Philly Funk Band Swift Technique Makes Appearance In Orange Is The New Black Finale

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Philly Funk Band Swift Technique Makes Appearance In Orange Is The New Black Finale

first_imgFans everywhere have been excited to binge watch the new season of Orange Is The New Black, which was released by Netflix on Friday, June 17th. We were delighted to learn that one of our favorite Philly bands, Swift Technique, was featured in the final episode of this season. The group answered a casting call with a YouTube video and got the gig, only to rock out for the cast on set.Bassist Jake Leschinsky shares some thoughts of his experience with us.“We had an absolute blast working with the cast & crew of Orange Is The New Black. It was an honor to be called upon by this particular show that is currently on the cutting edge of modern television. The opportunity was twofold – we spent an intensive day in the studio cutting a track for the show & we spent one day filming on set. The project materialized very quickly and we even had to cancel a high profile show. When all was said and done, I was so proud to see our guys rise to the occasion and absolutely knock this out of the park.”Congrats to Swift Technique!For fans of their funk, don’t miss the band performing a tribute to Prince at Brooklyn’s The Hall At MP, supporting an all-star “James Brown Vs. Prince” super jam session with members of Lettuce, Trey Anastasio Band, Rubblebucket, Turkuaz and more. The show is this Wednesday, June 22nd, and more information can be found here. The band will then head to the Ardmore Music Hall on June 24th for a performance alongside Con Brio, so don’t miss out! More info can be found here.last_img read more

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Affordable housing, saved

first_imgRepresentatives from the state, Harvard University, and the city of Cambridge joined with elected officials, affordable-housing advocates, and local residents on Feb. 8 to celebrate preserving the affordability of 25 homes in Chapman Arms Apartments in Harvard Square.The success resulted from a partnership between the city and Harvard, since the University holds the ground lease for the building, and the agreement was the first implementation of the state’s new preservation statute, Chapter 40 T.“The accomplishment of preserving affordable units in the heart of Harvard Square is such a tribute to the commitment of the Cambridge City Council,” said Bob Healy, city manager, who is also the managing trustee of the Cambridge Affordable Housing Trust and has worked to strengthen affordable housing during his 30 years with the city. “It’s also important to remember all that Harvard has done in partnership with the city of Cambridge in the area of affordable housing.”“This is what it means to preserve homes, and it’s not just preserving where people sleep at night, but how they live their lives,” said Marjorie Decker, the Cambridge city counselor who received word last spring that the apartments were in jeopardy. The officials had gathered for the celebration in a crowded room at the Harvard Kennedy School.Last April, residents of Chapman Arms, which is also known as Craigie Arms, grew concerned when their apartment building of 25 affordable units was put up for sale. With affordability restrictions on the units scheduled to expire in 2016, the units were an attractive investment for buyers interested in converting them to market-rate housing.Cambridge officials, residents, Harvard, affordable-housing advocates, developers, funders, and the state all participated in solving the problem.Working together, the city, Harvard, and the nonprofit Homeowner’s Rehab Inc. (HRI) were able to orchestrate HRI’s purchase of the building to ensure affordability of the 25 units for a minimum of 50 years. Harvard amended and extended its ground lease on the property in a manner that allowed HRI to secure the necessary financing from the Cambridge Affordable Housing Trust and the Community Economic Development Assistance Corporation (CEDAC). HRI purchased the building in a preservation transaction that was finalized on Dec. 19.Attending the ceremony were Cambridge City Manager Robert W. Healy (from left), Harvard Vice President for Campus Services Lisa Hogarty, Cambridge City Councilor Marjorie Decker, Undersecretary of the DHCD Aaron Gornstein, Executive Director of HRI Peter Daly, and Executive Director of CEDAC Roger Herzog.Chapman Arms was the first preservation acquisition to utilize Chapter 40T, the state’s new innovative expiring-use law that was pushed through by housing advocates and elected officials, including Rep. Kevin Honan of Allston-Brighton and longtime Rep. Alice Wolf of Cambridge, who spearheaded passing the legislation.Healy noted Harvard’s long history of supporting affordable housing in Cambridge, from the sale in the 1990s of 100 units to the city for the below-market rate of $32,000 each, to the creation of the 20/20/2000 program, a $20 million, 20-year, low-interest, revolving loan program that has helped to create 465 affordable units in Cambridge. He also acknowledged Harvard’s involvement in the effort, as holder of the ground lease on the property, which allowed the deal to come together.“It’s always nice to thank your host, but they deserve it,” said Healy. “They really have been a key player in the support of affordable housing in Cambridge for a very long time.”Lisa Hogarty, Harvard’s vice president for campus services, lauded the town-gown partnership, saying, “The city of Cambridge and Harvard have enjoyed a long and successful track record of working together to address the quality of life in the city. By any measure, Chapman Arms is an affordable-housing success story.”For Chapman Arms resident Linda Jordon, the success story is personal, since “This means 25 people will have a home.”last_img read more

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Fiammetta: As Watt fades away, his replacements come into focus

first_imgIn a way, J.J. Watt is now everywhere and nowhere.He’s made appearances in Gatorade commercials, juggled private workouts and preparations for Thursday’s NFL Draft and still managed to make his way back to Wisconsin, manning the sidelines in Saturday’s spring game and spending the second half signing autographs. Typically regarded as a first-round draft prospect, Watt is making the proverbial rounds, running the gamut of pre-draft activities top prospects are mercilessly subjected to.Where he’s not, though, is with the Badgers. He didn’t spend the spring grinding his way through 15 practices, and he didn’t join in embarrassing UW’s quarterbacks in the spring game. Watt, of course, won’t be suiting up for the Badgers come Sept. 1, when the UNLV Rebels invade Camp Randall Stadium for the 2011 season opener. Wherever he’s drafted, Watt will be spending the fall chasing bigger, faster, more talented quarterbacks.So, the Badgers will move on without one of the most talented players to come through the program in the last decade. If this spring is any indication – sometime it is, sometimes it isn’t – they plan to do so with a platoon of defensive ends. Louis Nzegwu, a fifth-year senior, started all 13 games last season and returns as Wisconsin’s most experienced defensive end (34 career games played). David Gilbert, a junior, has appeared in 25 career games. Brendan Kelly, another redshirt junior, has played in only 11 career games, but he figures to be a significant part of the rotation following an impressive spring.Together, the trio has amassed a combined 99 tackles (12 for loss) and eight sacks in their careers. Last season – which was Kelly’s redshirt season – they combined for 67 tackles (nine for loss) and 4.5 sacks.Watt, in the two seasons he took the field for UW, recorded 106 tackles (36.5 for loss) and 11.5 sacks. Last season, he had 62 tackles (21 for loss) and seven sacks.There’s also the matter of leadership, which anyone with a Twitter account or a DBWH wristband will tell you Watt was extraordinary at. But strictly on the field, it’s painfully clear Watt has left a void much larger than his own 6-foot-6, 292-pound frame at defensive end.So while the Badgers don’t necessarily face the question of replacing Watt – at least, not immediately – they’re certainly tasked with replicating that production. Fortunately for the defensive ends, and really, the entire defense, Watt’s presence has lingered.“The best thing about J.J. is he’s real good friends with all of us,” Kelly said. “He’s giving us tips and stuff, so he’s helping us get better as well. He was a great player for us and he did a lot, he produced a lot for us. The best thing about that is taking that challenge upon yourself and saying, ‘You know what, I’m going to be that guy, I’m going to get better today and be that guy.’”That tireless work ethic made Watt, a former Pewaukee pizza boy, a likely first-round draft prospect. Now, it could do the same to the current band of UW defensive ends.Kelly himself could be a likely candidate to follow in the once-unheralded Watt’s steps. Maybe he won’t post the same numbers, but Kelly quickly became one of the most talked-about Badgers in spring camp. His hustle, tenacity and team-first mindset largely echoed Watt’s, and his emergence dissolved many of the questions surrounding the position group. Wisconsin’s depth at defensive end, a concern entering the spring, is now a strength.“Right now, I see David Gilbert, Louis Nzegwu and I rotating as ones,” Kelly said. “It’s kind of been a competition that’s been going on, and it stems back from before, when I was hurt for a while. David and Louis had a big fight for a starting position [at] the other end of J.J. I saw that, kind of sat back, but at the same time, I was eager and chomping at the bit to get into that fight for that spot.”Make no mistake: Kelly hasn’t remotely earned that spot yet. Neither has anyone on the defense, or the entire team. After suffering injuries each of his first two years at UW, Kelly was a logical redshirt option last season. He’s certainly not yet a household name on Wisconsin’s defense, as partially evidenced by the significantly smaller (compared to that of Nzegwu and Gilbert) crowd of reporters encircling him after Saturday’s game.Regardless, Kelly and the rest of the defensive ends are aware of the task ahead of them. Watt was a superhero at Wisconsin, never failing to don his cape as the unanimous leader that was looked up to during both good and bad. So far, neither Kelly, Nzegwu nor Gilbert has flashed signs of echoing Watt’s personality or leadership. On the field, they still have a lot to prove.But any sort of substitution for or recreation of Watt’s production will begin on the field, and that’s something his replacements are well aware of.“We definitely have a different defense schematically with Chris Ash being a coordinator and Charlie Partridge,” Kelly said. “But I think when it comes down to it, football’s football. They’re just going to line you up and let you play.”Mike is a junior majoring in journalism and communication arts. How do you think the Badgers will try to replace Watt? Let him know at [email protected] and follow him on Twitter @mikefiammetta.last_img read more

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Record in sight as Langley shoots flawless 10-under

first_img In his last event he was disappointed with his putting and has practised hard in the run-up to this championship. “I’ve worked really hard on my mid-range putting and it certainly paid off today. Most of my putts today were in the 10-20ft range, although I holed from about 35ft on the 17th. That was a bonus.” “I play on my days off now and I enjoy it so much more now, it’s like a privilege,” he said.  Berkshire golfer David Langley led an astonishing day of low scoring with a flawless 10-under par 61 in the first round of qualifying for the English amateur championship.  Altogether 103 players beat par today at The Berkshire – and if they keep up the standard tomorrow there will be a record low cut for a place in the match play stages, which start on Thursday.  Among the others who made their mark were 2016 Amateur Champion Scott Gregory and Lytham Trophy winner Jack Singh Brar who were both seven under, playing the Blue and the Red respectively. Late in the day they were joined by boy international Danny Daniels (Essendon, Hertfordshire) who had a bogey free round on the Red and remarked: “I played lovely.” 1 Aug 2017 Record in sight as Langley shoots flawless 10-under He’s already shown his form this season by reaching the third round of the Amateur Championship, but this round is his career best. “I’ve shot nine-under twice before and walking up the last I thought it would be cool to hole the putt and push that record,” he said. He duly sank the 10-footer for his birdie three.  Click here for full scores Wilcox (North Hants), is the British mid-amateur champion and prepared for this event with a four-day break at Centre Parcs with his 10-year-old daughter. “That was my warm-up, five hours in the swimming pool each day helped!” he said. It did him no harm, however, as he too shot a bogey free round with six birdies and an eagle. The 23-year old from Castle Royle is a past BB&O (Berks, Bucks & Oxon) county champion, who has just graduated from university in the USA, where he has won on the college circuit.  But all the talk today was of Langley’s 61 on the Blue course, which included eight birdies, an eagle and just 25 putts.  Defending champion Dan Brown (Masham), Hampshire’s Tom Robson (Rowlands Castle) and Surrey’s David Corben (Hindhead) are all six under and 12 players shot five-under, including Coby Cartwright (Cosby,Leicestershire) who was in the first group out at 7.30am.  Towards the end of the day, Northumberland’s Matty Lamb (Hexham) set the low score on the Red course with his eight-under 64.  Gregory, who recently tied fourth in a EuroPro event, where he also shot seven-under in the first round, commented: “I really enjoyed this, I just played really well and there are a lot of positives going into tomorrow.” Singh Brar, who predicted 10-under was on the cards, started with three consecutive birdies and was five-under at the turn. “I don’t think I’ve ever been five-under at the turn, I normally do it the other way round.” He had three more birdies and one bogey on the way home, concluding: “I’ll never be disappointed with seven-under – it could have been better but it’s a great start and you don’t have to win the stroke play. His round was also bogey-free and is a personal best. “I didn’t hole many putts but tee to green was probably the best I have ever hit it,” said the 19-year-old who has just completed his first year at university in the USA.  There’s an interesting mix of full-time golfers and full time workers among the leaders. The working brigade includes Coby Cartwright, 18, who says “I probably enjoy it more than I did as a junior; Matt Wilcox and Tom Robson, who is the assistant secretary at his club and was previously at college in the USA.  His playing partner, Matt Wilcox of Hampshire, went round in eight-under and joked afterwards: “I’m very disappointed with that now!”  The top 64 players and ties will qualify for the knockout and the previous record included two players on level par.  Caption: David Langley (image copyright Leaderboard Photography).  “I really enjoyed this, I just played really well and there are a lot of positives going into tomorrowlast_img read more

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