Affordable housing, saved

Affordable housing, saved

first_imgRepresentatives from the state, Harvard University, and the city of Cambridge joined with elected officials, affordable-housing advocates, and local residents on Feb. 8 to celebrate preserving the affordability of 25 homes in Chapman Arms Apartments in Harvard Square.The success resulted from a partnership between the city and Harvard, since the University holds the ground lease for the building, and the agreement was the first implementation of the state’s new preservation statute, Chapter 40 T.“The accomplishment of preserving affordable units in the heart of Harvard Square is such a tribute to the commitment of the Cambridge City Council,” said Bob Healy, city manager, who is also the managing trustee of the Cambridge Affordable Housing Trust and has worked to strengthen affordable housing during his 30 years with the city. “It’s also important to remember all that Harvard has done in partnership with the city of Cambridge in the area of affordable housing.”“This is what it means to preserve homes, and it’s not just preserving where people sleep at night, but how they live their lives,” said Marjorie Decker, the Cambridge city counselor who received word last spring that the apartments were in jeopardy. The officials had gathered for the celebration in a crowded room at the Harvard Kennedy School.Last April, residents of Chapman Arms, which is also known as Craigie Arms, grew concerned when their apartment building of 25 affordable units was put up for sale. With affordability restrictions on the units scheduled to expire in 2016, the units were an attractive investment for buyers interested in converting them to market-rate housing.Cambridge officials, residents, Harvard, affordable-housing advocates, developers, funders, and the state all participated in solving the problem.Working together, the city, Harvard, and the nonprofit Homeowner’s Rehab Inc. (HRI) were able to orchestrate HRI’s purchase of the building to ensure affordability of the 25 units for a minimum of 50 years. Harvard amended and extended its ground lease on the property in a manner that allowed HRI to secure the necessary financing from the Cambridge Affordable Housing Trust and the Community Economic Development Assistance Corporation (CEDAC). HRI purchased the building in a preservation transaction that was finalized on Dec. 19.Attending the ceremony were Cambridge City Manager Robert W. Healy (from left), Harvard Vice President for Campus Services Lisa Hogarty, Cambridge City Councilor Marjorie Decker, Undersecretary of the DHCD Aaron Gornstein, Executive Director of HRI Peter Daly, and Executive Director of CEDAC Roger Herzog.Chapman Arms was the first preservation acquisition to utilize Chapter 40T, the state’s new innovative expiring-use law that was pushed through by housing advocates and elected officials, including Rep. Kevin Honan of Allston-Brighton and longtime Rep. Alice Wolf of Cambridge, who spearheaded passing the legislation.Healy noted Harvard’s long history of supporting affordable housing in Cambridge, from the sale in the 1990s of 100 units to the city for the below-market rate of $32,000 each, to the creation of the 20/20/2000 program, a $20 million, 20-year, low-interest, revolving loan program that has helped to create 465 affordable units in Cambridge. He also acknowledged Harvard’s involvement in the effort, as holder of the ground lease on the property, which allowed the deal to come together.“It’s always nice to thank your host, but they deserve it,” said Healy. “They really have been a key player in the support of affordable housing in Cambridge for a very long time.”Lisa Hogarty, Harvard’s vice president for campus services, lauded the town-gown partnership, saying, “The city of Cambridge and Harvard have enjoyed a long and successful track record of working together to address the quality of life in the city. By any measure, Chapman Arms is an affordable-housing success story.”For Chapman Arms resident Linda Jordon, the success story is personal, since “This means 25 people will have a home.”last_img read more

Continue Reading

EXPLAINER: How Trump’s second impeachment trial will work

first_imgWASHINGTON (AP) — Soon the Senate will have to decide whether to convict former President Donald Trump for incitement of insurrection. Trump’s impeachment trial begins in earnest Tuesday, the first for a president no longer in office. Senators will sit at their desks and listen to hours of testimony about the violent mob of Trump supporters who laid siege to the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. The House impeached Trump on Jan. 13, one week after the violence. Republicans and Trump’s lawyers argue that the trial is unnecessary, and even unconstitutional, because Trump is no longer president and cannot be removed from office.last_img read more

Continue Reading

Happy Light benefits college during winter

first_imgSaint Mary’s is offering a solution to its students’ weather-induced woes. The Happy Light, available in Women’s Health by appointment only, imitates sunlight with special fluorescent bulbs that are twenty-five times brighter than normal bulbs. Students are welcomed and encouraged to take advantage of the pseudo-sunlight, director of Women’s Health Elizabeth Fourman said. “The counselors had been reading about the benefits of the Happy Light for years, so we finally purchased our Happy Light in the fall of 2010,” she said. “It’s used to treat SAD (Seasonal Affective Disorder), which is prevalent in the northern U.S.” Up to 25 percent of people in the northern U.S. have some symptoms of SAD, Fourman said, and the disorder is more prevalent in females, which made Saint Mary’s an ideal location for the light. With lows in the 10s and highs in the 40s this winter season, Fourman said South Bend’s weather may be detrimental to academic success. For those afflicted with the disorder, the environmental inconsistencies are hazardous to both physical and emotional health. Consistent exposure to sunlight or artificial light may mitigate the effects of the disorder. Fourman said those who have used the light usually notice a small improvement in mood and energy. “There is a direct correlation to improved symptoms with regular use,” she said. “The symptoms of SAD also improve with regular exercise, good nutrition, hydration, counseling, regular sleep cycle and for some, medication.” Saint Mary’s is not the only school to try this unconventional method, Fourman said. “I don’t know of any locally, but some schools with multiple lights rent them for a week at a time, or have students check them out from the library, and some have students schedule appointments like we do here,” she said. Ideally, the light should be used daily, Fourman said, but with students’ busy schedules, that often is not an option. Typical sessions run from 15 to 60 minutes, but most people use it for about half an hour. “Students start making appointments for the Happy Light in November. The most we’ve had in one week is 11, but usually it’s less than that,” said Fourman. Sophomore Logan Nevonen visited the light for the first time last year. “I hadn’t heard of it before and I thought I would try it because I was not feeling like myself. I was pretty down,” said Nevonen. The Texas native went to the Happy Light twice a week for about three weeks and did homework. “Girls from warmer climates request the Happy Light more frequently,” Fourman said. “Our dreary weather can last for months, and a lot of us forget what the sun looks like until it comes back in the spring. Many students who come from a more sunny climate have a difficult time adjusting to our clouds.” Unfortunately, the light’s effects do not work for everyone. “I didn’t feel any different than I had before I tried it, so I decided not to go back. It didn’t work for me,” said Nevonen.last_img read more

Continue Reading

Students look to implement Wi-Fi filter to limit pornography use

first_imgChris Collins | The Observer Members of Students for Child-Oriented Policy advocate for filters that would make accessing pornography more difficult.Senior and SCOP member Carolyn Ebner said they hope to foster productive dialogue about the issue.“I think it’s not something people are willing to talk about, which is the trouble, so I think our primary goal for this week is to draw attention to that and try to remove the silence and shame around it,” Ebner said.The University forbids the use of its Wi-Fi network to view porn, but the policy is difficult to enforce while respecting the privacy of students. The filter, while it would not be the end-all solution to the issue of pornography on campus, would send an important message and force students to consider their actions more fully, Ebner said.“Putting a filter in, first of all, is technologically extremely difficult to do, to actually filter out all the websites that would provide pornography for people,” Ebner said. “So, from our point of view, it’s more like a symbolic statement from the University. … It’s not going to stop the people who are really watching and using it, but for people trying to stop, it’s one more check on them to be like, ‘Okay, is this something I actually want to do?’” Senior and SCOP member Maria Kunath said while efforts to prevent others from viewing pornography may make it more difficult to access, the users must ultimately make the decision themselves.“We are not going to stop pornography use,” Kunath said. “If this petition passes, that’s not going to say that everyone who has ever looked at pornography is never going to do it again in their lives, but we’re hoping that people stop and think.”Kunath said SCOP comes at the issue of pornography from a variety of angles, including Catholic teaching. The Church condemns porn as objectification of human beings made in God’s image and a violation of human dignity, she said.“We’re hoping that a block, if it goes through, gives people pause and they say, ‘Okay, why is that?’” she said. “Why does the Church teach that about human sexuality? Is it good, is it bad, is this something I do, how does this affect my life? We’re hoping that the filter is a moment for a lot of people to pause and think and say, ‘What’s porn? Why am I using it? Why does Notre Dame think it’s bad?’” The ultimate solution, Ebner said, has to come from students’ challenging and supporting their peers — something she has already seen among her own friends.“The biggest thing with WRAP Week is that we’re not expecting this to fix the problem, but we just want to get people talking about it,” Ebner said. “And I don’t think the University taking giant actions is going to be the most effective thing. I think the most effective thing is for groups of friends to start talking about it and holding each other accountable and give each other permission to be real and vulnerable with each other. I think the realest help is going to come from friendships.” Tags: filter, pornography, Students for Child Oriented Policy, White Ribbon Against Pornography, Wi-Fi, WRAP To conclude White Ribbon Against Pornography (WRAP) — a weeklong effort to bring attention to the consequences widespread pornography use can have on relationships and human sexuality — Students for Child-Oriented Policy (SCOP) invited students to offer their support for a filter that would block porn websites on Notre Dame Wi-Fi. Members set up tables outside North and South Dining Halls around lunchtime, seeking to engage their peers in conversation.last_img read more

Continue Reading

Cabaret Undressed! The True Stories Behind the Broadway Hit

first_imgBroadway Tug-of-WarAfter his musical The Boy Friend became a big hit in the West End and on Broadway in the mid-’50s, composer/lyricist Sandy Wilson adapted I Am A Camera into a musical, only to find that the rights had been scooped up by producer Harold Prince. Prince commissioned Joe Masteroff to write the musical’s book, but the pair agreed that Wilson’s take on the material didn’t feel authentic to 1920s Berlin. Instead, they enlisted John Kander and Fred Ebb to write the score, and Wilson got the boot. If You’ve Got It, Flaunt It21 years after he first put on his Emcee’s dingy suspenders and nipple glitter, Cumming is returning to Broadway in the role that made him a star. “It starts rehearsals the day after my 49th birthday,” Cumming teased in The Aesthete. “So I’ll be entering my 50th year dancing my tits off and being a sexpot.” Thank God, he says, for muscle memory! Sam Mendes Made it Seedier…In 1993, Donmar Warehouse artistic director Sam Mendes revived the stage musical at the non-for-profit theater in London’s Covent Garden, starring then-unknown Scottish actor Alan Cumming as the Emcee and Jane Horrocks as Sally. The director made it just as game-changing as the original—he stripped down the material, sat the audience at tables and let them order drinks, and was one of the first directors to cast actor-musicians to be both the ensemble and the band. Best of all, the production got the stamp of approval from John Kander. “[Alan Cumming] is disgusting,” the composer told Mendes with delight. “He’s right in your face.” Related Shows Cabaret Redefining BroadwayWhen Cabaret opened in 1966, it turned the idea of a Broadway musical on its head. There was no overture—instead, audiences were caught off-guard by a drumroll and loud cymbal crash. A giant mirror reflected the audience back on itself. The story dealt with everything from anti-Semitism to abortion, which was unusual for the day. “This marionette’s-eye view of a time and place in our lives that was brassy, wanton, carefree and doomed to crumble is brilliantly conceived,” wrote New York Times critic Walter Kerr. The Evolution of the EmceeWhen it came to creating the world of Cabaret, director Hal Prince recalled his own time in Germany as a young man in the army—specifically a Stuttgart nightclub called Maxim’s. “There was a dwarf MC, hair parted in the middle and lacquered down with brilliantine, his mouth made into a bright red cupid’s bow, who wore heavy false eyelashes,” Prince explained in The Making of Cabaret. Joel Grey, who created the role of the Emcee on Broadway, came up with the white-faced, pink-cheeked look that defined the role for decades. “I found this greasepaint called ‘Juvenile Pink,’ and I thought to myself, ‘This creep, he would want to look young, and this is what he would use,'” Grey recalled. Welcome to BerlinThe Weimar Republic, which flourished between Germany’s defeat at the end of World War I and Hitler’s rise to power in 1933, was a vibrant cultural period famous for its music, film, art and philosophy, as well as its tolerance of decadent behavior (including prostitution and homosexuality). 1920s Berlin was the center of Weimar culture, but when the Nazi Party began rising to power, this liberal mecca started crumbling as artists and intellectuals fled to safer shores. …And Wilder…When Roundabout Theatre Company wanted to bring the production to Broadway, Mendes insisted they find an honest-to-God nightclub. After two years, they found Henry Miller’s Theatre (now the Stephen Sondheim), which had previously been a nightclub called Xenon, and before that, an X-rated movie house. Renamed the Kit Kat Klub, the rundown theater’s gritty atmosphere was just the place for the in-your-face revival. View Comments Star Files The Toast of MayfairWhen Cabaret announced its return to Broadway, the question on everyone’s mind was, who will play Sally? Anne Hathaway and Emma Stone were rumored to be interested in the part, but in the end it went to stage newbie Michelle Williams. Williams admitted that being the new girl makes her “feel like a baby” in rehearsal, but she has a champion in Liza Minnelli. “I’m excited to see what they will do with the show and am sure it will be great,” said Minnelli, calling the new star a “wonderful actress.” Come to the Cabaret, Michelle! In here, life is beautiful…See Alan Cumming and Michelle Williams in Cabaret at Studio 54. Show Closed This production ended its run on March 29, 2015 At First, Liza Didn’t Get the PartThe 1972 film version of Cabaret was just as successful as its stage debut, due in part to its magnetic leading lady, Liza Minnelli. But the young actress had initially tried out for the Broadway musical, and didn’t get the part of Sally. “I knew I’d get the movie for some reason,” Minnelli told The Huffington Post. “I remember saying to myself, ‘That’s all right, I’ll do the film.” Minnelli not only got her wish, but she won an Oscar for her performance, alongside original Broadway star Joel Grey as the Emcee and director Bob Fosse. And as an added bonus, the film basically revived the whole concept of the movie musical, which had been languishing for years. Thanks, guys! Capturing a CultureWriter Christopher Isherwood compiled his experiences living in Weimar Berlin into a semi-autobiographical collection of stories, Goodbye to Berlin, in 1939. The character of Sally Bowles was based on German nightclub singer Jean Ross—her name was borrowed from composer Paul Bowles. British playwright John Van Druten adapted Isherwood’s work into the 1951 Broadway play I Am a Camera, which was panned by the critics (Walter Kerr of The New York Times famously said, “Me no Leica”), but won actress Julie Harris the first of five Tony Awards for playing Sally. Alan Cumming Willkommen back to Broadway, Cabaret! The classic Kander and Ebb musical has arrived for a return engagement on the Great White Way, with Alan Cumming reprising his Tony-winning performance as the Emcee alongside Oscar nominee Michelle Williams, who is making her Broadway debut as British cabaret singer Sally Bowles. In the iconic tale set in 1930s Berlin, the Emcee holds court over the seedy Kit Kat Klub, where Sally strikes up a relationship with an American writer, Cliff. Cabaret opens at Studio 54 on April 24, but a classic isn’t born overnight! Read on for a look at what has long made Cabaret such a crowd-pleasing, game-changing favorite. …And It Paid OffCabaret opened on Broadway in 1998 (with some major changes from new co-director and choreographer Rob Marshall) and scooped up Tony Awards for Best Revival, for Cumming, for Natasha Richardson as Sally, and for Ron Rifkin as Herr Schultz. But when a construction crane fell on the Kit Kat Klub, the show had to temporarly close—that is, until Mendes kicked in the doors on the then-derelict Studio 54. “In addition to its rich and varied history, [Studio 54] happens to be the most atmospheric, theatrically viable space that I’ve seen in New York,” he told the Associated Press. Michelle Williamslast_img read more

Continue Reading

Letter Carrier Killed in Lloyd Harbor Crash

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A U.S. Postal Service letter carrier died after his mail truck was rear-ended in Lloyd Harbor on Monday afternoon, Suffolk County police said.Alan Nobile of West Islip was driving along his route southbound on West Neck Road when his vehicle was hit from behind by an Audi near the corner of Barberry Lane at 3 p.m.Nobile was ejected from the vehicle and taken to Huntington Hospital, where he died five hours later. Suffolk County medical examiners will perform an autopsy to determine his cause of death.The second driver, a Lloyd Harbor resident, refused medical treatment at the scene.Second Squad detectives are continuing the investigation.last_img read more

Continue Reading

Do you have a member focused ROA?

first_img 5SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Mike Higgins Mike Higgins is a partner at Mike Higgins & Associates, Inc. who has authored Filene research papers on measuring and managing credit union performance. His firm consults with credit unions … Web: www.mhaplanningforsuccess.com Details Whenever I attend a conference and talk with a credit union executive or board member, the first three things they use to describe their credit union are asset size, return on assets and net worth. It always strikes me as odd the fixation with rate of return. Return on assets is profit extracted from members in the current year. Net worth is cumulative profit extracted from members in prior years. I thought the objective was to create value for members instead of boasting about how much profit you have extracted from them!Credit unions serve a dual mandate. They need to generate enough return on assets to stay adequately capitalized, but at the same time, must create value for members, which comes at the expense of return on assets. Given this reality, where should the credit union set the bar in terms of expectations?Fortunately, the answer to the dual mandate riddle is easily answered and can be illustrated using the simple graphic above.Let’s start on the far right side of the graphic. A credit union that is performing in this area has a return on assets that is too high; it is extracting too much profit from its members and hoarding it as net worth. It needs to figure out ways to return more value back to members in the form of favorable pricing, supplemental dividends, etc.A credit union that is performing on the far left side of the graphic is generating a return on assets that is too low; it cannot sustain itself for an extended period of time operating here. It must figure out ways to increase productivity, improve product mix, reduce member favorable pricing and/or reduce provision for loan loss expense.As I am sure you have surmised by now, credit unions that perform in the middle of the graphic have found the optimal return on assets – one that generates enough profit to keep the “financial house” in order, but at the same time, avoids extracting excessive levels of profit from members.The math behind the graphic is remarkably simple. Multiply the credit union target net worth ratio by its appetite for asset growth and you have identified the optimal return on assets. For example, a credit union that desires to maintain net worth at 10% and has an annual appetite for asset growth of 5% needs a return on assets of 0.50% to maintain net worth. Add a safety margin of 0.20% and you have identified the optimal return on assets – somewhere between 0.50% and 0.70%. Anything below that amount and net worth will decline; anything greater than that and excessive levels of profit are being extracted from members and hoarded away as capital.At the end of the day, the optimal, member focused ROA provides a way for both the management team and board of directors to agree upon an acceptable rate of return.last_img read more

Continue Reading

Are your members financially healthy?

first_imgWhat if credit unions embraced this model as the base model on which to operate? What if we built products, programs, and policies that encouraged financial health? This spring at two conferences, I was able to share this model and practical ways to implement it across the credit union (lending, collections, member services, HR, operations, and marketing). The implementation ideas were well-received because they were practical and the model is a simple way to inform strategy.When you think about your members or your staff, how many are financially healthy? If they are like the people in the research provided by the Financial Health Network, that states, 17% of Americans are financially vulnerable and 55% are financially coping – they need their credit union to help them improve their financial health.Next Steps: Ask yourself if your financial education program has a strategyGet to understand the Financial Health model – https://finhealthnetwork.org/u-s-financial-health-pulse/. Get involved with the Financial Health Network. There are some credit unions already involved. Brainstorm ways to help your members increase their financial health by looking at the indicators and seeing how the credit union can help. Contact me if I can help you brainstorm or share resources that BALANCE has in place to improve the financial health of your members. HEALTH …it is a word we think about every day. We think about our own health and the health of loved ones. How is health measured? We look at key indicators like blood pressure, blood sugar, BMI, Cholesterol, and heart rate, for example. Our desire is for increased health. So, when I first heard of the Financial Health model created by the non-profit, Financial Health Network (formerly CFSI), I was thrilled. This framework offers four main pillars of financial health and under each pillar, there are two indicators. It is beautifully simple. They offer this model up as an open source. Why did I get so excited about this model? The Financial Health model is easier for the consumers to understand because of the specific indicators. These indicators show whether or not they have daily financial systems in place that allow them to be resilient and pursue opportunities over time. It provides a roadmap for them to track progress. Using a financial health model to model seems less insulting than pushing financial “literacy” and less nebulous than trying to include the entire field of financial education. Financial health is a framework.Financial institutions can take this framework and use it as a strategy. Many financial institutions offer financial education from a tactical level but I am not sure that there is a financial health strategy in place all the time. This model provides that. 101SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Cynthia Campbell Cynthia is a Credit Union Development Educator (CUDE), she holds a BS in Business Administration and an MBA from Elmhurst College in Illinois, and a master’s degree in Adult … Web: www.balancepro.org Detailslast_img read more

Continue Reading

Report: H5N1 mutated rapidly in Indonesian cluster

first_imgJul 12, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – Genetic studies show that the H5N1 avian influenza virus mutated multiple times as it spread through an Indonesia family in May, but the significance of the changes is uncertain, according to a news report today in Nature.The journal, basing its report on confidential genetic sequence data, published a chart showing that a total of 32 mutations were identified in viruses collected from six patients in the family case cluster. Previous reports from the World Health Organization and other experts gave the impression that only a few mutations had been found.The case cluster in North Sumatra involved a 37-year-old woman who apparently contracted the virus from poultry and then passed it to six relatives before she died. One of those six, a 10-year-old boy, then passed the virus to his father. WHO officials said last month that a specific mutation found in the boy and his father marked the first laboratory confirmation of human-to-human transmission of the virus.On May 23, the WHO said genetic sequencing of two viruses from the case cluster had shown “no evidence of genetic reassortment with human or pig influenza viruses and no evidence of significant mutations.” A month later, at the end of an avian flu conference in Jakarta, WHO officials told reporters the virus had mutated slightly when it infected the 10-year-old boy, and the same mutation showed up in his father. The mutation didn’t make the virus more transmissible or virulent, officials said.The genetic data obtained by Nature came from a presentation by University of Hong Kong virologist Malik Peiris at a closed session of the Jakarta meeting in June, the article says.The magazine says that 21 mutations were identified in a virus from the father of the 10-year-old boy, involving seven of the virus’s eight genes, suggesting that the virus was evolving rapidly as it spread. In addition, from one to four mutations were found in viruses collected from five other patients.The story says one of the mutations confers resistance to the antiviral drug amantadine, a finding not reported by the WHO.However, the virus did not spread beyond the extended family, as the article notes. “Many of the genetic changes did not result in the use of different amino acids by the virus,” the story says. “And there were no amino-acid changes in key receptor binding sites known to affect pathogenicity and transmissibility.”According to the magazine, viruses from six of the eight cases in the cluster have been sequenced, but the WHO has not shared the findings, saying they belong to Indonesia. The data have been released only to a few researchers linked to the WHO and the US Centers for Diseases Control and Prevention, the story says.Virologists quoted by the journal asserted that the withholding of sequence data on H5N1 is hindering scientists’ understanding of the virus. But WHO staff member Paul Gully replied, according to the article, that the agency’s job is investigating outbreaks, not doing academic research, and that labs don’t have the time or resources to do “high-quality sequencing” during outbreaks.See also:May 23 WHO statement on genetic data from the case clusterhttp://www.who.int/csr/don/2006_05_23/en/index.htmlJun 23 CIDRAP News story “H5N1 mutation showed human transmission in Indonesia”last_img read more

Continue Reading

Split “metro”: By train from Kopilica to the city port in 4 minutes

first_imgRELATED NEWS: The high-speed city railway, or the Split metro as they call it from miles away, will depart every 20 minutes, with the journey on that stretch lasting only four minutes. The price of a one-way ticket is 11 kuna, and passengers will be able to use the same ticket in other areas of the city bus transport.  City trains on the route Kopilica-Gradska luka and vice versa will run every 20 minutes, while the ticket price will be 11.00 kuna per person in one direction. With one-way regulation of road traffic in the city port and the introduction of new bus and railway lines, which will increase throughput and reduce waiting, the goal of this project is to provide quality intermodal service and traffic relief of the City of Split. As they point out from the city of Split, the organization of the Main Railway Station in Kopilica and the introduction of the city railway in the public transport service is expected to reduce the pressure of vehicles, especially tourist buses to the city center, and passengers can get to the center by train in 4 minutes which is valid for rail and bus hour. Photos: HZPP According to the new changes, disembarkation and embarkation of passengers from tourist buses at the terminals at the Tourist Palace on the Riva will be possible, but with a limit of 15 minutes, and each stop for embarkation and disembarkation will cost 400 kuna, ie a total of 800 kuna. Note, UHPA agreed at a meeting with the city of Split that pre-agreed and announced groups by tour operators and travel agencies in 2019 will be realized under the same conditions as before, and the new prices are valid for all from 2020. (more on the whole issue in the attachment) The City of Split has introduced changes in the regulation of public city transport as well as stationary traffic for tourist buses in the area of ​​the narrower and wider city center. The feasibility study is currently being prepared for the connection of the air and ferry port by rail, after which further activities necessary for the realization of this project will continue. According to the results of the Feasibility Study, the Terms of Reference will be supplemented and the activities of conducting a public tender for the preparation of project documentation and obtaining permits would begin. Specifically, this means that the disembarkation and embarkation of passengers from tourist buses will be organized along the railway platform in Kopilica, where a parking lot for tourist buses with 48 seats will be opened. The daily parking ticket for tourist buses will be 120 kuna, as has been the price for parking in Dračevac so far. Tickets will be sold at the box offices of Promet and HŽ Putnički prijevoz. City-suburban trains on the route Split Predgrađe (Kopilica) – Split (city port) will run on average every 24 minutes, and the train ride takes 4 minutes.       ANNEX: TIMETABLE Split – Suburbs of Split / Suburbs of Split – Split Yesterday, the first city-suburban train started on the route Split Predgrađe (Kopilica) – Split (city port), which started the realization of the project of connecting with the high-speed suburban railway station Split. Interestingly the historic first run was delayed by three minutes. “The goal is to connect the airport and Split’s City Port, the two busiest ports on the eastern Adriatic coast with almost nine million passengers. When we add to that the four cities connected by the railway, then it is quite clear that we could not have started this project without HŽ Putnički prijevoz, HŽ Infrastruktura, the Split city companies Promet and Split – parking. This is just the first step of something that we will achieve in the years ahead, and because of the better quality of life of our fellow citizens. We are aware of the daily, high traffic between Split and other nearby cities and outside the tourist season. In order to relieve the traffic in the center of Split, we are taking a number of measures, such as the purchase of new city buses, the preparation of city and electric bicycle systems, as well as the reform of the city parking system. Changes in the relief of city traffic are underway. It is up to us all to get used to the changes and the new system together and to encourage the railway as a relief”Said the first man of the city of Split, Mayor Krstulović Opara. The new traffic regulation means that one-way traffic will be introduced in the City Port, while the main railway station will be organized in Kopilica. Also, the above-mentioned city railway line Kopilica – Gradska luka was introduced, so that tourists, after getting off the bus, could reach the city center by rail.  Also, it is planned to introduce the line Prometa doo Split on the route Airport – Kaštel Stari and joint tickets Promet doo – HŽPP for the route Zračna luka – Kaštel Stari – Split station (city port). / / / COMMON SENSE HAS OVERCOME IN THE CITY OF SPLIT: PRE-AGREED AND ANNOUNCED GROUPS WILL BE REALIZED UNDER THE SAME CONDITIONS AS BEFORElast_img read more

Continue Reading