Property industry shares fall as Parliament is suspended

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Property industry shares fall as Parliament is suspended

first_imgShares in almost every property industry company weakened yesterday as the London stock exchange took fright at Boris Johnson’s successful bid to suspend Parliament next month.Shares in Foxtons, Countrywide, Rightmove, Savills and Purplebricks all dropped yesterday, while shares in The Property Franchise Group, LSL and OnTheMarket saw recent share price rises grind to a halt.Only Belvoir saw an increase during frenzied share trading, rising by just under 1%.The UK’s leading house builders also saw their shares drop including Barratt, Bellway, Persimmon, Redrow and Taylor Wimpey, whose shares fell by up to nearly 4%.City investors are clearly worried that Johnson’s attempt to circumvent parliament and push through a hard Brexit is likely to damage the economy and in particular the fragile housing market.Suspend ParliamentYesterday Boris Johnson successfully requested permission to suspend Parliament during the run up to the October 31 Brexit deadline.The political gamble the move represents has been highlighted by a YouGov pole of 5,734 people following the announcement, which revealed that only 27% backed the suspension of Parliament to force through a Brexit deal.The figures are very different when the poll’s results are focussed in on Conservative and Leave voters, half of whom believe it is acceptable to shut down parliament.Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn has called the move an ‘attempted coup’ and a ‘threat to our democracy’ and, unusually, has been joined by some Conservative MPs in calls for a general election prior to October 31st.Savills and Purplebricks Rightmove Boris Johnson Brexit Countrywide Foxtons August 29, 2019Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021 Home » News » Housing Market » Property industry shares fall as Parliament is suspended previous nextHousing MarketProperty industry shares fall as Parliament is suspendedBoris Johnson’s decision to ask the Queen for permission to extend the summer recess sends shock waves through City investors.Nigel Lewis29th August 201901,197 Viewslast_img read more

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Detailed guide: Maintaining records of staff, customers and visitors to support NHS Test and Trace

first_img amusement arcades art fairs betting shops and bingo halls casinos cinema clubs providing team sporting activities concert venues facilities for use by elite and professional sportspeople (including sports stadia) heritage locations and attractions open to the public (including castles, stately homes and other historic houses) hotels and other guest accommodation provided on a commercial basis, including in bed and breakfast accommodation, boats, campsites, caravans, chalets, guest houses, holiday parks, hostels, motels, pubs, sleeper trains and yurts indoor sport and leisure centres, including gyms outdoor swimming pools and lidos museums and galleries music recording studios open for public hire or other public use public libraries theatres ask every customer or visitor (over the age of 16) to provide their name and contact details keep a record of all staff working on their premises and shift times on a given day and their contact details keep these records of customers, visitors and staff for 21 days and provide data to NHS Test and Trace if requested display an official NHS QR code poster so that customers and visitors can ‘check in’ using the NHS COVID-19 app as an alternative to providing their contact details adhere to General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR) Hospitality venues have additional requirements and must also take reasonable steps to refuse entry to anyone who refuses to participate. What is reasonable will depend on the type of venue and context in question. The venue should satisfy themselves that they have done all that could reasonably be expected to refuse entry.Failure to comply with any of these requirements could result in fixed penalty fines.This guidance provides further instructions on how to fulfil these requirements.NHS Test and TraceNHS Test and Trace is a key part of the country’s ongoing COVID-19 response. If we can rapidly detect people who have recently come into close contact with a new COVID-19 case, we can take swift action to minimise transmission of the virus.NHS Test and Trace includes dedicated contact tracing staff working at national level who work closely with local public health experts. Local public health experts include Public Health England (PHE), health protection teams and local authority public health staff.You can read further information on how NHS Test and Trace works.The purpose of maintaining records and displaying an official NHS QR posterBy maintaining records of staff, customers and visitors, and displaying an official NHS QR poster, you will help NHS Test and Trace to identify and notify people who may have been exposed to the virus.You must register for an official NHS QR code poster and display one at every entrance to your venue.The NHS COVID-19 app has a feature that allows users to quickly and easily ‘check in’ to your venue by scanning the code. In England, you do not have to ask people who choose to ‘check in’ using the official NHS QR code to provide their contact details. If there are 2 or more positive cases who have been in a venue on the same day, a message will be sent to the relevant app users with the necessary public health advice.In addition to maintaining and sharing records where requested and displaying an official NHS QR code poster, you must also continue to follow other government requirements and guidance to minimise the transmission of COVID-19. This includes maintaining a safe working environment and following social distancing guidelines.Sectors that this guidance applies toThere is a higher risk of transmitting COVID-19 in premises where customers and visitors spend a longer time in one place and potentially come into close contact with other people outside of their household.To manage this risk, establishments in the following sectors, whether indoor or outdoor venues or mobile settings, must request contact details from staff, customers and visitors, and display the official NHS QR code poster: This privacy notice is intended for designated venues only. A full list of organisations within scope in these sectors can be found in annex A.This requirement applies to any establishment that provides an on-site service and to any events that take place on its premises. It does not apply where services are taken off site immediately, for example, a food or drink outlet which only provides takeaways. If a business offers a mixture of a sit-in and takeaway service, contact information only needs to be sought for customers who are dining in.This could be asked for at the counter, rather than the point of entry, when servers can more easily ask the customer whether they are dining in or taking away.If you have multiple points of entry you will need to ensure that you have a system that meets the legal requirements. This may mean adapting the way that customers and visitors circulate in your premises.Multi-use premisesIf your business contains several individual venues, then you as the wider venue are still required to collect details of staff, customers and visitors at the main entrance.If your business is within a larger venue then you are only required to collect details of customers, visitors and staff in addition to the main entrance if you are a hospitality service, for example a cafe within a museum.Other types of businesses are not required to collect details, when they exist within a larger premises in scope.CinemasFood and drink sold in cinemas will be considered a takeaway service, and there is no requirement to refuse custom to people who do not provide their contact details or check in with the NHS QR code.Venues with open-plan dining areasSome venues might have communal or open-plan dining areas such as food courts. In this situation, the responsibility lies with the legal owner of the space, who is liable for these requirements.If your business operates within a food court, where food and/or drink is sold and consumed solely in communal dining areas, then you as an individual business owner within the food court are not required to collect details of customers, visitors and staff. However, the legal owner of the wider venue is required to collect visitor details at a designated entrance to the food court. Where an outlet has their own seating area, the legal owner of that outlet is responsible.Workplace canteensWorkplace canteens which are open only to staff at that workplace are not required to collect the details of their staff who visit the canteen.If a workplace canteen may be accessed by members of the public however (for example, anyone who is not an employee), then this venue would be required to collect the details of customers, visitors and staff.Heritage sitesThe requirement to collect contact details does not apply to unstaffed, unticketed heritage sites that are open to the public (for example, ruins or prehistoric sites) or archaeological and historic sites which are not open to the public.Further education settingsIf a venue within a further education college is open to the public, such as a café or swimming pool, then that venue is required to collect details of customers, visitors and staff and to display an official NHS QR code poster.These requirements are not applicable to these venues when they are accessed by students only.Community centres and village hallsCommunity centres and village halls, which may host a variety of social, cultural and recreational activities, must collect information for all activities and events taking place within the venue. This should be collected by the person who hires the space. The venue must also display an official NHS QR code poster which can be used for every activity that takes place there.Places of worshipPlaces of worship, including when the venue is used for events and other community activities, are not included in these regulations but are still strongly encouraged to maintain staff, customer and visitor logs and to display an official NHS QR code poster. Consent should still be sought from individuals entering your establishment.Information to collectVenues must ask every customer and visitor (over the age of 16) for the following details (unless they have ‘checked in’ using the NHS COVID-19 app): How NHS Test and Trace will take steps to minimise transmissionUsing the information you provide from your record of customers, visitors and staff, NHS Test and Trace will take steps to minimise transmission of COVID-19 by notifying individuals of their potential exposure to COVID-19. Depending on how they checked into a venue, this will either be via a text message or a notification in the NHS COVID-19 app.This will not be an instruction to self-isolate. Individuals will simply be notified of potential exposure and reminded of the importance of following the public health advice around washing hands regularly and maintaining social distancing. The venue will not be named. If more than 4 people who tested positive visited the same venue on the same day, we will encourage people to book a test. If a staff member, customer or visitor tells you they have tested positive for COVID-19, you should tell them to stay at home and self-isolate as soon as possible (along with the rest of their household) and encourage the individual to inform NHS Test and Trace of their recent contacts. It is against the law to use the information you have collected to contact people.If you need support to manage an outbreak in your establishment you should contact your local health protection team or environmental health department at your local council to report the suspected outbreak.Registration with the ICO first fixed penalty: £1,000 second fixed penalty: £2,000 third fixed penalty: £4,000 any further penalty notice: £10,000 community centres youth and community centres village halls Recording customer details: how we use your informationTo support NHS Test and Trace (which is part of the Department for Health and Social Care) in England, we have been mandated by law to collect and keep a limited record of staff, customers and visitors who come onto our premises for the purpose of contact tracing.By maintaining records of staff, customers and visitors, and sharing these with NHS Test and Trace where requested, we can help to identify people who may have been exposed to the coronavirus.As a customer/visitor of [insert name of business] you will be asked to provide some basic information and contact details. The following information will be collected: Every organisation or sole trader who processes personal information, including for the purposes of contact tracing for COVID-19, must be registered with the ICO and pay a data protection fee unless they are exempt. If you are unsure whether you need to register, please contact the ICO via their helpline on 0303 123 1113, or visit the ICO website.The cost of the data protection fee depends on the size and turnover of the business, but for most businesses it will cost £40 or £60. The registration form will take around 15 minutes to complete.The ICO has published its own detailed guidance on collecting customer and visitor details for contact tracing.Annex A: full list of settings in scopeHospitality: Local contact tracers may contact you from a different phone number or ask you to call them back. If you are unsure if the telephone number is genuine, check with your local council. More information can be found on your local council website.Contact tracers will never: call you from 0300 013 5000 send you an email containing a template spreadsheet and a secure link to upload your logbook to the secure Egress system barbers beauticians (including those providing cosmetic, aesthetic and wellness treatments) dress fitters, tailors and fashion designers hairdressers nail bars and salons skin and body piercing services sports and massage therapists tattooists ask you to dial a premium rate number to speak to them (for example, those starting 09 or 087) ask you to make any form of payment or purchase a product or any kind ask for any details about your bank account ask for your social media identities or login details, or those of your contacts ask you for any passwords or PINs, or ask you to set up any passwords or PINs over the phone disclose any of your personal or medical information to your contacts ask about protected characteristics that are irrelevant to the needs of NHS Test and Trace provide medical advice on the treatment of any potential coronavirus symptoms ask you to download any software to your PC or ask you to hand over control of your PC, smartphone or tablet to anyone else ask you to access any website that does not belong to the government or NHS The UK is currently experiencing a public health emergency as a result of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. It is therefore critical that organisations take a range of measures to keep everyone safe.Venues in hospitality, the tourism and leisure industry, close contact services, community centres and village halls must:center_img restaurants, including restaurants and dining rooms in hotels or members’ clubs cafes, including workplace canteens bars, including bars in hotels or members’ clubs public houses close contact services, including hairdressers, barbershops and tailors community centres, libraries and village halls Leisure and tourism: hospitality, including pubs, bars, restaurants and cafés tourism and leisure, including hotels, museums, cinemas and amusement arcades the names of all customers or visitors a contact phone number for each customer or visitor date of visit and arrival time and departure time the name of the customer or visitor a contact phone number for each customer or visitor. If a phone number is not available, you should ask for their email address instead, or if neither are available, then postal address date of visit, arrival time and, where possible, departure time the name of the assigned staff member, if a customer or visitor will interact with only one member of staff (for example, a hairdresser). This should be recorded alongside the name of the customer or visitor Close contact services: The person responsible for the organisation is liable. This could be the owner, proprietor or manager with overall responsibility of the organisation, business or service.How records should be maintainedTo support NHS Test and Trace, you must hold records for 21 days. This reflects the incubation period for COVID-19 (which can be up to 14 days) and an additional 7 days to allow time for testing and tracing. After 21 days, this information must be securely disposed of or deleted. When deleting or disposing of data, you must do so in a way that does not risk unintended access (for example shredding paper documents and ensuring permanent deletion of electronic files).Records which are made and kept for other business purposes do not need to be disposed of after 21 days. The requirement to dispose of the data relates to a record that is created solely for the purpose of NHS Test and Trace. All collected data, however, must comply with the General Data Protection Regulation and should not be kept for longer than is necessary.General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)The data that you collect is personal data is and must be handled in accordance with GDPR to protect the privacy of your staff, customers and visitors. This section sets out the steps you can take to comply with GDPR.You need to explain to people why you are collecting this data but this does not mean that you have to inform every customer or visitor individually. You might, for example, display a notice at your premises or on your website setting out what the data will be used for and the circumstances in which it might be accessed by NHS Test and Trace. A template privacy notice can be found in annex B. You may need to offer some people additional support in accessing or understanding this information, for example, if they have a visual impairment or cannot read English.In places of worship, where this is not a legal requirement, consent to collect the data should still be sought from individuals.Personal data that is collected for NHS Test and Trace, which you would not collect in your usual course of business, must be used only to share with NHS Test and Trace. It must not be used for other purposes, including marketing, profiling, analysis or other purposes unrelated to contact tracing, or you will be in breach of GDPR.You should make your staff aware of what they should and shouldn’t do with customer information. You must not misuse the data in a way that is misleading or could cause an unjustified negative impact on people, for example to discriminate against groups of individuals. Misuse of data in this way is a breach of UK GDPR.Appropriate technical and security measures must be in place to protect customer contact information, and the ICO has produced guidance on this. These measures will vary depending on how you choose to hold this information, including whether it is collected in hard copy or electronically. We would prefer you to record and protect information electronically, but we understand this might not be possible.When information should be shared with NHS Test and TraceNHS Test and Trace or Public Health Officers will ask for these records only where it is necessary. For example, when two or more people who later tested positive for COVID-19 visited your premises on the same day.If you are asked to provide these records you must share them with NHS Test and Trace straight away. You are legally required to share this information as soon as possible – you must not delay. If you do not have customer, visitor and staff logbooks to share, or if you do not share these promptly, then this will be reported to your local environmental health officers to investigate further.Once details have been provided, NHS Test and Trace will use this information to let people know that they may have been exposed to COVID-19. Depending on the number of people who tested positive, we may advise them to book a test. It is very important that you do not inform your customers or visitors yourself or this may put you in breach of GDPR.You will be provided clear instructions to follow if you are contacted by NHS Test and Trace. You will not automatically need to close your establishment, but will be given guidance with public health advice and support to follow.If you are contacted by NHS Test and Trace, contact tracers will: Annex B: template privacy notice The government has published the COVID-19 Response – Spring 2021 setting out the roadmap out of the current lockdown for England. This explains how restrictions will be eased over time.From 12 April 2021 some businesses are permitted to reopen.The rules on what you need to do when a group enters your venue have changed. You must ask every customer or visitor to scan the NHS QR code using their NHS COVID-19 app, or provide their name and contact details, not just a lead member of the group.This is to ensure that everyone receives the necessary public health advice in a timely manner. Local authority run services: Recording both arrival and departure times (or estimated departure times) will help reduce the number of customers or staff needing to be contacted by NHS Test and Trace. We recognise, however, that recording departure times will not always be practicable and this is not required by law.All designated venues must also keep a record of all staff working on the premises on a given day, the time of their shift, and their contact details. This covers anyone providing a service or activity including volunteers. Venues must keep these records of staff, but staff can choose to check in using the NHS QR code poster in addition, if they wish.No additional data should be collected for this purpose.In England, you do not have to request details from people who check in with the official NHS QR code poster, and venues should not ask people to do both. Venues must not make the specific use of the NHS QR code a precondition of entry (as the individual has the right to choose to provide their contact details if they prefer).If you are a hospitality venue, you must ask for contact details from anyone who hasn’t scanned the official NHS QR code and you must refuse entry to any customer or visitor who chooses to neither provide their contact details nor scan the official NHS QR code.You should satisfy yourselves that individuals who are checking in using the official NHS QR code have done so – you may do this by asking the individual if they have scanned the code or ask to view the person’s screen to show the venue check-in screen if you still have reason to believe they haven’t done so.Many organisations that routinely take bookings already have systems for recording their customers and visitors – including restaurants, hotels, and hair salons. Due to the COVID-19 outbreak, more organisations have implemented an ‘advanced booking only’ service to manage the numbers of people on the premises. These booking systems can serve as the source of the information that you need to collect. Customers or visitors can still scan the official NHS QR code if they wish, to help remind them where they have been if asked by NHS Test and Trace.You should collect this information in a way that is manageable for your establishment. If not collected in advance, this information should be collected at the point that visitors enter the premises. If possible, this information should be recorded and stored electronically, for example through an online booking system. However, you must make sure that there is a method of checking in that does not rely on the customer using a smartphone or other technology in order not to digitally exclude people without access to these technologies. You must therefore ensure that there is also a way for an individual to provide their contact details if they do not own a smartphone or have access to digital routes. If you are keeping a paper record, this should be out of public sight and stored securely.Most venues will not be required to conduct a data protection impact assessment (DPIA) under the General Data Protection Regulations. The Information Commissioner’s Office has produced a DPIA guide and other guidance to help you minimise data protection risks.You must not use this data for any other purposes other than for NHS Test and Trace, unless you would already collect it for another business purpose. For example, you must not use data collected for NHS Test and Trace for marketing purposes. Misuse of data in this way would constitute a breach of UK GDPR.Displaying an official NHS QR code posterDesignated venues must display an official NHS QR code poster at their entrance. It’s quick and simple to use for both businesses and users, and enables customers and visitors to scan the NHS QR code when they arrive by using the NHS COVID-19 app. Organisations must have a system for individuals who do not have a smartphone or the NHS COVID-19 app to provide their contact details.If an app user chooses to use the QR code check-in feature, you should not ask for their contact details.Official NHS QR code posters can be generated online.Organisations can find out more about NHS QR codes and how to generate them on the NHS COVID-19 app website.The NHS COVID-19 app is only able to scan official NHS QR code posters.In England, if you’re currently using your own QR code system to collect contact details, you should now switch to the official NHS QR code system. By supporting the official NHS system, you’ll be protecting your staff, customers and visitors.If you use any other QR code system at your venue, you must ensure that it does not show any NHS or NHS Test and Trace logos. You should also explain to your customers and visitors that you are using more than one QR code system in your venue. Unofficial QR codes will not work with the NHS COVID-19 app, can cause confusion for visitors, and could result in them missing important public health advice. If you do not have access to a printer, you can display your QR code poster at your venue using digital signage, for example, a TV screen or iPad.If someone does not wish to share their details, provides incorrect information or chooses not to scan the NHS QR codeHospitality venues must take reasonable steps to refuse entry to a customer or visitor who does not provide their name and contact details or who has not scanned the NHS QR code. What is reasonable will depend on the type of venue and context in question. The venue should satisfy themselves that they have done all that could reasonably be expected to refuse entry.Venues in other settings do not need to refuse entry but should strongly encourage customers and visitors to scan the official NHS QR code poster or provide their contact details in order to support NHS Test and Trace. They should advise customers and visitors that this information will only be used where necessary to help stop the spread of COVID-19.If in the rare case that a customer or visitor becomes unruly, you should follow your own security procedures. This may include calling the police if you feel the individual poses a risk to yourself or others.The accuracy of the information provided will be the responsibility of the individual who provides it. You do not have to verify an individual’s identity for NHS Test and Trace purposes, and we advise against doing so except where organisations have a reasonable suspicion that customer or visitor details are incorrect. You may refuse to allow entry if you have reason to believe the details are inaccurate.Exempt visitsYou do not need to ask for contact details or check scanning of the NHS QR code if the person is a police officer or emergency responder on duty.You do not need to ask for contact details for people whose visit is for the sole purpose of making a delivery or collection by supplies or contractors, including food or physical goods.You do not need to ask for contact details for those under the age of 16. If an individual says they are under the age of 16, you should not ask for identification unless you judge this to be false.If someone does not have the mental capacity to provide their contact details, hospitality venues should not refuse entry (where they are normally required to do so). Businesses will not be in breach of the requirements if they have reason to believe someone can’t provide the details for disability reasons and don’t ask for them as a result.Hospitality venues should not deny entry to homeless people who are unable to provide a contact number or email address.Failure to complyCollecting contact details and maintaining records for NHS Test and Trace is a legal requirement and failure to comply is punishable by a fine: The venue/establishment as the data controllers for the collection of your personal data, will be responsible for compliance with data protection legislation for the period of time it holds the information. When that information is requested by the NHS Test and Trace service, the service would at this point be responsible for compliance with data protection legislation for that period of time.The NHS Test and Trace service as part of safeguarding your personal data, has in place technical, organisational and administrative security measures to protect your personal information that it receives from the venue/establishment, that it holds from loss, misuse, and unauthorised access, disclosure, alteration and destruction.In addition, if you only interact with one member of staff during your visit, the name of the assigned staff member will be recorded alongside your information.NHS Test and Trace have asked us to retain this information for 21 days from the date of your visit, to enable contact tracing to be carried out by NHS Test and Trace during that period. We will only share information with NHS Test and Trace if it is specifically requested by them.For example, if another customer at the venue reported symptoms and subsequently tested positive, NHS Test and Trace can request the log of customer details for a particular time period (for example, this may be all customers who visited on a particular day or time-band, or over a 2-day period).We may/will [delete as necessary] require you to pre-book appointments for visits or to complete a form on arrival.Under government guidance, the information we collect may include information which we would not ordinarily collect from you and which we therefore collect only for the purpose of contact tracing. Information of this type will not be used for other purposes, and NHS Test and Trace will not disclose this information to any third party unless required to do so by law (for example, as a result of receiving a court order). In addition, where the information is only collected for the purpose of contact tracing, it will be destroyed by us 21 days after the date of your visit.However, the government guidance may also cover information that we would usually collect and hold onto as part of our ordinary dealings with you (perhaps, for example, your name, date of birth and phone number). Where this is the case, this information only will continue to be held after 21 days and we will use it as we usually would, unless and until you tell us not to.Your information will always be stored and used in compliance with the relevant data protection legislation.The use of your information is covered by the General Data Protection Regulations Article 6 (1) (c) – a legal obligation to which we as a venue/establishment are subject to. The legal obligation to which we’re subject, means that we’re mandated by law, by a set of new regulations from the government, to co-operate with the NHS Test and Trace service, in order to help maintain a safe operating environment and to help fight any local outbreak of corona virus.[Venue/establishment, please add text on whether or not you transfer personal data outside the UK, the EU or to anywhere else (if known).]By law, you have a number of rights as a data subject, such as the right to be informed, the right to access information held about you and the right to rectification of any inaccurate data that we hold about you.You have the right to request that we erase personal data about you that we hold (although this is not an absolute right).You have the right to request that we restrict processing of personal data about you that we hold in certain circumstances.You have the right to object to processing of personal data about you on grounds relating to your particular situation (also again this right is not absolute).If you are unhappy or wish to complain about how your information is used, you should contact a member of staff in the first instance to resolve your issue.If you are still not satisfied, you can complain to the Information Commissioner’s Office. Their website address is www.ico.org.uk.[Please insert the data protection officer details or whoever is in charge of data protection duties of your venue/establishment.]We keep our privacy notice under regular review, and we will make new versions available on our privacy notice page on [your venue/establishment website]. This privacy notice was last updated on [date you created or updated this privacy notice].last_img read more

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Watch Twiddle’s Ryan Dempsey Surprise Guest With Holly Bowling For Mesmerizing ‘Harry Hood’

first_imgLast night, Twiddle made their debut at The Capitol Theatre for a sold-out show with TAUK, and special guest Matisyahu. The pre-party was spent at Garcia’s, while the one-and-only jamband concert pianist Holly Bowling displayed her impeccable talents. Riveting as ever, she performed a perfectly pleasing balance of Phish and Grateful Dead tunes.Twiddle Debuts New Song, Welcomes Matisyahu For Sold-Out Capitol Theatre Show [Videos/Review]The set closed with a surprise special guest appearance from Twiddle’s own Ryan Dempsey. The two had a blast tackling “Harry Hood” together in their show-stopping performance. With Bowling holding down the melodies, Dempsey took lead in a tastefully beautiful Hood jam. Watch how it all went down:Holly Bowling @ Garcia’s 5/7/16 Setlist:My Friend, My Friend, Help on the Way > Slipknot! > Theme from the Bottom > Randall’s Chalkdust Jam > Theme from the Bottom > Slipknot! > Franklin’s Tower, It’s Ice, A Song I Heard the Ocean Sing > Terrapin Station Suite, Taste, Harry Hood** w/ Ryan Dempsey from Twiddlelast_img read more

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