How Many Homeowners Are in ‘Strategic’ Forbearance Plans?

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How Many Homeowners Are in ‘Strategic’ Forbearance Plans?

first_img 2020-10-12 Christina Hughes Babb in Daily Dose, Featured, News Related Articles Share Save Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Forbearance data might not be as daunting as it looks at first blush. That is, according to an article by Bloomberg.com, which points to the Mortgage Bankers Association (MBA) data showing that, as of September 6, as many as 25% of all homeowners in forbearance plans have continued to make their monthly mortgage payments. That means that of 3.4 million households in forbearance at that point, about 820,000 had not missed a payment.Mike Fratantoni, MBA’s SVP and Chief Economist, in a Bloomberg interview, called this “one of the most surprising aspects of this entire episode.”He added that he had seen that share drop over the months as borrowers exited forbearance.What does this indicate? Bloomberg author Christopher Maloney (a market strategist and former portfolio manager) suggests it is “strategic forbearance, with many homeowners taking on the option, just in case.”He broke it down: “Of the Ginnie Mae borrowers in forbearance, 23.7% are current. For conventional borrowers it’s 20.6%, and for those sitting on banks’ balance sheets it’s 28.6%,” Maloney pointed out. “This is important, as mortgages which continue to pay are not going to be bought out by servicers, and for mortgage investors buyouts are just prepayments by another name. With loans bought out from pools at par, this can weigh on portfolio performance, especially when much of the mortgage universe is trading at a premium.”He explains how changes to forbearance data can come as a result of servicers moving loans among categories. For example:”While the percentage of the overall mortgage universe in forbearance has been declining of late, when it is due to servicers buying out those loans from the pools it can be a case of merely moving it from one category to another,” he wrote. “… the percentage of the Ginnie Mae universe in forbearance has dropped to its current 9.16% from a high of 11.83% on June 21. While on the face of it this is good news, the drop was boosted by bank servicers buying out loans. This moved them to the ‘other’ category—which has increased over that time frame—from the ‘Ginnie Mae’ category.”To Bloomberg, Fratantoni stressed that jobs are the most significant factor when it comes to getting through forbearance.“So long as the job market keeps improving and the housing market is in solid shape there is a good potential for this to keep improving,” Fratantoni said. Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago How Many Homeowners Are in ‘Strategic’ Forbearance Plans? Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago About Author: Christina Hughes Babb The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Previous: VP Candidate Viewpoints: Harris and Pence’s Housing Perspectives Next: FHA’s ‘Generational Shift’ in Tech Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago  Print This Post October 12, 2020 2,120 Views Sign up for DS News Daily Christina Hughes Babb is a reporter for DS News and MReport. A graduate of Southern Methodist University, she has been a reporter, editor, and publisher in the Dallas area for more than 15 years. During her 10 years at Advocate Media and Dallas Magazine, she published thousands of articles covering local politics, real estate, development, crime, the arts, entertainment, and human interest, among other topics. She has won two national Mayborn School of Journalism Ten Spurs awards for nonfiction, and has penned pieces for Texas Monthly, Salon.com, Dallas Observer, Edible, and the Dallas Morning News, among others. Home / Daily Dose / How Many Homeowners Are in ‘Strategic’ Forbearance Plans? Subscribelast_img read more

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Pocket change

first_imgWhen Apple CEO Tim Cook announced the rollout of the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus last month, the most intriguing news nugget he shared had nothing to do with larger display screens or improved cameras. Rather, it was the fact that users of iPads, Apple Watches, and the latest iPhones would be able to make purchases via the company’s new, proprietary mobile payment platform, Apple Pay.By aiming their iPhones at so-called NFC terminals, customers can access their credit or debit card information to buy goods and services without swiping or handing cards to store clerks. Retailers will record the sales by using random, tokenized numbers, rather than by including customers’ names, card numbers, and expiration dates. The system is designed to minimize the risks from widespread data breaches like those at retailers such as Target and Home Depot. Apple says the firm will not save financial or other identifying information on its servers, nor will it share customer transaction data. Major retail chains, including Whole Foods, Walgreens, and Staples, have signed on to accept Apple Pay, as have American Express, Visa, and MasterCard.The debut of Apple Pay this week came as the company announced a record-breaking $8.5 billion in net profit for the quarter ending Sept. 27, driven largely by sales of 39 million iPhone 6 and 6 Pluses, its most successful iPhone launch ever.Skeptics caution that Apple’s entry into mobile payments may not be the start of an iTunes-like rise to market domination. While the company’s deep pockets, strong global name recognition, and customer loyalty — particularly among young consumers — do give the company a leg up, Apple Pay does not work on older iPhone models or on Android phones, leaving plenty of room for Google Wallet, PayPal, SoftCard, and other competing services working to wean people from their cash- and card-carrying habits. Sunil Gupta, the Edward W. Carter Professor of Business Administration at Harvard Business School (HBS), studies the impact of digital technology on consumer behavior. He is also chairman of the general marketing department and co-chairs the executive education program on digital and social strategy at HBS. Gupta spoke with the Gazette about Apple Pay, and the future implications for the company and for the way we shop.GAZETTE: What distinguishes Apple Pay from others already in this market?GUPTA: First of all, there’s the image of Apple as a technology leader and the fact that they can build it into the iPhone and all the other components. The second difference is, because of the brand power of Apple as well as the overall company stature, they have been able to link it with major players like MasterCard, Visa, and American Express — and not only the payment networks, but also several merchants, whether it’s McDonald’s or Home Depot and so forth. So that’s one component. The second component to Apple Pay, one of the key benefits they’re arguing more than the convenience, is the security. The merchant won’t actually see the card, but will see a randomly generated token that is for one-time use only. So with the thumbprint [ID sensor] on the phone, I think the security will increase dramatically.And the third thing that is happening is the largest payment network companies, like MasterCard and others, are telling the merchants that the merchant terminals that they use at the retail counters should comply with a new chip that’s going to be put into these cards for security purposes, and if they don’t have the new equipment, then any fraud [that occurs], MasterCard, Visa and the banks will not be liable for. One of the biggest hassles that’s been happening for adoption is the merchants didn’t see any benefit, because they have to replace all these terminals for the NFC payments, at their own costs. But if in 2015 they need to change their terminals to comply with this chip technology anyway, there’s a good possibility they might say “Hey, might as well get the NFC-compatible terminal because the world is moving in that direction.” I think that confluence of factors might work in [Apple’s] favor.GAZETTE: What’s in it for consumers and for retailers to use Apple Pay? Is convenience and security enough of a hook?GUPTA: I think those things are still question marks. For the consumer, there’s not enough of a compelling reason. It’s just taking out a card versus taking out a phone. Some people will certainly be swayed by the security issue. But if you think about what Apple is going for initially, their hope is users of Apple Pay will be much more [open] for in-app purchases or purchases within the environment of the mobile phone itself rather than at the offline retail store. And once we get used to the idea, then you might find it easier to do in other places. There’s not a compelling reason for me to use Apple Pay, other than curiosity.The only reason some of the retailers have signed up is that the association with Apple makes them seem cool, and technology leaders in some way. If I’m McDonald’s versus Burger King, and McDonald’s signs up, you feel like you’re appealing to the cool generation. Apple has that halo, and you’re leveraging that halo. But there are a lot of large retailers like Walmart staying away because they are saying “We want to control the information.” If I’m Walmart, I want to own the data because I can learn about my consumers’ habits. If I’m Starbucks, I already have the mobile app in there, so I don’t see any reason why I should link with Apple Pay. There’s been a lot of uncertainty. It’s almost like if you go back to the iPhone or iPad days. The initial notion of the iPad that I heard many people say was that “It’s just a bigger version of the iPhone. Why do I need it?” — until the apps started developing and until consumer habits changed. So it’s a chicken-and-egg problem to a certain extent. Once people start accepting it, you build up to a critical mass. But there are no guarantees, of course.GAZETTE: What might be a compelling benefit?GUPTA: For example, when Starbucks built their mobile app so that people could load it with money, it took off and did quite well. The simple reason is if I’m a regular person who goes to Starbucks and there’s a long line, I can very quickly go through that, and they’ll know exactly what I want to order, everything is credited, and I don’t have to carry my stuff around. It’s not a large population, but some people found it compelling that all of the information is there, and then Starbucks will give some discounts also as a result. Typically, discounts are the easy way for companies to give some benefit, but not the only way. It has to be something stronger than that: “I find it convenient, I find it useful, I couldn’t have done it without this,” something of that kind.GAZETTE: The idea of the “virtual wallet” has been talked about as a holy grail of sorts for quite some time, and yet most people still use cash or plastic. What’s driving Apple to jump into this market now, and what’s your sense of its potential to fundamentally change retail buying habits?GUPTA: There need to be a lot of players in this system for it to happen: The consumers have to be willing, merchants have to be willing, card companies have to be willing, and lots of players have to align. And it’s very hard for any single company to align all these guys and say “Let’s do it.” Apple seems to have a little bit more clout than most companies because of the halo effect. That’s why MasterCard is actually advertising it on its own. They’re putting the marketing dollars behind Apple Pay, not Apple. Why is MasterCard doing it? Because they want to come across as a more innovative company.The whole battle between Apple and Samsung and Google is about keeping the customer within your own ecosystem. The reason why you and I might not change from iPhone to Samsung, even though we may think Samsung is a better phone in terms of features and benefits, is that I’m linked to iTunes, I’m linked to all that kind of stuff, so it just increases the stickiness of the consumer. If I now also have Apple Pay, then there’s one less reason to switch. For them, it’s a loyalty play. They’re not getting the data. They’re not making a whole lot of money. You can only compete with Samsung and the others on the hardware so much. So it’s just another way of differentiating yourself from the other guys.GAZETTE: So there’s not a significant amount of money to be made from being the platform that people use to buy things?GUPTA: Not in the near future. Yes, with a large volume, it might become reasonable, so that’s a possibility. But my sense is that the bigger play, for the time being, is on keeping the loyalty to their devices. Samsung is already becoming a big competitor, and Apple can certainly continue innovating. But at some point in time, the differences look smaller and smaller on the device side.GAZETTE: What are the big challenges in getting customers and vendors to move away from credit cards and migrate to a mobile payment platform like Apple Pay?GUPTA: I think it’s more psychological. We’re all creatures of habit, and we’re used to doing certain things. I’m used to pulling out a credit card and swiping it, and that’s what I do, even if you tell me it’s exactly the same. In order for me to switch, there has to be a really compelling reason. PayPal, for example, works simply because we’re not used to pulling out a credit card and swiping on our desktop. We had to input the numbers; that was a different behavior. That’s why anytime there’s a change in medium, there’s a possibility of somebody else changing your behavior. I think at the retail level, adoption will take more time than, say, within the mobile phone or in app purchases, which will be the first direction that will happen.Right now, the system looks secure, but tomorrow who knows whether somebody can hack into your system. There’s always a new set of worries. What if I lose my phone? There’s nothing foolproof. So [Apple Pay] looks secure compared to what we have so far, but it looks secure because nobody’s tried to hack it so far.GAZETTE: Is there a competing product or idea on the horizon that could undercut the mobile payment model, or is this the future?GUPTA: I think mobile payment will take some time. Is there a new technology that might replace mobile payment? It doesn’t look like that right now, because I think mobile payment itself is in the early stages. So I don’t think one needs to worry about replacing mobile payments. There are a lot of challenges to begin with: Eighty-five percent of the population around the world still uses cash and checks. [Many people] haven’t even moved to cards, if you look globally. So moving to mobile will also take a decade or so. It’s not going to happen soon.This transcript has been lightly edited for clarity and length.last_img read more

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Voice recognition to help property technophobes

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Four-goal 2nd quarter paves way in Syracuse’s win over Army

first_img Related Stories SELF DEFENSE: Syracuse shuts down Army, Thul in 1st win of seasonMaltz returns to mix for balanced offense against Army In a game where offense was hard to come by, Syracuse’s four-goal second quarter served as the exception, as the Orange pulled away from the Black Knights and clicked offensively en route to a 6-2 victory.“I think it was just some of the situations we had,” SU head coach John Desko said. “We get a goal off the offense and we get something unsettled. We caught them in a couple clearing situations that started a little break for us.”Syracuse’s first goal of the second quarter came on a strike from Scott Loy at the 11:42 mark. Kevin Rice looped around the net, looking for a cutting teammate. He found Loy, who corralled the ball and hurled it into the net in one fluid motion.The goal extended the Orange’s lead to 2-0, and started to distance SU from Army after a sluggish first quarter for both teams.Less than two minutes later, Luke Cometti scored his first goal of the game and third of the season off of a dish from JoJo Marasco. The midfielder curved the pass around a defender. Cometti caught the ball and rifled it past Army goaltender Sam Somers.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThen, Dylan Donahue and Derek Maltz joined the fray. Donahue, who’s been a bright spot for Syracuse so far this season, drew a double team and toyed with the Army defense. Maltz juked one way and burst toward the other, finding space to catch Donahue’s pass and essentially place the ball into a nearly wide-open net.“I think we came out of the gate and we were a little bit less nervous than last game,” Maltz said. “Second quarter, we had a week to prepare. We knew what they were doing.”Donahue added a goal of his own roughly three minutes later, sneaking into the crease and beating Somers.Syracuse turned a 1-0 advantage into a 5-2 lead, showcasing its offensive potential while putting on a strong defensive showing, as well. The Orange attempted 18 shots in the quarter, only seven away from Army’s total for the entire game.Said Maltz: “With JoJo, Luke and Scott Loy, they did a great job up top and our attack moved the ball well and found some opportunities.” Comments Published on February 25, 2013 at 12:31 am Contact Trevor: [email protected] | @TrevorHasscenter_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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CRUEL: FARMER TO FACE CHARGES OVER ‘HORRIFIC’ CONDITION OF DONKEY

first_imgThe Irish Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals is to ask the DPP to prosecute a Co Donegal farmer after a donkey was found in an ‘horrific’ state.The seven-year-old brown donkey mare had overgrown hooves, severe rain scald, lice and worms.Just days from death, Shae was very lame, thin and weak when she was rescued. It was recovered in Co Donegal at the weekend and the ISPCA said it is preparing a file for submission to the DPP.The charity has warned it is continuing to encounter widespread equine welfare issues despite the winter weather being mild.Four other donkeys were rescued in Co Sligo and Co Kildare.ISPCA inspector Brendan Hughes said the hooves of the Kildare donkeys had been cut back with a saw or angle grinder and they had not received proper farrier treatment. All the donkeys are currently recovering in the National Animal Centre. CRUEL: FARMER TO FACE CHARGES OVER ‘HORRIFIC’ CONDITION OF DONKEY was last modified: February 21st, 2012 by BrendaShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:CRUEL: FARMER TO FACE CHARGES OVER ‘HORRIFIC’ CONDITION OF DONKEYlast_img read more

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A’s pitcher gets first shot at redemption this spring training

first_imgMost teams would have been crawling all over each other to get their hands on Bridwell after his 2017 season. He went 10-3 with a 3.64 ERA over 20 starts that year and was emerging as a promising fixture in the … MESA, Ariz. — It’s tough when nobody wants you.Parker Bridwell was told he was no longer wanted four times this offseason. The Yankees didn’t want him. The Angels didn’t want him, twice. Even the A’s placed him on waivers shortly after claiming him. Proof baseball can be a cold game.last_img read more

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‘You can blame me’: Bob Myers, weeping, confirms Kevin Durant has Achilles injury

first_imgThe injury Kevin Durant suffered in Game 5 of the NBA Finals Monday night was not a re-aggravation of his prior calf injury.It was an injury to his right Achilles tendon, Warriors president of basketball Bob Myers said in a press conference after Golden State’s 106-105 win.“The initial injury was a calf injury. This is not a calf injury,” Myers said. “I’m not a doctor, I don’t know how those are related or not, … [vemba-video id=”van/sc/2019/06/11/bang_af21c065-e113-431a-91bc-5521796d160b”]last_img read more

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Little Tyrannosaur with “Proto-Feathers” Found

first_imgNational Geographic News wasted no time; a day before a report of another Chinese dinosaur with feathery-like structures was published in Nature,1 they already had color artwork on their news page, trumpeting the title, “T. Rex Cousin Had Feathers.”  Yet Nature itself seemed ho-hum about the announcement.  It was neither the cover story, nor mentioned in any news briefs in the journal.  Though Nature Science Update was proud of the find, it hastened to add that the proto-feathers, as some are calling them, “are not what we would recognise as feathers today, but are their evolutionary precursors.  Rather than having a central shaft and barbs, they are single flexible filaments that would have covered the dinosaur’s body like hair.”  Next day, Science2 was more interested in its advanced cranium than its fuzz, and mentioned nothing about it being an ancestor of feathers or flight.    A look at the illustrations in the scientific paper confirms the impression that calling these “proto-feathers” is a stretch.   Any suggestion that these “integumentary structures” even had branches at all is unclear; they look like narrow, overlapping stripes on the rock, and there is no way to tell how they were attached to the skin.  The filaments are only about 2 cm long and were found related to the tail and jaw bones.  The team that discovered Sinornithosaurus, another “feathered” dinosaur, admitted in 2001 that “Despite these similarities, homology between the integumental filaments of Sinornithosaurus and avian feathers has been questioned.”  The team that reported this new find, named Dilong paradoxus, only referred back to that paper with a cautious statement that such “filamentous integumentary structures in Jehol theropods have been interpreted as protofeathers.”    They suggest that these structures might have provided thermal insulation.  These beasts, about the size of large dogs, may have had trouble storing heat.  Big animals, like teenage T. rex monsters (see 08/11/2004 headline), have trouble getting rid of it – that’s why elephants lose their baby hair as they grow.  They did not give any indication the filaments were related to the origin of flight in any way.  Another problem is that Dilong is classified as “early” in the evolution of dinosaurs, and it already had some “derived” features (i.e., fully evolved, similar to those of later descendants), while other contemporaneous groups lacked them.  “The distribution of postcranial pneumatization” [hollowness in skeletal bones], for instance, “is thus very complex among coelurosaurians, rather than displaying a continuous evolutionary trend along the line to birds.”    The bottom line: strange filaments apparently associated with a small, new kind of tyrannosaurid dinosaur have been found well preserved in Liaoning province, China, but no one knows quite what to make of them.  They appear early on in the tyrannosaurid lineage, but are not yet known among Cretaceous monsters like T. rex.  The filaments do not establish any unambiguous phylogenetic link to modern bird feathers except for superficial similarities.  They look more like hair than feathers, and probably functioned as insulation.1Xu, Norell et al., “Basal tyrannosauroids from China and evidence for protofeathers in tyrannosauroids,” Nature 431, 680 – 684 (07 October 2004); doi:10.1038/nature02855.2Erik Stokstad, “T. rex Clan Evolved Head First,” Science, Vol 306, Issue 5694, 211, 8 October 2004, [DOI: 10.1126/science.306.5694.211a].This critter was no more evolving into a bird than a porcupine is, but news outlets like National Geographic are so eager to prove birds evolved from dinosaurs, you can practically sense them chomping at the bit to leap into the air themselves.  Mark Norell (on the discovery team) said that Jurassic Park IV will probably portray all the monsters with feathers instead of scales.  We’ve learned to be cautious about claims of feathered dinosaurs evolving into birds (see 05/06/2004, 05/19/2003 and 11/21/2002headlines, for instance).  It’s going to take a lot more than a few scratch-lines on rock to make this story stick.    Since dinosaurs are not all that similar to living reptiles and are all extinct, we should be open to any piece of evidence that helps us understand what they looked like: skin impressions, tracks, and now these filaments.  If the filaments helped keep the little doggy dinosaurs warm, like hair does, then they were not evolving into something else; they had a function.  Perhaps the young had some kind of downy covering to retain heat and lost it as adults.  Avian feathers, on the other hand, are much more complex than these filaments and are designed (for birds of the air) for flight.  Each creature was adapted to its environment; that shows design, not evolution.  Anyone thinking the dino-bird advocates have scored yardage with this find should read this description of the difference between scales and feathers by Dr. David Menton, and also read our previous reports on problems the Darwin Party wrestles with in their own just-so stories of the evolution of feathers (see 10/30/2003 and 08/21/2001 headlines).(Visited 39 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Odisha group starts drive to retrieve discarded flags

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Sharapova determined to prove point on Slam return

first_imgFILE – In this Aug. 27, 2014, file photo, Maria Sharapova, of Russia, returns a shot to Alexandra Dulgheru, of Romania, during the second round of the U.S. Open tennis tournament, in New York. Sharapova has been granted a wild-card invitation for the U.S. Open’s main draw. Sharapova is among eight women who were given entry into the 128-player field by the U.S. Tennis Association on Tuesday, Aug. 15, 2017, and by far the most noteworthy. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow, File)Former world number one Maria Sharapova makes her first Grand Slam appearance next week since serving a 15-month doping suspension, bringing renewed passion and resolve to the US Open.The 30-year-old Russian was given a wildcard into the tournament by the US Tennis Association (USTA), a move critics complained about earlier in the season but another key step in the road back for the five-time Grand Slam winner.ADVERTISEMENT “When it comes to tennis, good or bad — there’s really only one thing that I know for certain — I’ve missed it,” Sharapova wrote on the Players’ Tribune website.“Though these last two years have been tougher -— so much tougher -— than I ever could have anticipated… my passion for the game has never wavered. If anything, it has only grown stronger.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutSharapova was issued a two-year suspension after testing positive for the banned heart and blood boosting drug meldonium at the 2016 Australian Open, but the Court of Arbitration for Sport reduced the ban on appeal.She said that she had taken it for several years and did not know it had been placed on the banned list at the start of 2016. SEA Games: PH’s Alisson Perticheto tops ice skating short program Sharapova has missed three of the past four US Opens, her last visit ending in the 2014 fourth round.The USTA defended its wildcard offer, saying, “Her suspension under the terms of the tennis anti-doping program was completed and therefore was not one of the factors weighed in our wildcard selection process.”“Consistent with past practice, a wildcard was provided to a past US champion who needed the wildcard for entry into the main draw.”Former world number one Sharapova won the 2006 US Open as well as Wimbledon in 2004, the 2008 Australian Open and the 2012 and 2014 French Opens.“I’m sure this is a great moment for her to have an opportunity to be back to a place where she has done so well,” seven-time Grand Slam champion Venus Williams said.Sharapova plays catch-upSharapova was bolstered by fans with “Welcome back Maria” signs in Germany and cheering support last month in Stanford, her first US match in more than two years.“I feel like I just want to hug everyone and say thank you,” Sharapova said.Sharapova defeated American Jennifer Brady 6-1, 4-6, 6-0 in her Stanford opener but suffered a left forearm injury and has not played competitively since.“I feel like I’m playing catch-up against everyone who has had a head start,” she said of being hurt during US Open tuneup events. Read Next WATCH: Streetboys show off slick dance moves in Vhong Navarro’s wedding SEA Games: ‘Stand-in’ Ferrera nails hammer throw bronze LOOK: Venues for 2019 SEA Games UPLB exempted from SEA Games class suspension Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles02:02PNP to prove activists’ link to CPP NPA00:50Trending Articles01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games Sharapova made her return in April at Stuttgart, reaching the semi-finals as a wildcard, but such invitations sparked criticism from some WTA rivals, saying she should have to work her way back without such benefits, some suggesting a life ban.“I’m aware of what many of my peers have said about me and how critical of me some of them have been,” she wrote.“If you’re a human being with a normal, beating heart… I don’t think that sort of thing will ever fully be possible to ignore.”Sharapova was refused a wildcard by French Open organizers and missed Wimbledon with a thigh injury, so the US Open will be her first Grand Slam event since last year’s Australian Open.Shaking off criticism after the French Open snub, Sharapova tweeted, “If this is what it takes to rise up again, then I am in it all the way, everyday. No words, games or actions will ever stop me from reaching my own dreams. And I have many.”ADVERTISEMENT Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC MOST READ Catriona Gray spends Thanksgiving by preparing meals for people with illnesses Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. LIST: Class, gov’t work suspensions during 30th SEA Games LATEST STORIES SEA Games in Calabarzon safe, secure – Solcom chief View commentslast_img read more

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