Greensky Bluegrass Welcomes Holly Bowling For Grateful Dead’s ‘Eyes Of The World’ [Watch]

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Greensky Bluegrass Welcomes Holly Bowling For Grateful Dead’s ‘Eyes Of The World’ [Watch]

first_imgFresh off the campaign trail, Greensky Bluegrass brought their infectious live sound to Eugene, OR for a performance at the McDonald Theatre last night. Energy was at a high as GSBG threw down in Seattle the previous night, and fans had high hopes for a great night of music.The band certainly did not disappoint, as they had special guest sit-ins from Mimi Naja from Fruition and pianist Holly Bowling for the performance. Naja joined in at the end of set one, accentuating “All Four,” “Santa Fe” and “Reuben’s Train.” Bowling came in for the end of set two, playing “The Four” into Grateful Dead’s “Eyes Of The World.” Bowling also returned for the encore, “Who Is Frederico?”Watch all of Bowling’s sit in, below:There’s also full show audio available for those inclined, as captured by Dean Grabski:Setlist: Greensky Bluegrass at McDonald Theatre, Eugene, OR – 3/26/16:Set 1: Jaywalking, Windshield, Living Over, Against the Days, How Mountain Girls Can Love, All Four*, Santa Fe*, Rueben’s Train*Set 2: Fixin to Ruin, Take Cover, Bring Out Your Dead, Handle With Care, Fo Sho, Uh Huh, Hit Parade of Love, Forget Everything, Broke Mountain Breakdown, The Four% > Eyes of the World%E: Who is Federico?% * w/ Mimi Naja% w/ Holly Bowlinglast_img read more

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Burlington International Airport awarded $2.4 million in recovery funds

first_imgThe U.S. Department of Transportation has awarded $2,424,030 in recovery funding to the Burlington International Airport for taxiway rehabilitation and extension, Sens. Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.) and Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) and Rep. Peter Welch (D-Vt.) announced. The funding will be used to rehabilitate and repave the intersection of two taxiways and to extend a third taxiway. The projects are part of the airport’s multi-phase South End Development program, which will enhance cargo, aircraft maintenance and general aviation capabilities. Airport officials estimate the program could create as many as 350 new jobs at the airport over the next 10 years.The award is the latest federal grant made possible by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, which was signed into law in February.Leahy, Sanders and Welch said, “This federal grant will help Burlington International Airport improve its ability to serve Vermont businesses and passengers alike. Not only will it create construction jobs in the short term, it will also lead to long-term economic development through the continued improvement of the airport.”Airport director Brian Searles said, “All three members of our congressional delegation have been such great partners in the development of this airport, and this grant will help ensure that we are part of the economic recovery. We are very grateful for their work on this much needed grant”. Source: Vermont Congressional delegation. THURSDAY, August 13, 2009 —last_img read more

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High schoolers storm USC to protest Trump

first_imgSeveral hundred middle and high schoolers from the 32nd Street School gathered on campus Thursday afternoon to protest Donald Trump’s victory in the presidential election. They were joined by USC students and faculty as they marched down Trousdale, eventually gathering near Tommy Trojan and chanting “Not our president” and “Si, se puede,” or“yes, we can” in Spanish. Many held signs proclaiming solidarity with minority groups and denouncing Trump and the Republican Party as fascist. Others held up flags from Mexico and El Salvador, expressing solidarity in reference to Trump’s claims that he would deport all 11 million undocumented immigrants currently residing in the U.S.“We are proud of our country,” one protester holding up a Salvadoran flag said in Spanish. “We want to tell Donald Trump that he cannot deport us, and that he cannot destroy us.” Students explained that seniors at the 32nd Street School collectively decided to come to USC in order to “make their voices heard.” “We’re very upset about what happened during the election and how many people were influenced by hate,” said Reginald Albert, a high school senior from the 32nd Street School. Other protestors held up the rainbow flag of the LGBT movement while many chanted “the people united will never be divided.” The group rallied in front of the Student Union, then began to disperse as some moved toward Exposition Park while others marched out onto Figueroa Street. USC students and faculty formed a “human wall” along Trousdale, then gathered around Tommy Trojan to take turns speaking about what the possibility of a Trump presidency means for them.One student said that as an undocumented immigrant, she had been taken in by a white woman who helped her eventually get to USC. She urged students to stay united against hate in the face of divisive rhetoric. “This proves that not everyone is racist,” she said. “There are good people out there.” By 1:00 p.m., the majority of the protesters had moved off campus. A group of around 200 people from USC made its way down Figueroa Street toward Downtown, where A group marched back onto campus near 2:00 p.m. yelling, “F–k Donald Trump” as they moved down Trousdale Parkway toward Tommy Trojan. Late Thursday evening, another group gathered at Tommy Trojan and marched downtown, where they assembled in front of City Hall in further protest.The Office of the Provost issued a statement Thursday evening recognizing the discontent that has spread throughout campus and saying that it would not allow “abuse, threats, harassment, intimidation or violence” targeted toward any members of the USC community. The statement, which was signed by Provost Michael Quick, Vice President for Student Affairs Ainsley Carry and Dean of Religious Life Varun Soni, urged students to report incidents of bias online or through USC’s LiveSafe app. “Given the fact that our community reflects such a profound pluralism of experiences, identities, perspectives, and beliefs, it is inevitable that we will sometimes face deep disagreements regarding fundamental issues,” the email statement said. “However, as a cherished community of scholars and artists, we have the unique opportunity and the shared responsibility to model how we engage, interrogate, and reconcile our differences with civility, respect, and empathy.”last_img read more

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