Rapper Tekashi69 linked to shooting investigation hours after probation sentence, police say

Rapper Tekashi69 linked to shooting investigation hours after probation sentence, police say

first_imgWABC (NEW YORK) — Just hours after rapper Tekashi69, also known as 6ix9ine, was let free on a sentence of probation in criminal court, a brawl broke out at a celebration of the judgment that ended with one of the rapper’s crew shot.The 22-year-old rapper, whose real name is Daniel Hernandez, had visited the restaurant Philippe on Manhattan’s Upper East Side for a dinner with his manager, according to New York ABC station WABC. Members of Hernandez’s entourage got into an argument with the restaurant’s staff and were denied entry, according to police.“These males came back a short time later and struck one of the private security guards over the head with a chair. That security guard produced a licensed handgun, fired two times, striking one of the individuals in the torso,” NYPD Deputy Inspector Kathleen Walsh, commander of the 19th Precinct, said at an evening press conference.Hernandez left the scene at the time of the initial argument and was not present at the time of the shooting, WABC reported.The man shot by the security guard was taken to a local hospital with non-life-threatening injuries.Video shot by WABC outside the restaurant showed the security guard being treated for a cut to his head.Manhattan’s Madison Avenue was shut down for a period of time in the area as police investigated the fracas and shooting.Hernandez was sentenced to four years probation earlier in the day on charges stemming from a previous guilty plea for using a child in a sexual performance. He was arrested in 2015, when he was 18, after he posted video on social media showing him with a nude 13-year-old girl at a party, according to The New York Times.The rapper posted a photo of him with his daughter on Instagram, where he is followed by over 14.5 million people, Friday night. He wrote in all capital letters: “GOD THANK YOU FOR ALLOWING ME TO BE FREE TO CELEBRATE MY DAUGHTERS 3rd BIRTHDAY.”He had posted a photo of himself in a suit just after the probation ruling was handed down and wrote, “GOD IS GOOD GOD IS… GOOD!” The post was liked 2.28 million times in less than 12 hours.Hernandez is also facing an assault charge in Houston after being arrested in July for allegedly choking a fan at a mall.The rapper’s debut album, “Day69,” released in February, peaked at No. 4 on the U.S. Billboard 200 chart. His singles “Gummo” and “Fefe,” which features Nicki Minaj, are both certified platinum for 1,000,000 sales by the Recording Industry Association of America.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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‘They killed him for no reason,’ says aunt of 21-year-old armed man shot dead at Alabama mall

first_imgiStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — The aunt of a 21-year-old man shot dead at an Alabama mall said her nephew was killed by police “for no reason at all.”Emantic Fitzgerald Bradford, who was armed, was shot Thanksgiving night when another man — first believed to be Bradford — and an 18-year-old got into a physical altercation at the Riverchase Galleria mall in Hoover, a suburb of Birmingham, according to Capt. Gregg Rector of the Hoover Police Department.Police initially said they believed Bradford pulled out a gun and shot the 18-year-old teenager twice in the torso before fleeing.Bradford, who was fleeing “while brandishing a handgun,” was spotted by two uniformed police officers, one of whom drew a weapon and fired on him, authorities said. Bradford was pronounced dead at the scene.On Friday, Rector said in a statement, “New evidence now suggests that while Mr. Bradford may have been involved in some aspect of the altercation, he likely did not fire the rounds that injured the 18-year-old victim.”“They killed him for no reason at all. He wasn’t the shooter,” Bradford’s aunt, Catherine Jewell, told reporters on Saturday.Jewell said her nephew was in the Army and was home for Thanksgiving.“He was a great guy, he was very respectable,” she said. “They did him wrong.”In a statement released on Saturday evening, Bradford’s family said they were working to determined what exactly happened in the moments leading up to the fatal shooting.“Our family is completely shocked, heartbroken and devastated at the tragic death of our beloved “EJ,” the statement reads.“As we continue to grieve, rest assured, that we are working diligently with our legal team to determine exactly what happened and why this police officer killed our son. We will never forget EJ.”Demonstrators in support of Bradford gathered at the mall Saturday, holding signs like, “stop police killings.”Rector had said on Friday: “Investigators now believe that more than two individuals were involved in the initial altercation. This information indicates that there is at least one gunman still at large who could be responsible for the shooting of the 18-year-old male and 12-year-old female.”Rector on Saturday didn’t immediately respond to a request for additional comment from ABC News.The 18-year-old was last reported to be in serious condition and the 12-year-old, an innocent bystander, was last reported in stable condition.The Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office has turned over the investigation to the Alabama Law Enforcement Agency due to a potential conflict of interest.“We have determined that one of the witnesses is closely related to a Sheriff’s Office sworn Personnel,” said Randy Christian, chief deputy of the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office. “In order to remove any perceived biases, at the request of the District Attorney, we have turned the investigation over to ALEA.”The officer involved in the shooting has been placed on administrative leave, pending the outcome of the investigation.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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CONNECTIONS bt Jim Redwine

first_imgFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare Gavel Gamut By Jim Redwinewww.jamesmredwine.comCONNECTIONSFather George Rapp of Pennsylvania and Robert Owen of New Lanark, Scotland each hoped their visions for Mankind would manifest in New Harmony, Indiana. Rapp’s vision involving Christ’s Second Coming and Owen’s involving a world without any traditional religions look different but have similar dreams at their base. A world without private property ownership was one of the major goals for both.I will leave an analysis of Rapp’s grand plans to the theologians. As to Owen’s, I defer to the philosophers but will refer to Robert Owen, A View of Society and Other Writings edited by Gregory Glaeys who is a Professor of History at Royal University of London and a recognized authority on Robert Owen.According to Glaeys, Robert Owen (1771-1858) was one of the greatest British social reformers and was a pioneer in schemes for humane factory management, the eight-hour workday and the education of the poor. Owen even now remains respected as a pioneer socialist, feminist and advocate of an ecological approach to industry and urban life.One of the most interesting ironies of the connections between the philosophies of Rapp and Owen and New Lanark and New Harmony is that the clergy was one of Owen’s fiercest opponents. Yet elements of Rapp’s Christian thought and Owen’s abhorrence of Christianity and all other organized religions intertwine, especially their mutual calls for a new world order and disdain for economic competition and individualism. Perhaps that was why and how Owen and Rapp knew of one another and what led to Owen in New Lanark, Scotland buying Rapp’s town of New Harmony, Indiana.Glaeys describes that transaction as follows:“In 1825 he (Owen) purchased a ready-made community set on 20,000 acres in southern Indiana from a pietistic German sect, the Rappites. At New Harmony he spent about 40,000 pounds (about $240,000) or four fifths of his New Lanark fortune in a fruitless effort to organize a disparate group of about 800 radicals, freethinkers, backwoodsmen and scientists.”p. xviUnfortunately, too many of the 800 thought Owen’s utopian concept simply meant they could do nothing and Owen would support them. These ingrates had ample reason for this attitude based on Owen’s own creed as set forth in his Manifesto:“Individual and national competition and contest are the best modes (under the then existing circumstances) by which wealth can be created and distributed.….But it is obtained by creating and calling into full action, the most inferior feelings, the meanest faculties, the worst passions, and the most injurious vices which can be cultivated in human nature.”p. 358Owen sought a system of production and distribution that called for “…[T]he least labour to all members of a society, and especially with the least amount of unhealthy and disagreeable employment.”Well, Gentle Reader, you can probably see how such an experiment might turn out. You are right. In about two years Owen’s heaven on earth was more akin to Purgatory. And Owen’s insistence on a strict compliance to his principles on his terms did not engender enthusiastic compliance. Or as the ancient Greeks might have observed, hubris is a mortal flaw.There is so much more to Robert Owen and the symbiotic relationship between New Lanark, Scotland and New Harmony, Indiana than can be crammed within a few newspaper columns. However if you care to hang around awhile I plan to cram some stuff into my next few epistles.But before the following weeks’ offerings, I must address last week’s column thanks to our friend and Robert Owen authority, Linda Warrum from New Harmony. Linda read last week’s column and offered some advice. First, Linda, thanks for reading Gavel Gamut; you have doubled my audience. Secondly, thanks for pointing out not all of Robert Owen’s children were given the middle name of Dale and Father Rapp’s group were not German Lutherans but Pietists who, “…[E]mphasized personal piety over religious formality and the orthodoxy of the Lutheran Church.” It was nice of Linda to both read Gavel Gamut and respond.For more Gavel Gamut articles go to:www.jamesmredwine.comlast_img read more

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Scottish firm rebrands as Poundbakehouse

first_imgKelso-based J L Bakery is fighting against the effects of the recession with a rebrand of its retail estate. So far, three of its eight shops Galashiels, Jedburgh and Innerleithen have been rebranded as Poundbakehouse as the firm looks to counteract the 35% drop in sales it has suffered over the past three years.MD Max Robbie told British Baker he was now planning on rolling out the rebrand to all his shops, with Kelso the next to be revamped, later this month. “We need to regain some of our customers. Since the credit crunch, on the retail side, we have lost about 35% of sales,” he explained. “We tried to work through it, but ultimately reached the stage where we felt that rebranding was required.”To help fund the concept, and as part of a financial restructure of the company, the bakery also invited two new investors “to come in and have a share of the company”, he added. This also saw the business name change from Jackie Lunn to J L Bakery.All products in the shop will sell in multiples of £1. There will be five products for sale at £2, but £1 will be the main price point, said Robbie. “We’ve always looked at the product and product quality as being the main driver of our business, but this time we are also focusing on the product being at an affordable price. However we’ve changed nothing in terms of the ingredients used,” he added.”We’re looking to increase our volumes by 50%, which will obviously hit our margins to begin with, but overall monetary contributions are forecast to increase. It’s simply about getting more people through the door.” He said the response from customers so far had been that it was an excellent concept.The firm also has a wholesale arm, which makes up around 25% of its business.last_img read more

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Philly Funk Band Swift Technique Makes Appearance In Orange Is The New Black Finale

first_imgFans everywhere have been excited to binge watch the new season of Orange Is The New Black, which was released by Netflix on Friday, June 17th. We were delighted to learn that one of our favorite Philly bands, Swift Technique, was featured in the final episode of this season. The group answered a casting call with a YouTube video and got the gig, only to rock out for the cast on set.Bassist Jake Leschinsky shares some thoughts of his experience with us.“We had an absolute blast working with the cast & crew of Orange Is The New Black. It was an honor to be called upon by this particular show that is currently on the cutting edge of modern television. The opportunity was twofold – we spent an intensive day in the studio cutting a track for the show & we spent one day filming on set. The project materialized very quickly and we even had to cancel a high profile show. When all was said and done, I was so proud to see our guys rise to the occasion and absolutely knock this out of the park.”Congrats to Swift Technique!For fans of their funk, don’t miss the band performing a tribute to Prince at Brooklyn’s The Hall At MP, supporting an all-star “James Brown Vs. Prince” super jam session with members of Lettuce, Trey Anastasio Band, Rubblebucket, Turkuaz and more. The show is this Wednesday, June 22nd, and more information can be found here. The band will then head to the Ardmore Music Hall on June 24th for a performance alongside Con Brio, so don’t miss out! More info can be found here.last_img read more

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Watch John Medeski, Eddie Roberts, Zigaboo & George Porter Jr. Jam Out As Foundation Of Funk

first_imgAsk any architect or construction crew and they’ll tell you nothing they design or build will last without a solid base. When it comes to matters of funk you can’t find a more solid foundation than bassist George Porter Jr. and drummer Zigaboo Modeliste, the rhythm section of The Meters. The dynamic duo have been playing with an ever changing cast of all-stars as Foundation Of Funk over the last few years, and teamed with John Medeski from Medeski, Martin and Wood and Eddie Roberts from The New Mastersounds at the recent Bear Creek Bayou.Porter and Modeliste helped write the definitive story of the funky back beat with a style often imitated but never duplicated. With big splashy cymbal crashes and syrupy sweet the partnership has endured for five decades for a reason… nobody does it better. Joined by the wizard of the keys John Medeski who delighted listeners and his fellow players with his straight from the soul runs on his organ. Filling the final slot guitarist Eddie Roberts showcased the slinky lead lines that have earned him accolades on multiple continents, effortlessly slipping from support to the front line.Celebrating a rebirth in New Orleans, the Bear Creek Bayou brought together an amazing array of talent for a two day funk-a-thon with dozens of the acts that had the crowd in a state of perpetual motion. Our own Rex Thomson has just received permission to share a slew of videos from the two sets by this amazing line up that includes Meters classics, a guest appearance by noted sax player Khris Royal and even a nod to Professor Longhair. Whether in the office, on your phone or safe at home turn the music up and get down to the sounds of the Foundation Of Funk!“Rolling Stone”“Whatcha Say”“Cissy Strut”“Hey Now Baby”“People Say”last_img read more

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New Festival, The Big Weekend, Announces Umphrey’s McGee, Lettuce, & More For Inaugural Lineup

first_imgToday, new festival The Big Weekend has announced the lineup for their 2018 event, set to take place in Chicago, Illinois, from October 4th to October 6th. The new event, presented by Silver Wrapper, Live Nation, and JAM Productions, will feature three nights of music across five Chicago venues.Following the model of a city takeover, the inaugural festival will feature performances from Umphrey’s McGee, Lettuce, Emancipator Ensemble, Leftover Salmon, Papadosio, The Motet, Spafford, The Revolution, The Russ Liquid Test, SunSquabi, and more. Early and late performances allow for multiple-venue visits, and evening and afternoon surprises with artists are also in the works. Watch The Big Weekend announcement video below:[Video: The Big Weekend]Tickets are on sale this Friday, June 8th, at 10 am (CT). CID Entertainment is offering a Big Weekend VIP Experience that bundles a ticket to a Friday and Saturday night’s concerts with premium access at each show. For fans seeking a weekend getaway, travel packages including hotel reservations at Cambria Chicago. Big Weekend Experience & Travel Package details are available here.Chicago has a long history with the jam scene, from hosting the final Grateful Dead show in ’95 to the monumental Fare Thee Well performances in 2015, on the Grateful Dead’s 50th anniversary. It’s only fitting that hometown favorites Umphrey’s McGee are anchoring the first of what will be an annual event.As Michael Berg of Silver Wrapper Presents notes,When the idea of bringing The Big Weekend concept to Chicago came to us, we loved it. Previously, we had used a similar concert series model on events such as the Chicago Bluegrass and Blues series, so we knew it could work. The music of the extended jam scene is at the heart of the Silver Wrapper concert community, so we’re especially excited to see this one come to life and start a new fall music tradition in Chicago.For more information, head to The Big Weekend’s website.last_img read more

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President Faust in Africa

first_imgGABORONE, Botswana — Harvard President Drew Faust saw firsthand how Harvard is helping the African nation of Botswana to fight AIDS, when she toured facilities on Wednesday (Nov. 25) in two communities where a Harvard-Botswana partnership is operating anti-AIDS programs.Faust met with young Harvard-trained researchers in a state-of-the-art laboratory built and operated by the Botswana-Harvard Partnership for HIV Research and Education (BHP), a novel collaboration between the Harvard School of Public Health’s AIDS Initiative (HAI) and the government of Botswana.Botswana’s anti-AIDS programs are considered models of how to fight the disease, although the nation remains among those hit hardest by AIDS.Botswana is an early stop on Faust’s trip to southern Africa. She also will visit Johannesburg and Cape Town in South Africa. She is scheduled to give a speech at the University of Johannesburg on Thursday (Nov. 26).Faust arrived in Botswana’s capital, Gaborone, early in the morning and drove to the village of Mochudi, where she met with Max Essex, Mary Woodard Lasker Professor of Health Sciences and chair of the Harvard School of Public Health AIDS Initiative. Essex showed Faust several projects under way at Mochudi Hospital. Among them is a successful effort to determine the best drug regimen to prevent transmission of HIV from breastfeeding mothers to their nursing children.Faust also visited the BHP laboratory in Gaborone, talking with young researchers who trained at Harvard. She met later with Botswana’s minister of health to discuss Harvard’s continuing commitment to Botswana, and with the University of Botswana’s vice chancellor to review the current undergraduate exchange program and to explore new collaborations. The day ended with a reception attended by two former presidents of Botswana and other government officials from the United States and Africa.last_img read more

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Reading and study strategies course open for registration

first_imgRegistration is open for the Bureau of Study Counsel’s 14-day reading course. The fee is $150.Through readings, films, and classroom exercises, students learn to read more purposefully, selectively, and with greater speed and comprehension. The hourlong classes will be held Monday-Friday, June 28-July 16, at 5 Linden St.Register in person at the bureau, or call 617.495.2581.last_img

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The ‘diversity problem’ in science

first_imgOpportunities for women and people of color to pursue careers in science have improved in recent years, but still lag behind those of white men, Harvard College Dean Evelynn M. Hammonds told a crowd at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Jan. 27. Much work remains to be done, she said, to ensure that students from all backgrounds have an equal opportunity to enter and succeed in fields like engineering and technology.The remarks were part of the keynote address delivered by Hammonds at MIT’s Institute Diversity Summit. The annual conference provides an opportunity for students, faculty, and staff to learn about and discuss ways to promote excellence and diversity at the school.Hammonds, the Barbara Gutmann Rosenkrantz Professor of the History of Science and of African and African American studies, said that women and people of color had demonstrated time and again their interest in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM), as well as their ability to succeed in these fields. Scientists agree that race and gender should not determine whether a student pursues a career in STEM. So why, she asked rhetorically, do women, Latinos, African-Americans, and Native Americans continue to be underrepresented in these areas of study?To shed light on the question, Hammonds called on the work of the African-American intellectual, scholar, and activist W.E.B. Du Bois. Du Bois, she said, was the first to name and identify the ‘diversity problem’ in science in his 1939 essay “The Negro Scientist.” The piece was a response to the statements by a prominent white American scientist who had publicly noted how few African-Americans had made their mark in science.“The scientist had stated that Negroes — the preferred term of the period — had made their mark in music, literature and on the stage but not in the exact sciences,” she said. “Du Bois’ response called the man’s attention to the fact that it was not easy for an American Negro to pursue science.  Though the man publicly agreed with Du Bois’ point, privately he expressed to him ‘… that the exact and intensive habit of mind, the rigorous mathematical logic demanded of those who would be scientists [was] not natural to the Negro race.’”To disprove this opinion, Du Bois discussed the careers of the 12 African-American male scholars listed in American Men of Science. Although the men had been educated at some of the most prestigious schools in the country — including Harvard, Yale, Brown, Bowdoin, the University of Chicago, and Williams — their careers had been curtailed because of “color prejudice,” or racism.“In each instance, Du Bois described men who were well-educated, serious scholars and researchers,” Hammonds said. “They published in the leading journals in their fields and strived to attain positions in major institutions. Yet, in each case they were denied permanent positions for which they were qualified.  In many instances, their work was well regarded, and on that basis alone these men were sometimes offered prominent positions in the academy — only to be denied employment when ‘it was learned by correspondence or interview that they were colored.’”Du Bois also gave examples of discriminatory treatment toward graduate students, Hammonds said, including that of an African-American student who was denied a fellowship because his teacher believed that he would not be able to find work after studying science. Others were denied doctorates only on the basis of their color even after passing their general examinations. Young African-American scientists could sometimes find work in the historically black colleges and universities (HBCU), but these institutions typically had no laboratories, no museums, and no scientific collections.“Here in 1939, on the eve of World War II, Du Bois offered a powerful analysis of the ‘diversity problem’ in science,” Hammonds said. “He located that problem in the social context of the United States where legalized segregation constrained the opportunities of African-Americans who had the desire, the ability, and the education to do science.  More importantly, he asserted that the prejudice of white scientists was connected to the pervasive view that ‘the exact and intensive habit of mind, the rigorous mathematical logic demanded of those who would be scientists is not natural to the Negro race.’”African-American women faced even greater barriers to participation in science than their male counterparts, Hammonds said. Before World War II, there were only eight African-American women with Ph.D.s in science in the United States, compared with nearly 20,000 white men. All secured positions at historically black colleges, but, in addition to the lack of resources that plagued their male counterparts, the women encountered negative attitudes about gender roles that limited their advancement even within those institutions. Hammonds, who received a master’s degree in physics from MIT, commended the institution as one of the few in the country with a history of educating African-American women scientists. Even so, she said, the opportunities were few and far between.“The first African-American female graduated from MIT in 1902,” she said. “The second was in the 1950s; during the late 1960s MIT admitted only one or two African-American women a year. Significant numbers of women from this group were not admitted until the 1970s. The first African-American woman was appointed to the faculty in the 1970s; the first one tenured through the ranks in 1998; and the first African-American female faculty in the school of engineering was tenured just this year. As you can see, the barriers within science have persisted for minority women even as they changed for white women and minority men.”Hammonds made a plea for continued study of the issue of diversity in science and engineering. It is critical to better understand how scientific communities work and how talent is recognized, valued, and assessed, she said. To illustrate why, Hammonds closed her talk with a final quote from Du Bois.“One may say in answer to all this: so what?  After all, there are plenty of white men who can be trained as scientists.  Why crowd the field with Negroes who certainly can find other socially necessary work?  But the point is that ability and genius are strangely catholic in their tastes, regard no color line or racial inheritance.  They occur here, there, everywhere, without rule or reason.  The nation suffers that disregards them.  There is ability in the Negro race — a great deal of unusual and extraordinary ability, undiscovered, unused and unappreciated.  And in no line of work is ability so much needed today as in science.”last_img read more

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