags:#Amazon#e-commerce Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagementlast_img read more

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Getting Started with DaVinci Resolve

first_imgWant to try your hand at color grading? Curious about Resolve? This informative video tutorial will get you started.This tutorial is one of the best we’ve seen at providing a comprehensive overview of color grading in DaVinci Resolve (notwithstanding the lackluster audio quality). The tutorial uses the free version of Resolve, DaVinci Resolve Lite, however the techniques and features explained are also applicable for the full version.Highlights of the video tutorial include:Importing media (XML & EDL)Color grading workflowBasic color correctionUsing nodesThis DaVinci Resolve tutorial clocks in at about 45 minutes, but it’s worthwhile viewing for anyone interested in improving their video edits with the industry’s leading color grading application.Thanks to South Korea based Sliced Pictures for sharing this useful Resolve tutorial!last_img read more

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AI flight skids off runway in Pune

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Karni Sena leader agrees to watch Padmaavat

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