Donegal businessman says commercial rates will be made a local election issue

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Donegal businessman says commercial rates will be made a local election issue

first_img A Twin Town’s businesses man has rejected claims from Councillor Cora Harvey that a cut in rates can’t come from Donegal County Council.The Twin Town’s Chamber of Commerce wants a 25% cut in commercial rates to help struggling businesses, but Councillor Harvey says local services would lose investment if it came from the local authority.Charlie Ferry runs Supervalu in Ballybfoey, he says that is not true and Donegal County Council needs to do someting to help businesses in the county – he says they are prepared to make it an election issue:[podcast]http://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/charrawRATES.mp3[/podcast] Twitter News LUH system challenged by however, work to reduce risk to patients ongoing – Dr Hamilton Almost 10,000 appointments cancelled in Saolta Hospital Group this week Facebook Pinterest WhatsApp Twitter Three factors driving Donegal housing market – Robinson Guidelines for reopening of hospitality sector published Previous articleFoyle MLA says the time is right for an All-Ireland Tourism AuthorityNext articleOireachtas Committee:Social network bullying not soley responsible for teen suicides News Highland center_img By News Highland – July 18, 2013 WhatsApp RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Donegal businessman says commercial rates will be made a local election issue Pinterest Facebook Google+ Calls for maternity restrictions to be lifted at LUH Google+ Business Matters Ep 45 – Boyd Robinson, Annette Houston & Michael Margeylast_img read more

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CONNECTIONS bt Jim Redwine

first_imgFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare Gavel Gamut By Jim Redwinewww.jamesmredwine.comCONNECTIONSFather George Rapp of Pennsylvania and Robert Owen of New Lanark, Scotland each hoped their visions for Mankind would manifest in New Harmony, Indiana. Rapp’s vision involving Christ’s Second Coming and Owen’s involving a world without any traditional religions look different but have similar dreams at their base. A world without private property ownership was one of the major goals for both.I will leave an analysis of Rapp’s grand plans to the theologians. As to Owen’s, I defer to the philosophers but will refer to Robert Owen, A View of Society and Other Writings edited by Gregory Glaeys who is a Professor of History at Royal University of London and a recognized authority on Robert Owen.According to Glaeys, Robert Owen (1771-1858) was one of the greatest British social reformers and was a pioneer in schemes for humane factory management, the eight-hour workday and the education of the poor. Owen even now remains respected as a pioneer socialist, feminist and advocate of an ecological approach to industry and urban life.One of the most interesting ironies of the connections between the philosophies of Rapp and Owen and New Lanark and New Harmony is that the clergy was one of Owen’s fiercest opponents. Yet elements of Rapp’s Christian thought and Owen’s abhorrence of Christianity and all other organized religions intertwine, especially their mutual calls for a new world order and disdain for economic competition and individualism. Perhaps that was why and how Owen and Rapp knew of one another and what led to Owen in New Lanark, Scotland buying Rapp’s town of New Harmony, Indiana.Glaeys describes that transaction as follows:“In 1825 he (Owen) purchased a ready-made community set on 20,000 acres in southern Indiana from a pietistic German sect, the Rappites. At New Harmony he spent about 40,000 pounds (about $240,000) or four fifths of his New Lanark fortune in a fruitless effort to organize a disparate group of about 800 radicals, freethinkers, backwoodsmen and scientists.”p. xviUnfortunately, too many of the 800 thought Owen’s utopian concept simply meant they could do nothing and Owen would support them. These ingrates had ample reason for this attitude based on Owen’s own creed as set forth in his Manifesto:“Individual and national competition and contest are the best modes (under the then existing circumstances) by which wealth can be created and distributed.….But it is obtained by creating and calling into full action, the most inferior feelings, the meanest faculties, the worst passions, and the most injurious vices which can be cultivated in human nature.”p. 358Owen sought a system of production and distribution that called for “…[T]he least labour to all members of a society, and especially with the least amount of unhealthy and disagreeable employment.”Well, Gentle Reader, you can probably see how such an experiment might turn out. You are right. In about two years Owen’s heaven on earth was more akin to Purgatory. And Owen’s insistence on a strict compliance to his principles on his terms did not engender enthusiastic compliance. Or as the ancient Greeks might have observed, hubris is a mortal flaw.There is so much more to Robert Owen and the symbiotic relationship between New Lanark, Scotland and New Harmony, Indiana than can be crammed within a few newspaper columns. However if you care to hang around awhile I plan to cram some stuff into my next few epistles.But before the following weeks’ offerings, I must address last week’s column thanks to our friend and Robert Owen authority, Linda Warrum from New Harmony. Linda read last week’s column and offered some advice. First, Linda, thanks for reading Gavel Gamut; you have doubled my audience. Secondly, thanks for pointing out not all of Robert Owen’s children were given the middle name of Dale and Father Rapp’s group were not German Lutherans but Pietists who, “…[E]mphasized personal piety over religious formality and the orthodoxy of the Lutheran Church.” It was nice of Linda to both read Gavel Gamut and respond.For more Gavel Gamut articles go to:www.jamesmredwine.comlast_img read more

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University awards 2012 Laetare Medal

first_imgKen Hackett, former president of Catholic Relief Services (CRS), will receive the 2012 Laetare Medal during the 2012 Commencement Ceremony. The Medal, established at Notre Dame in 1883, is the oldest and most prestigious honor given to American Catholics. It is awarded annually to a Catholic “whose genius has ennobled the arts and sciences, illustrated the ideals of the Church and enriched the heritage of humanity,” according to a University press release. University President Fr. John Jenkins praised Hackett’s compassion and strong commitment to worldwide outreach throughout his tenure at CRS. “Ken Hackett has responded to a Gospel imperative with his entire career,” Jenkins said in the press release. “His direction of the Catholic Church’s outreach to the hungry, thirsty, naked, sick and unsheltered of the world has blended administrative acumen with genuine compassion in a unique and exemplary way.” After serving CRS in various capacities since 1972, including a stint as its regional director for Africa and in several posts throughout Africa and Asia, Hackett was appointed president of CRS in 1993, according to the press release. He held the position for 18 years until his retirement in December. Hackett was succeeded by Carolyn Woo, former dean of the Mendoza College of Business.  Hackett, a native of West Roxbury, Mass., became interested in international service when he enrolled in the Peace Corps following his graduation from Boston College in 1968 because he said “it seemed like an interesting thing to do.” Hackett’s experiences living in a Catholic mission and working in an agricultural cooperative project in rural Ghana demonstrated the “actual impact of American food aid on the health and well-being of very poor kids in a very isolated part of a West African country,” he said in the press release.  After completing his Peace Corps assignment, he continued his commitment to service by beginning his CRS career in Sierra Leone, where he administered both a maternal and child health program and a nationwide leprosy control program.  While serving as CRS regional director for Africa, Hackett addressed the agency’s response to the Ethiopian famine of 1984-85 and supervised CRS operations in East Africa during the Somalian crisis of the 1990s, according to the press release.  During his tenure as the agency’s sixth president, Hackett oversaw the redoubling of CRS efforts to engage the American Catholic community in worldwide service work by reaching out to Catholic organizations, dioceses, parishes, and colleges and universities throughout the country. CRS also incorporated lay people into its board of directors under Hackett’s supervision. The organization, one of the world’s most effective and efficient in global relief and development, now operates in more than 100 countries with a staff of nearly 5,000, according to the press release.  In addition to his service as CRS president, Hackett also served as the North America president of Caritas Internationalis, the coalition of humanitarian agencies of the Catholic Church. He continues to serve as an adviser to the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops and as a board member of the Vatican Pontifical Commission Cor Unum. Hackett was awarded an honorary degree from Notre Dame in 2007. He also holds honorary degrees from Boston College, Cabrini College, University of Great Falls, College of Notre Dame of Maryland, Mount St. Mary’s University, New York Medical College, Siena College, University of San Diego, Santa Clara University, Villanova University and Walsh University. The Laetare Medal is named in celebration of Laetare Sunday, the fourth Sunday in Lent and the day Notre Dame announces its recipient each year. The 2011 Medal was jointly awarded to Sr. Joan McConnon and Sr. Mary Scullion, founders of Project H.O.M.E. Previous recipients include President John F. Kennedy, Catholic Worker founder Dorothy Day, Cardinal Joseph Bernardin and jazz composer Dave Brubeck.last_img read more

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New Eduabiase record 1-0 over Diables Noirs

first_imgNew Edubiase United beat Congolese side Diables Noirs 1-0 on Sunday at the Accra Sports Stadium in the CAF Confederation Cup preliminary round qualifier.Striker Alhassan Nuhu opened scoring with a header in the 10th minute.Edubiase, making their debut appearance in continental action paraded a strong side that featured former Ghana youth international Nasir Lamine, former Kotoko forward Stephen Manu and Asiedu Attobrah.The Bekwai-based side expressed total dominance from defence to attack from the start and their persistence in front of goal was rewarded.Skipper Asiedu Attobrah weighted in a cross from the right forNuhu to connect home with a well placed header.After the opener, Anthony Commey’s men took the game to their opponents in search of more goals but they failed. Striker Stephen Manu had four clear chances but his profligacy was beyond measure.His horrible afternoon was summed up when he was replaced in the 54th minute.Edubiase huffed and puffed to add at least a goal but he appeared somehow solidified at the back.last_img read more

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Sanford ends GOP challenge to Trump 2020

first_imgDES MOINES — Former South Carolina Governor Mark Sanford is ending his long-shot G-O-P challenge of President Trump’s reelection.During a news conference on the steps of New Hampshire’s statement, Sanford said because of the impeachment fight, there is “no appetite” among Republicans for a “nuanced conversation” about the country’s mounting fiscal crisis. Sanford has warned the country is headed for a “financial storm” because of the spending decisions that are being made in Washington.Sanford began making trips to Iowa late this summer, but he recently announced New Hampshire would be the home base for his long-shot campaign.Two other Republicans have announced they’re challenging President Trump for the GOP’s 2020 presidential nomination. Former Massachusetts Governor Bill Weld campaigned at the Iowa State Fair. Former Illinois Congressman Joe Walsh has made a few trips to Iowa this fall.last_img read more

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N.Y. subway hero settles lawsuit against his own lawyer

first_imgNEW YORK – A commuter hailed as a hero for saving a teenager who fell in front of a subway train has settled with his own lawyer over lawsuits they filed against each other. Wesley Autrey Sr. had accused lawyer Diane L. Kleiman and her business partner Marc Antonio Esposito, of Marco Antonio Productions, of having him sign an unfair contract that gave them most of any money he earned because of his fame. Kleiman, meanwhile, sued Autrey for legal fees and compensation for damage to her reputation. She denied that she cheated the 50-year-old construction worker and said he made her look like a money-hungry crook. The agreement, called a stipulation, voided all agreements, whether oral or in writing, involving Autrey, Kleiman and Esposito and ended their dueling lawsuits. State Supreme Court Justice Bernard J. Fried signed off on the stipulation and filed it last week. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREStriving toward a more perfect me: Doug McIntyre Autrey caught the public’s attention Jan. 2, 2007, after a 19-year-old film student had a seizure and fell onto the subway tracks at a Manhattan station. Autrey, on the platform with other commuters as a train approached, leaped down and pulled the teen into the foot-deep drainage trough between the tracks and lay on top of him as the train passed over their heads. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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Will 49ers visit to Denver help reverse travel nightmares?

first_imgThe 49ers’ month ahead is jam packed with business trips to start hawking their football worth.Business needs to pick up.Not only did they go 0-8 away from Levi’s Stadium last season, the 49ers have lost every away game before December in each season since 2014.SANTA CLARA, CA – AUGUST 17: A general view during a preseason game between the San Francisco 49ers and Denver Broncos at Levi’s Stadium on August 17, 2014 in Santa Clara, California. (Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)They landed …last_img read more

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A climate made for sport

first_img20 May 2004Many factors need to combine to produce peak performances from athletes. Some things can be controlled, others are beyond human control. Weather is one of those things.Having the right training equipment, having the right facilities, having the right mental approach to sport helps athletes to excel. Having ideal conditions for sport is another huge factor in determining how successful an athlete will be.South Africans have a great advantage because the country’s climate is a wonderful advertisement for the outdoor lifestyle. In recent years, top athletes from far afield have begun to discover how good it is, too.Athletics stars like Maria Mutola, Kelly Holmes, Gabriela Szabo, Michael Johnson, Tim Montgomery and Frank Fredericks have used the country as a winter training base, and it has served them well.The country’s climate encourages its people to get outside, to be active, to participate in some sort of sporting challenge.And the list of available sports goes well beyond the country’s “big three” (rugby, soccer and cricket): try archery, angling, baseball, biathlon, bowls, canoeing, climbing, cycling, duathlon, equestrianism, freediving, inflatable boating, lifesaving, orienteering, polocrosse, rowing, snow sports, softball, swimming, triathlon, volleyball, waterskiing … the list goes on.There’s enough variation in South Africa’s climate to allow for cold weather sports to be practised. The real winner, though, is definitely the country’s sunshine.Some years back, when Alex Braun was media liaison manager for the Springboks, I managed to sit down with him and have a long chat. Braun is an Australian, and at that time Australia was, it seemed, winning nearly everything worldwide in a wide variety of sports.I asked Braun why this was; his answer was that it lay in the sunny conditions Down Under. It made the people tough and hardnosed, he said, perfect attributes for top sportspeople.Recently, while researching golf tourism in the country, I telephoned people at golf clubs around the country to find out what was attracting golfers to South Africa’s shores. One answer was given without fail: the country’s weather.Golf estates have taken off in recent times, and especially in the coastal regions foreigners have been quick to snap up prime properties located alongside top class courses.Top sports stars have got in on the act too. Golfing superstars Ernie Els and Nick Price own properties on the southern Cape coast, while Mount Edgcombe in Kwazulu-Natal is well known as home to many of rugby’s Sharks players.It’s obvious: sport and the South African climate go hand-in-hand. Want to use this article in your publication or on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

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Major award for South African film

first_img27 October 2010 South African production Skeem scooped the coveted Audience Choice Award at the recent Abu Dhabi Film Festival, showing that locally directed movies are holding their own among global industry heavyweights. The festival ran from 13 to 22 October. The film will be released in South African theatres on 28 October. Made by South African Tim Greene, Skeem was up against films with big-name directors like Martin Scorsese, Wim Wenders, George Clooney, Steven Soderbergh, Werner Hertzog and Terry Gilliam. The Audience Choice Award came with US$50 000 (around R400 000) in prize money.‘A film that people would want to see’ Greene said: “I set out to make a film that people would want to see, and so to know that they enjoyed it, is immensely gratifying. If you look at the cast lists of the films we were competing against, they’re all A-list Hollywood celebs.” Greene added that the honour made him proud of South African stars and that he was humbled by the recognition. This is Greene’s second feature film after 2004’s A Boy Called Twist, which centred around a young Cape Town beggar and was based on Charles Dickens novel Oliver Twist.All-South African cast The film, set in a rundown resort, follows the comedic exploits of a group of small-time crooks and greedy holidaymakers as they try to get their hands on a box full of money. It boasts an all-star South African cast who have featured in some of the biggest films made in South Africa. They include: Kenneth Nkosi, Rapulana Seiphemo, Casey B Dolan, Grant Swanby, Terence Bridgett, Zikhona Sodlaka, David Isaacs and Kurt Schoonraad Zaheer Goodman-Bhyat, the film’s producer, said: “To actually win the audience award is a dream come true. To think that our local comedy film can travel and can be relevant to a global audience and compete successfully with the best films in the world gives me hope for the future of South African films.” Bhyat added that the nomination in itself was an honour.Made in the Middle East The Abu Dhabi Film Festival (ADFF) has been an annual event since 2007, with the aim of livening up film culture in the Middle East. When it was started it was known as the Middle East International Film Festival, with a commitment to showcasing work by filmmakers from that region. This has changed to include international films. This year saw films, producers, directors and actors being honoured in the following categories: the Narrative Feature Competition; New Horizons Competition; Documentary Feature Competition; Our World Competition; ADFF Audience Choice Award; ADFF Fipresci Award, and ADFF Netpac Award. Awards with the highest prize money of $100 000 went to the: Best Narrative Film, Chicken with Plums by Marjane Satrapi; Best Film, Stories Only Exist When Remembered by Julia Murat; and Best Documentary, Position Among the Stars by Leonard Retel Helmrich.SA’s booming film industry South African films are notching up top honours at international festivals and award shows, which is testament to the country’s growing and vibrant industry. Hollywood has even used South Africa for film locations, with the next James Bond movie being filmed in Cape Town. Other big-budget Hollywood films that have been filmed on location are Lord of War starring Nicolas Cage and Blood Diamond with Leonardo DiCaprio. This has had a ripple effect with South African actors and actresses getting parts in international productions. These include Terry Pheto in The Bold and the Beautiful and Nondumiso Tembe in True Blood. Tsotsi, directed by South African Gavin Hood, gave Pheto an international boost after it won an Academy Award for best foreign language film in 2006. The gritty drama focuses on the life of a young gangster from Soweto. First published by MediaClubSouthAfrica.com – get free high-resolution photos and professional feature articles from Brand South Africa’s media service.last_img read more

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Building for Reduced Flood Risk

first_imgExpand capacity with natural systemsAvoid building in flood zones. Flood zones are expanding — often faster than revisions to zoning regulations, meaning that simply following the law relative to the siting of buildings may not be enough. Instead of designing to 100-year floods, consider designing to 500-year floods, seeking civil engineering or surveyor assistance as needed.Expand stormwater management capacity and rely on natural systems. More intense storms will strain the capacity of standard stormwater management infrastructure in some areas. Provide larger stormwater conveyance and detention basins, and try to rely on natural features, constructed wetlands, and other ecologically based systems to manage stormwater. “Restore the ecological services of the landscape,” says Watson. Global weirding could bring more floods …As we think about our built environment in light of these events, we have to consider the reality of climate change. Some people prefer to refer to “global warming” as “global weirding,” because our climate is a complex system, and all kinds of odd storms and weather patterns may erupt. It won’t just be a linear ride of slightly higher-than-average temperatures.As water temperatures rise in the South Atlantic, tropical storm systems will pick up more energy, resulting in higher-magnitude hurricanes on the Gulf Coast and Eastern seaboard. Elsewhere, changing precipitation patterns are expected to deliver more rainfall in intense storms that could result in river flooding. … While development makes our landscapes less absorptiveTo complicate matters, development has made our landscapes less able to absorb rainfall, says architect Don Watson, who is writing a book on “design for resilience.” Watson says, “We’ve taken away all the absorptive capacity of our landscapes.” Adapting to climate change will require making our buildings more resilient to storms and flooding. In the longer term, we need to prepare for rising sea levels and restoring the ability of our land to absorb water.While it may be cold (and wet) comfort to owners and residents in damaged buildings, here are some tips for adapting to increased flooding, adapted from “Design for Adaptation: Living in a Climate-Changing World,” an Environmental Building News article by Alex Wilson and Andrea Ward.  A lot can change in two hours. At 8 a.m. Sunday, I walked the length of our half-mile driveway here in southern Vermont, checking the culverts and water bars, all fortified and cleared the day before. All good. The brook next to our driveway was raging, but staying within its banks. The Green River was doing the same across the town road.At 10 a.m., I got a call from my neighbor that my other neighbor’s house was flooding and they’d had to get out. Going back down the driveway with the hope of helping them, I found that the brook had grown to 10 times its usual width, filling the valley that this tranquil little brook usually meanders through. The Green River had done the same, covering the road and making it impossible to get anywhere. Friends who had been excited about rafting the swollen rivers canceled their plans after watching whole trees float by, and hearing boulders roll through the river.The flooding crested before the neighbor’s home was seriously damaged, but the road is badly washed out. For everyone affected by flooding in the Northeast connected to Hurricane Irene, my heart goes out to you. As I’ve been pulling together with my neighbors to adapt to these events, I’ve been wishing the best for everyone else in doing the same. As you know, it will be a long-term effort here.center_img Design to survive extreme windsDesign buildings to survive extreme winds. Examples of specific measures that impart good wind resistance to a building include:installing impact-resistant windows (compliant with Miami-Dade Protocols PA 201, PA 202, and PA 203) or exterior shutters;installing outward-opening doors that are less likely to be pushed inward in intense wind;designing walls to resist uplift using hurricane strapping and other metal fasteners that provide a continuous load path from foundation to roof;anchoring walls properly to foundations or frost walls;designing walls to resist shear and lateral forces using engineered wall bracing or shear panels for frame walls and proper use of re-bar for masonry walls;designing roof geometries (such as hip roofs) that are less prone to wind damage than gable roofs; installing continuous roof underlayment;properly installing high-strength roof sheathing (such as 5â„8″ plywood) that will resist uplift; andspecifying roofing that has been tested to ASTM standards for wind resistance.Raise buildings off the ground. In flood-prone areas — even where flooding is only remotely possible — raise buildings or living spaces above ground level to minimize damage in the event of flooding. With any type of pier foundation, use great care to ensure that energy performance and airtightness are not compromised; raised floors are notoriously difficult to insulate and seal. Specify materials and components to survive floodingSpecify materials that can survive flooding. Especially in locations where flooding or hurricane damage is likely, use materials that can get wet and then dry out with minimal damage. Such materials include preservative-treated sills and wood framing, fiberglass-faced rather than paper-faced drywall, and tile or resilient flooring rather than carpeting.Install specialized components to protect buildings from flooding or allow flooding with minimal damage. Breakaway wall panels on pier foundations in flood-prone areas can allow floodwaters to pass under a house without destroying it. Flood vents (permanent openings in foundation walls) allow floodwaters to escape. Specialized flood barriers, including removable barriers for entrances, can keep rising floodwaters out in certain situations.Elevate mechanical and electrical equipment. To minimize damage — and danger — from flooding, elevate mechanical equipment, electrical panels, and other equipment above a reasonably expected flood level. Even if the whole building can’t be elevated to such a level, it may be cost-effective to elevate just the equipment.Please share below your flood survival stories and thoughts on adapting to global weirding!Tristan Roberts is Editorial Director at BuildingGreen, Inc., in Brattleboro, Vermont, which publishes information on green building solutions.last_img read more

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