DNA leads to man’s arrest for 1993 murder in Minneapolis: Police

DNA leads to man’s arrest for 1993 murder in Minneapolis: Police

first_imgCIPhotos/iStock(MINNEAPOLIS) — A man linked to a cold case through DNA and genetic genealogy is now in custody, 26 years after allegedly killing a Minneapolis woman, according to local police.Jeanne Ann Childs, 35, was found dead in the bedroom of her Minneapolis apartment on June 13, 1993, according to police. Authorities declined to say how she was killed.Nearly 26 years went by without an arrest — until a man was arrested Monday in Waite Park, Minnesota, Minneapolis police said.Police believe the suspect, who has not been named, was not known to Childs.Through DNA left behind at the crime scene, genetic genealogy was used to investigate and eventually identify the suspect, the Minneapolis Police Department said in a Tuesday statement.Spokesmen for the Minneapolis police and the FBI declined to specify where DNA was left at the crime scene, how the suspect’s family tree was investigated and how his DNA was obtained.The novel investigative technique of genetic genealogy takes an unknown killer’s DNA from a crime scene and identifies the suspect through his or her family members, who voluntarily submit their DNA to genealogy databases.The first major public arrest through genetic genealogy was the April 2018 arrest of the suspected “Golden State Killer.” Since then, genetic genealogy has helped identify more than 20 other suspects.“We all hope Jeanne’s family can finally find peace as a result of this tenacious effort by officers and agents,” Jill Sanborn, Special Agent in Charge of FBI Minneapolis, said in a statement Tuesday. “This case underscores law enforcement’s ability use every tool at its disposal to crack a case.”The suspect is being held in Hennepin County Jail on probable cause of murder, pending the filing of formal charges by the Hennepin County Attorney’s Office, according to police.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Law firm enters HR software market

first_imgLaw firm enters HR software marketOn 2 May 2000 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Law firm Eversheds has moved into the HR software market with the firstrental product as part of its drive to provide a one-stop shop for theprofession.A new company, Eversheds Software, is offering a suite of simple softwareapplications which can be used in isolation or alongside others already in use.Managing director Charles May says that for the first time HR departmentshave a choice between investing in big budget systems or renting the Evershedspackage, which does not tie them in for years. The cost, for eight users, for example, would be 69p per employee per month.The software includes modules for personnel, an SMP calculator, time &attendance, payroll and shopfloor data collection, plus 11 other products. “We have listened to what HR professionals have been telling us andthis initiative has been driven by demand,” said May. “Our concept is different in that you only pay for what you reallyrequire. It is flexible for any size and shape of organisation and the rentalarrangement gives you flexibility. We are taking away the risk because you arenot locked in.”The software is available to everyone and not just Eversheds clients. Thismove by Eversheds is seen as part of an increasing trend towardsdiversification by suppliers to the HR profession. The law firm is intent onbuilding stronger relationships in the personnel market and sees software asanother means to this end. Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Strontium labelling of the shell of the Antarctic limpet Nacella concinna (Strebel, 1908)

first_imgNacella concinna (Strebel, 1908) held in seawater enriched with Sr, partially replaced Ca in their shells with Sr The bands laid down were clearly visible In back-scattered, scanning electron microscope images, and such bands could be used to mark carbonate skeletons in field investigations of growth Sr directly replaced Ca in the carbonate shells, although not entirely, and newly secreted shell material always contained less Sr than would be expected from the levels used in treatments. Specimens held in water with atomic Ca:Sr ratios of 114:1 (control seawater, no added Sr), 4.4:1, 2.2:1 and 1.1.1 produced shell ratios of ca. 635:1, 11.0.1, 3.1:1, and 8.1:1 respectively These values were between 1.4 and 7 4 tunes higher than expected, indicating that, when shell was laid down Sr was discriminated against by a factor of around 4. Growth rates were similar before and after placing specimens in experimental treatments and feeding rates were not significantly different between treatments and controls, indicating that the enhanced Sr regimes caused little stress for the limpets. Limpets were exposed to the experimental treatments for 12 days. However, in specimens where growth bands were visible, it was only possible to distinguish between 5 and 8 micro-growth lines. In specimens removed after 3 days exposure, there was no detectable area of enhanced Sr in the shell. These two observations were interpreted as either meaning that it takes around 5 days for Sr to enter the extra-pallial fluids which are used for laying down shell, or that the limpets did not produce any shell growth during that period. Experiments placing Sr in food and not in the treatment water, and vice-versa, suggested that Sr taken directly from the water may be more important than uptake from food.last_img read more

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Instructional Assistant Professor – Genetics – (FAC001652)

first_imgThe Department of Biology and Biochemistry at the University ofHouston invites applications for an Instructional AssistantProfessor to begin September 2021. The successful candidate will beresponsible for teaching 3 courses/ semester in a highlycollaborative setting. These courses may include, but are notrestricted to, a Genetics Laboratory course, the 2-courseIntroduction to Biology sequence for majors, and General Biologyfor non-majors.This is a 12-month, non-tenure track appointment with possibilityfor renewal. Applicants must have a Ph.D. in a relevant discipline.Successful candidates will demonstrate broad training, skills incontemporary pedagogy, formal training in online instruction, astrong interest in teaching undergraduates from diversebackgrounds, and a willingness to contribute to the development ofstudent success initiatives and undergraduate programs in thebiological sciences. Classroom teaching experience in bothface-to-face and online formats is required, and experience withcourse development is highly desirable.To apply, candidates should prepare a brief cover letter, names andcontact information of three references, curriculum vitae, and abrief (1-2 page) statement of teaching interests and philosophy.Review of applications will begin immediately and will continueuntil the position is filled. The Department of Biology andBiochemistry is a vibrant unit of 40 tenured/tenure-track and 9instructional faculty serving roughly 2,500 majors and an equalnumber of non-majors. The University of Houston is aCarnegie-designated Tier One research institution, as well as anHispanic-Serving Institution (HSI).With one of the most diverse student bodies in the nation, theUniversity of Houston seeks to recruit and retain a diversecommunity of scholars. In the cover letter, applicants should statehow their experiences and/or planned future activities willcontribute to the advancement of diversity and inclusion in thecontext of teaching, research, or community engagement.Alternatively, this information can be provided in a separatestatement. Review of applications will begin by December 20, 2020and continue until the position is filled.The University of Houston is an equal opportunity/affirmativeaction employer. Minorities, women, veterans, and persons withdisabilities are encouraged to apply.Qualifications :Applicants must have a PhD in a relevant disciplineNotes to Applicant: Official transcripts are required for afaculty appointment and will be requested upon selection of finalcandidate. All positions at the University of Houston are securitysensitive and will require a criminal history check.last_img read more

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Updike’s roots and evolution

first_imgJohn Updike (1932-2009) wrote more than 50 books, winning the Pulitzer Prize twice and the National Book Award four times. Which is to say: He knew what he was doing, and he did it with remarkable energy.But how did Updike, the boy from rural Pennsylvania, become Updike the international literary icon? Part of the answer, no doubt, is captive inside the John Updike Archive at Harvard’s Houghton Library, in the drafts, drawings, letters, reviews, photos, books, and miscellania acquired from his estate in 2009. (The writer himself, in prior decades, dropped off much of the archive himself, box by neatly organized box.)In particular, “the Harvard material helps you understand where he came from, how he developed in the ways that he did,” said Leslie Morris, Houghton’s curator of modern books and manuscripts, who assembled the display.The 1,635 books in the Updike archive are already available to scholars. Manuscripts will be ready as early as August, and correspondence will be open to researchers by the end of the year. The novel on which he was working at the time of his death, which involved St. Paul and early Christianity, will not be available until 2029.“What he finished was not very long,” said Morris, who knew Updike and who helped to retrieve material from his home office in 2009. “It was pretty rough.”For those who can’t wait, a short-lived exhibit at the Houghton’s Amy Lowell Room, open to the public through June 30, offers a glimpse of the Updike treasures. (“John Updike: A Glimpse from the Archive” was assembled from the archive itself, which is funded by the Amy Lowell Trust, the Charles Warren American History Fund, and private donations.)Says curator Leslie Morris, “You pick up the paperback, and you don’t have any sense really of what went into it. Here, you see him working on his language.”Three glass cases are clever summaries of where Updike came from intellectually (Harvard, where he was part of the Class of 1954); how he worked (meticulously and thoroughly, as seen from drafts of his work and examples of his research); and how eccentric literary archives can be. The third case, for instance, includes his favorite kind of ballpoint pen, which he got as free samples from his Boston ophthalmologist. “He was very frugal,” observed Morris.You can’t see the last novel Updike was writing, but you can see a 2009 view of the little desk on which he was writing it. There is a small lineup of hardbacks, including a tome on first-century Romano-Jewish historian Titus Flavius Josephus. But there is also, inexplicably, a rectangle of corrugated board and a bottle of Elmer’s Glue. (Scholars, start your musing.)The same case includes two blunted red pencils (Updike was a fervent self-editor) and a Paper Mate Sharpwriter #2. “If you had the pen that Keats wrote with or that Dickinson wrote with,” said Morris, “you’d be interested.”In the second glass case, there are draft pages of “Rabbit At Rest” (1990), the final novel of four in a series begun in 1960. Study the opening paragraph, and you can see Updike transform a mundane first try into prose that is crystalline and resonant. The drafts, handwritten and typed, “show how he really did work at things,” said Morris. “You pick up the paperback, and you don’t have any sense really of what went into it. Here, you see him working on his language.”You can also see how far a great novelist will go to get the details right. In the same case is a lengthy report on a Manhattan Toyota dealership (Rabbit got rich by selling cars), a hospital brochure (Rabbit got ill), and an empty, 99-cent bag of Keystone Corn Chips (Ask the scholars). “How many novelists really do research?” asked Morris. “Not that many.”There are also artifacts from Updike’s maturing — and eventually star-studded — literary life: letters from John Cheever, Philip Roth, Kurt Vonnegut, and William Keepers Maxwell Jr., the longtime fiction editor at The New Yorker magazine, where Updike got his start at being famous.The Maxwell letter is undated, but must have been fairly early, when Updike still needed money. “Dear John,” it starts. “Mr. Shawn [The New Yorker editor William Shawn] thought of a way to give you some more money — by deciding that this piece was funnier than originally paid for.”There is also a pen-and ink letter to Updike from his “Bech” book illustrator, Arnold Roth, who depicts his friend, wild-haired and flurry-fingered, at the typewriter. Roth has himself saying, in the background, what we would all say: “Geez, I wish that I’d said that!”But it is the first glass case that provides glimpses of Updike becoming Updike, beginning with a sample of his frequent letters home. (His mother collected many of his undergraduate letters, which were signed “Johnny,” in three bound volumes.) “It is rather unfortunate,” Updike wrote his parents in February of his freshman year, “that one who came to Harvard to avoid hazing should have been accepted into the sole campus organization [the Harvard Lampoon] preserving this pagan tradition.” He wondered how this could befall “one who has just discovered Joyce, Swift, and Pope.”And Shakespeare, of course. The same glass case includes Updike’s copy of “Romeo and Juliet” from his 1951 course with Harvard teaching legend Harry Levin. Updike’s marginalia, in fountain-pen ink, are dense and intense, revealing him to be, early on, the fierce reader who made the fervent writer. “He was a very committed reader,” an exhibit viewer observed. Morris replied, “This is Harvard.”Visiting the exhibit on June 13 will be enthusiasts attending the Second Biennial John Updike Society Conference in Boston. It’s hard to say what Updike would think of that, said Morris. “He didn’t like the whole idea of author societies. That’s why there wasn’t an Updike Society until he died.”But what would he think of the Houghton exhibit? “He’d be secretly pleased,” she said. For one thing, there was a display of Updike archival materials at Houghton when Updike was still alive, in 1987, “The Art of Adding and the Art of Taking Away.”And besides, said Morris, “Harvard meant a lot to him.”last_img read more

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Jenkins responds to fire at Notre Dame Cathedral

first_imgFollowing the recent fire at the Notre-Dame de Paris Cathedral, the University will be making a $100,000 donation toward upcoming renovation efforts, University President Fr. John Jenkins said Tuesday in a statement issued by the Office of Media Relations.“We are deeply saddened to see the damage to the Cathedral of Notre Dame in Paris, a church whose exquisite Gothic architecture has for centuries raised hearts and minds to God,” Jenkins said in the statement. “We join in prayer with the faithful of the Cathedral and all of France as they begin the work of rebuilding.”Furthermore, the bells of the Basilica of the Sacred Heart will toll 50 times at 6 p.m. today in commemoration of the beginning of the church’s rebuilding process.The cathedral, which was built between 1163 and 1345, caught fire Monday night, according to a CBS News report. The spire collapsed due to the blaze, and one firefighter was injured during efforts to put out the fire. Officials said it was extinguished Tuesday morning and the fire’s cause remains under investigation — though authorities do not believe it was caused by arson or terrorism.Tags: Basilica of the Sacred Heart, Fr. John Jenkins, Notre Dame Cathedral fire, University President Fr. John Jenkinslast_img read more

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This Week’s Picks! Pitch Perfect 2, Elaine Paige & More

first_imgSay Bonjour to the New JavertBegins May 12 at the Imperial TheatreIs there nothing better than an old favorite returning to their signature show? Well, maybe fresh-baked bread or a wicker basket full of puppies. Since neither is available, let’s go with the first option. We got a good one. The Broadway revival of Les Miz welcomes back Earl Carpenter—who replaces a Williamstown-bound Will Swenson—as Javert. Carpenter has played that role on and off since 1996. You’re in good, menacing hands. Click for tickets! Say Goodbye (Kinda) to Elaine PaigeIn movie theaters May 12The summer movie season is here, so the theaters will be inundated with superheroes, explosions, and some combination of the two for the next three months. Thankfully, there are options for the Broadway-inclined. For example: I’m Still Here, a big-screen version of Elaine Paige’s farewell concert playing today only. Don’t worry, gang: The First Lady of British Musical Theater is retiring from touring, not the stage. You don’t have to wear black. Click for tickets! Come to the Cabaret for a CauseMay 17 at BirdlandThis is your semiannual reminder that no one raises money for a good cause like Broadway stars. Hunky dudes taking it off! Stars dispensing sugary treats! Really, no one else come close. This time around, Lena Hall, Judy Kaye, Cady Huffman and other Broadway stars join cabaret performer Jamie deRoy for an evening of entertainment to support The Actors Fund’s new program, The Jamie deRoy & Friends Cabaret Initiative, which assists people working in the cabaret industry. Click for tickets! View Comments Hey you, recovering from the three-mimosa, fixed menu bacchanalia that is Mother’s Day. Who knew Mom could party like an energy drink-scarfing club kid? Well, you can’t rest quite yet. Why? There’s too much stuff to do! We’ve got Earl Carpenter’s return to Les Miz, Elaine Paige on the big screen, and the premiere of Pitch Perfect 2. Get ready for this week’s picks! Wake Up with Anna & the KingMay 12, check local listingsUsually, we’d be psyched to see Kelli O’Hara on Live with Kelly and Michael, because the lady knows how to deliver a juicy backstage anecdote. (The dressing room couch ain’t just for sleeping, guys!) But today, the star of The King and I brings along the cast, which means a musical performance from the Tony-nominated revival! Yay! Or maybe everyone will make a gigantic Denver omelet. Morning TV is weird that way. Make Your Friday Pitch-yIn movie theatres May 15Three years after charming us—and branding “The Sign” on our brains—the Bellas return for Pitch Perfect 2. Good news abounds. The awesome scene-stealers from the hip musical comedy—headlined by Anna Kendrick and Rebel Wilson—return. Ditto writer Kay Cannon. And Elizabeth Banks, who is incapable of being unfunny, acts and directs. The bad news: we have to wait until Friday. Stupid rotation of the earth.last_img read more

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Malaysia issues tender for 500MW of large-scale solar

first_imgMalaysia issues tender for 500MW of large-scale solar FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享PV Tech:The Energy Commission of Malaysia has released a tender for 500MWac of grid-connected large-scale solar projects to be developed on Peninsular Malaysia. This is the third round of 500MW tenders issued under the country’s LSS programme in support of utility-scale PV.The LSS 3 plants, ranging in size from 1-100MWac will sell power to major utility Tenaga Nasional Berhad (TNB) through power purchase agreements (PPAs), with commissioning expected in 2021.The RfP documents have been made available until 27 February and the deadline for submissions is 19 August 2019. As per Malaysian government policy, foreign entities involved in a consortium cannot have a stake that is larger than 49%.The EC awarded around 563MWac of PV capacity in its second Large-Scale Solar (LSS 2) tender round. The tender was originally only for 460MWac, but it was heavily oversubscribed. The earlier LSS 1 had also allocated more capacity awarded than was originally tendered.Last month, Scatec Solar completed the 65MW Gurun PV project in Malaysia, its first of three 65MW projects. Last December, TNB also completed a 50MWac solar power project in Selangor, Peninsular Malaysia. Even Malaysian state-owned oil and gas giant Petronas has become the latest fossil fuel major to show intentions to move into the renewable energy space, with a focus on solar power, through early stage announcements towards the end of last year.More: Malaysia issues its third 500MW solar tenderlast_img read more

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Sweetwater Swag Pack Giveaway

first_imgKavu ApronStraw Sun HatOowee Leather Pint KoozieLeather coaster 4 packGuide Beer Koozie x2Guide Beer T-ShirtSweetwater 420 Highway Sign Sticker Sweetwater Brewing Swag Pack Giveaway - $150 Value Sign up to win this sweet pack of Sweetwater Swag ($150 Value)! Sign up below to win! First Name: Last Name: Email*: Phone Number: Address*: City*: State*: ALAKAZARCACOCTDCDEFLGAHIIDILINIAKSKYLAMEMDMAMIMNMSMOMTNENVNHNJNMNYNCNDOHOKORPARISCSDTNTXUTVTVAWAWVWIWYZip Code*: I certify that I am over the age of 18.* denotes required fieldlast_img

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The Trouble with Thinking Regionally Comes When It’s Time to Act

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York “Think regionally.”An easy concept to grasp, but for Long Island, exceedingly difficult words to act upon.After decades’ worth of patchwork development strategies, the pendulum seems to be swinging back toward regional thought.First there was Suffolk County’s approval in July of their new Comprehensive Plan, an action followed last week by the County legislature approving the creation of a Regional Planning Alliance Program.These are substantive developments, but the question remains: When regional planning is conducted on Long Island, is it genuine?Not exactly. The Regional Planning Alliance Program is an achievement, but at the same time it is potentially a tool that can be used to undermine data-driven planning efforts.Over the last year, the philosophical shift to regionalism has been brought about by Suffolk County Executive Steve Bellone, who has championed massive-scale projects and bus-rapid transit, a proposal that Long Islanders aren’t exactly clamoring for. His intent is to bring about regional cohesion, going so far to forge regional alliances between Islip and Brookhaven.It is one thing to create an alliance between two townships that share a border, but another to bring together municipalities across the span of Long Island. Sometimes it seems as if Bellone is planning not to accommodate the future needs of the county, but rather to please New Age urbanists and developers.For example, his idea for the Route 110 Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) system looks good in a trendy presentation but it may have little practical value, considering it doesn’t do much to actually sync up where Long Islanders work and travel. Is there demand to go between Stony Brook University and Patchogue by bus? How many people are clamoring to go between the SUNY campus and Patchogue Village? And what about those who live north and south of the Route 110 Corridor? Do residents of Amityville and Huntington actually work in Melville, the proposed service area of Bellone’s BRT?Despite the legitimate questions this approach raises—seven out of 10 town supervisors in Suffolk reportedly opposed the measure out of concern that the county was infringing on their zoning authority—the bill still passed. The County Legislature is following the same regional theme of quasi-cohesion. The Regional Planning Alliance Program seeks to, as Long Island Business News’ David Winzelberg wrote, “incentivize multi-governmental collaboration on developments that affect a wider area than the town or village in which it’s located.” The reason for the strong opposition? The bill requires the towns’ participation in the program in order for projects to be eligible for “designated county resources.”The Towns, including Islip and Brookhaven which are working together on the Ronkonkoma Hub project, say that the County is infringing upon their local right to control zoning. Brookhaven Town Supervisor Ed Romaine, a level-headed veteran policymaker, said he “opposes this legislation as an infringement on its zoning and land use powers and the county’s intention to withhold viable funding…unless the town permits the county oversight…is wholly inappropriate.”Their pushback isn’t exactly surprising. Towns on Long Island do not take too kindly to other levels of government coming in and telling them what they have to do. This program is no exception.The county claims the measure is merely offering “assistance” to save the towns both time and money for large projects, while providing a newly established list of consultants who would be pre-approved by the County Department of Public Works.The pressing concern isn’t so much about the sovereignty of Suffolk’s 10 townships as it is about the role for the residents. Is this newly crafted program a mechanism that is designed just to expedite the development process? There is a huge need for inter-municipal cooperation, but should the goal be making the development process easier for builders or smarter for the community?If you ask the Long Island Builders Institute, or the developers themselves, they’d say that the red tape is too costly, Long Island is a horrible place to build, and not worth their time and money. Ask Bellone, with his grand visions of projects tied together by mass transit, and he would agree. After all, there is a brain drain to plug.Environmentalists would give a resounding no. Developers already get density increases in zoning decisions, they’re allowed to play fast and loose with zoning variances in their development proposals, and they are so politically connected that they can push their projects along and ride roughshod over significant environmental concerns.Here’s the truth. Both sides are right—and wrong.For Long Island to improve its long-term prospects, the townships must not fear this new regional alliance but embrace the notion of increased communication between towns and county government about important projects. The public should accept the reality that our region has problems that require regional solutions and not fight every idea tooth and nail. They have to see beyond their backyard fence.But policymakers cannot allow this new alliance to merely exist as a tool for developers. There is a reason why mega-projects like Jerry Wolkoff’s Heartland Town Square have resided in planning purgatory for so long. Many of them just aren’t that good, despite the hype, and they don’t address our region’s true needs.While well-intentioned, the new regional alliance proposal lacked specific details to assuage all concerns. As an editorial by the Riverhead Times-Review put it, one legislator went so far as to say during the vote that “something stinks.” Something just doesn’t seem quite right, especially considering that many of the town supervisors, and the public for that matter, did not find out about the measure until the last minute. For an alliance that seeks to aid the planning process, which is fueled by data and driven by the public and stakeholders, this marked lack of transparency isn’t a good start.More troubling is the bill’s supporters’ insistence that projects need speedier approvals. As reported by the Long Island Press, “Proponents urged the Legislature to pass the bill as soon as possible to accelerate a billion dollars’ worth of projects already approved but awaiting funds to start work.” All too often, when the word “accelerate” is associated with development, the end result is higher density urban sprawl that the region is unprepared for—and can’t sustain environmentally.Politics and special interests cannot continue to mire the process.If anything, this regional alliance is the opportunity to take a step back, and honestly look at Long Island, assess our regional needs objectively, and implement workable solutions on the local level. Regional planning isn’t about heavy-handed mandates from the mountaintop, but rather, thoughtful, detached analysis that has a beneficial community impact.Our problems do not stop at the town line or the county border. It’s time we stopped acting like they did. But while we’re talking about the big picture, let’s not give the Island away to the development lobby while we look the other way.Rich Murdocco writes about Long Island’s land use and real estate development issues. He received his Master’s in Public Policy at Stony Brook University, where he studied regional planning under Dr. Lee Koppelman, Long Island’s veteran master planner. Murdocco is a regular contributor to the Long Island Press. More of his views can be found on www.TheFoggiestIdea.org or follow him on Twitter @TheFoggiestIdea.last_img read more

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