911 dispatcher helps save 1-year-old boy who nearly drowned on Christmas

911 dispatcher helps save 1-year-old boy who nearly drowned on Christmas

first_imgiStock(ORLANDO) — A Florida fire department released audio of a frightening 911 call on Tuesday, capturing a dispatcher as she coached a caller through how to save a 1-year-old boy’s life.The scary moment happened on Christmas Day at around 3 p.m. when an Orange County woman dialed 911 after her baby fell into a pool. She said the infant slipped out of the family’s back door and walked right into the backyard pool.The audio documented the Orange County Fire Authority operator as she gave the caller step-by-step instructions on how to resuscitate the boy.The mother, with the help of a neighbor, gave the baby CPR until paramedics arrived to take him to the hospital.As of Thursday morning, the baby’s family said they’re waiting for him to transition out of the hospital’s intensive care unit. They’re hoping to bring him home by next week.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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UK: HMS Tyne Leads the Way in International Exercise

first_img View post tag: Tyne View post tag: Exercise View post tag: Naval Share this article Portsmouth-based fishery protection vessel HMS Tyne met with her Irish and French counterparts in a joint exercise off the Isle of Wight designed to put them through their paces and improve ways of working.HMS Tyne led Irish ships LE Orla, LE Eithne and the French FS Pluvier in the four-day training exercise designed to improve co-operation and co-ordination between vessels which share the same aim of protecting their nation’s territorial waters and enforcing fishery controls.Whilst the UK Fishery Protection Squadron holds annual exercises at sea this was the first time these ships had worked together.Rigorous exercises in the English Channel included Tyne displaying her capabilities in close-range ship manoeuvring and fire and damage control techniques whilst LE Eithne and LE Orla conducted a demonstration of maritime security boarding techniques on Tyne and Pluvier.The ship convoy made an impressive sight entering Portsmouth, with Tyne leading the patrol vessels past Round Tower and into the harbour.Once alongside the ships swapped co-operation at sea for friendly competition in the sporting arena, with all nations fielding teams in a five-a-side football tournament and tug of war.Lieutenant Dave Greenwood the Navigating Officer of HMS Tyne said,“This was an important and highly rewarding exercise for all of the participating units, although we regularly train with other Nations this is the first time these particular units have operated together and it has proved extremely beneficial training for all of us.”Commanding Officer of HMS Tyne, Lieutenant Commander Bob Laverty, added,“This was a great opportunity to work with our Irish and French neighbours furthering our mutual understanding of the best methods to maintain the safety and integrity of our waters.“Working in concert with our partners is vital to ensure we provide the best and most efficient service through our collective efforts.”Having completed the exercise all the ships headed back to sea to continue with their day job of patrolling territorial waters to secure fish stocks and maintain security at sea.[mappress]Press Release, October 02, 2013; Image: Royal Navy UK: HMS Tyne Leads the Way in International Exercise View post tag: Defense View post tag: Defence View post tag: Navy View post tag: HMS View post tag: leads October 2, 2013 View post tag: News by topic View post tag: way Back to overview,Home naval-today UK: HMS Tyne Leads the Way in International Exercise Training & Education View post tag: Internationallast_img read more

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MEDICARE SEMINAR  SET FOR WEDNESDAY, JULY 27th

first_imgSenior Connection will hold a Medicare Prescription Drug Plan and medical billing seminar Wednesday, July 27th, at 9:00 a.m. at 951 S. Hebron Ave., Suite C (between Bellemeade and Washington Ave.) adjacent to the Senior Connection Office.Drug plans, deductibles, donut holes…do you have questions or are you confused about your prescription drug plan? Are you tearing your hair out trying to make sense of the last medical bill you received?  We can help! Plan on attending our new seminar, which focuses on understanding your drug plan and medical billing questions.This is an informational program only. No specific plans or companies will be discussed. The seminar will be presented by Jennifer Cross, Part D Sales of Senior Connection. It is free but registration is required. Call Senior Connection at 812-473-7271 or toll free at 800-258-7610 for reservations and directions.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Press release: Salisbury incident: Foreign Secretary statement on OPCW report

first_img Media enquiries Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson said: Email [email protected] Today the international chemical weapons watchdog have confirmed the findings of the United Kingdom relating to the identity of the toxic chemical used in the attempted assassination of Mr Skripal and his daughter, and which also resulted in the hospitalisation of a British police officer. That was a military grade nerve agent – a Novichok. This is based on testing in 4 independent, highly reputable laboratories around the world. All returned the same conclusive results. There can be no doubt what was used and there remains no alternative explanation about who was responsible – only Russia has the means, motive and record. We invited the OPCW to test these samples to ensure strict adherence to international chemical weapons protocols. We have never doubted the analysis of our scientists at Porton Down. In the interest of transparency, and because unlike the Russians we have nothing to hide, we have asked the OPCW to publish the executive summary for all to see and to circulate the full report to all state parties of the OPCW, including Russia. We will now work tirelessly with our partners to help stamp out the grotesque use of weapons of this kind and we have called a session of the OPCW Executive Council next Wednesday to discuss next steps. The Kremlin must give answers. We must, as a world community, stand up for the rules based order which keeps us all safe. The use of weapons of this kind can never be justified, and must be ended. Follow the Foreign Office on Twitter @foreignoffice and Facebook Follow the Foreign Secretary on Twitter @BorisJohnson and Facebook For journalists Read the note by the OPCW Technical Secretariat and find out more about how the UK government responded to the Salisbury nerve agent attack. Further information OPCW findings Follow the Foreign Office on Instagram, YouTube and LinkedInlast_img read more

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News story: MOD launches biggest ever mental health awareness week with new confidential support for personnel on operations

first_imgThis comes as the MOD announces a series of new joint projects with leading mental health charity Samaritans.The initiatives, backed by £3.5 million in LIBOR funding, will build on the charity’s digital technology to offer military personnel at home and on operations abroad access to confidential support. Online and face to face training in listening skills will also be offered to serving personnel and families, in order to give them confidence and expertise in encouraging others to not suffer in silence.As part of the partnership with Samaritans, a confidential webchat service is being developed allowing military personnel, who often live in shared living quarters, particularly when serving on operations abroad, the ability to talk in confidence with a trained staff. Pocket guides are also being produced which will provide information and emotional support for when people are in isolated locations, particularly on operations.Samaritan volunteers with military experience will also be trained in how to address mental health issues in a military environment, based on cutting-edge research from King’s College London.Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson said: We are absolutely committed to making sure that no one in our military suffers in silence. I’ve stepped up our support for mental health in the Armed Forces, with an extra £2 million of funding a year and a new 24-hour mental health hotline. I’m delighted to announce that personnel serving abroad will be able to access a new confidential system to help them in their time of need. A range of events and activities will take place across the military and the MOD to mark Mental Health Awareness Week.Civilian and military teams are being encouraged to use the week to hold conversations on mental health issues. Managers, using the recently launched Mental Health Guide for Managers, will also outline the support which is available across the MOD, including the recently launched Combat Stress 24-hour mental health hotline. Discussions on stress and resilience will be held on the MOD’s internal Defence Blog, the Land Warfare Centre will hold a wellbeing symposium and Joint Forces Command will also promote an online self-help programme available to personnel.Minister for Defence People and Veterans Tobias Ellwood said: We have long recognised the importance of treating the physical effects of battle but any invisible scars experienced by our brave service personnel were given less attention. We are determined to change this and encourage a more open culture in talking about mental health. With our comprehensive mental health and wellbeing strategy, 20 specialist military mental health sites around the country, a 24/7 helpline and a partnership with the Royal Foundation, we are now far better placed to provide the comprehensive support our armed forces deserve. As we mark Mental Health Awareness Week, I want everyone in the military to adopt the mindset that mental wellbeing matters just as much as physical health. The Defence Secretary in February increased funding for Armed Forces mental health services to £220 million over the next decade and launched the new 24/7 Military Mental Health Helpline, in conjunction with Combat Stress. The new number – 0800 323 4444 – has already received over 350 calls.The MOD currently has a network of 20 ‘hub and spoke’ mental health centres, comprising of 11 hubs and a further nine teams. Regular visiting clinics are also held at other military centres across the country.Last year the MOD launched its Defence People Mental Health and Wellbeing Strategy focusing on preventative measures to protect our personnel. MOD also partnered with the Royal Foundation, a charity set up by the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and Prince Harry, to improve training and education alongside the strategy to promote mental fitness.There are a range of services provided by partners working with MOD and through the Armed Forces Covenant, including the NHS, other Government departments and charities, which serving personnel, veterans, and their families can access.last_img read more

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Affordable housing, saved

first_imgRepresentatives from the state, Harvard University, and the city of Cambridge joined with elected officials, affordable-housing advocates, and local residents on Feb. 8 to celebrate preserving the affordability of 25 homes in Chapman Arms Apartments in Harvard Square.The success resulted from a partnership between the city and Harvard, since the University holds the ground lease for the building, and the agreement was the first implementation of the state’s new preservation statute, Chapter 40 T.“The accomplishment of preserving affordable units in the heart of Harvard Square is such a tribute to the commitment of the Cambridge City Council,” said Bob Healy, city manager, who is also the managing trustee of the Cambridge Affordable Housing Trust and has worked to strengthen affordable housing during his 30 years with the city. “It’s also important to remember all that Harvard has done in partnership with the city of Cambridge in the area of affordable housing.”“This is what it means to preserve homes, and it’s not just preserving where people sleep at night, but how they live their lives,” said Marjorie Decker, the Cambridge city counselor who received word last spring that the apartments were in jeopardy. The officials had gathered for the celebration in a crowded room at the Harvard Kennedy School.Last April, residents of Chapman Arms, which is also known as Craigie Arms, grew concerned when their apartment building of 25 affordable units was put up for sale. With affordability restrictions on the units scheduled to expire in 2016, the units were an attractive investment for buyers interested in converting them to market-rate housing.Cambridge officials, residents, Harvard, affordable-housing advocates, developers, funders, and the state all participated in solving the problem.Working together, the city, Harvard, and the nonprofit Homeowner’s Rehab Inc. (HRI) were able to orchestrate HRI’s purchase of the building to ensure affordability of the 25 units for a minimum of 50 years. Harvard amended and extended its ground lease on the property in a manner that allowed HRI to secure the necessary financing from the Cambridge Affordable Housing Trust and the Community Economic Development Assistance Corporation (CEDAC). HRI purchased the building in a preservation transaction that was finalized on Dec. 19.Attending the ceremony were Cambridge City Manager Robert W. Healy (from left), Harvard Vice President for Campus Services Lisa Hogarty, Cambridge City Councilor Marjorie Decker, Undersecretary of the DHCD Aaron Gornstein, Executive Director of HRI Peter Daly, and Executive Director of CEDAC Roger Herzog.Chapman Arms was the first preservation acquisition to utilize Chapter 40T, the state’s new innovative expiring-use law that was pushed through by housing advocates and elected officials, including Rep. Kevin Honan of Allston-Brighton and longtime Rep. Alice Wolf of Cambridge, who spearheaded passing the legislation.Healy noted Harvard’s long history of supporting affordable housing in Cambridge, from the sale in the 1990s of 100 units to the city for the below-market rate of $32,000 each, to the creation of the 20/20/2000 program, a $20 million, 20-year, low-interest, revolving loan program that has helped to create 465 affordable units in Cambridge. He also acknowledged Harvard’s involvement in the effort, as holder of the ground lease on the property, which allowed the deal to come together.“It’s always nice to thank your host, but they deserve it,” said Healy. “They really have been a key player in the support of affordable housing in Cambridge for a very long time.”Lisa Hogarty, Harvard’s vice president for campus services, lauded the town-gown partnership, saying, “The city of Cambridge and Harvard have enjoyed a long and successful track record of working together to address the quality of life in the city. By any measure, Chapman Arms is an affordable-housing success story.”For Chapman Arms resident Linda Jordon, the success story is personal, since “This means 25 people will have a home.”last_img read more

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EXPLAINER: How Trump’s second impeachment trial will work

first_imgWASHINGTON (AP) — Soon the Senate will have to decide whether to convict former President Donald Trump for incitement of insurrection. Trump’s impeachment trial begins in earnest Tuesday, the first for a president no longer in office. Senators will sit at their desks and listen to hours of testimony about the violent mob of Trump supporters who laid siege to the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. The House impeached Trump on Jan. 13, one week after the violence. Republicans and Trump’s lawyers argue that the trial is unnecessary, and even unconstitutional, because Trump is no longer president and cannot be removed from office.last_img read more

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Happy Light benefits college during winter

first_imgSaint Mary’s is offering a solution to its students’ weather-induced woes. The Happy Light, available in Women’s Health by appointment only, imitates sunlight with special fluorescent bulbs that are twenty-five times brighter than normal bulbs. Students are welcomed and encouraged to take advantage of the pseudo-sunlight, director of Women’s Health Elizabeth Fourman said. “The counselors had been reading about the benefits of the Happy Light for years, so we finally purchased our Happy Light in the fall of 2010,” she said. “It’s used to treat SAD (Seasonal Affective Disorder), which is prevalent in the northern U.S.” Up to 25 percent of people in the northern U.S. have some symptoms of SAD, Fourman said, and the disorder is more prevalent in females, which made Saint Mary’s an ideal location for the light. With lows in the 10s and highs in the 40s this winter season, Fourman said South Bend’s weather may be detrimental to academic success. For those afflicted with the disorder, the environmental inconsistencies are hazardous to both physical and emotional health. Consistent exposure to sunlight or artificial light may mitigate the effects of the disorder. Fourman said those who have used the light usually notice a small improvement in mood and energy. “There is a direct correlation to improved symptoms with regular use,” she said. “The symptoms of SAD also improve with regular exercise, good nutrition, hydration, counseling, regular sleep cycle and for some, medication.” Saint Mary’s is not the only school to try this unconventional method, Fourman said. “I don’t know of any locally, but some schools with multiple lights rent them for a week at a time, or have students check them out from the library, and some have students schedule appointments like we do here,” she said. Ideally, the light should be used daily, Fourman said, but with students’ busy schedules, that often is not an option. Typical sessions run from 15 to 60 minutes, but most people use it for about half an hour. “Students start making appointments for the Happy Light in November. The most we’ve had in one week is 11, but usually it’s less than that,” said Fourman. Sophomore Logan Nevonen visited the light for the first time last year. “I hadn’t heard of it before and I thought I would try it because I was not feeling like myself. I was pretty down,” said Nevonen. The Texas native went to the Happy Light twice a week for about three weeks and did homework. “Girls from warmer climates request the Happy Light more frequently,” Fourman said. “Our dreary weather can last for months, and a lot of us forget what the sun looks like until it comes back in the spring. Many students who come from a more sunny climate have a difficult time adjusting to our clouds.” Unfortunately, the light’s effects do not work for everyone. “I didn’t feel any different than I had before I tried it, so I decided not to go back. It didn’t work for me,” said Nevonen.last_img read more

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Students look to implement Wi-Fi filter to limit pornography use

first_imgChris Collins | The Observer Members of Students for Child-Oriented Policy advocate for filters that would make accessing pornography more difficult.Senior and SCOP member Carolyn Ebner said they hope to foster productive dialogue about the issue.“I think it’s not something people are willing to talk about, which is the trouble, so I think our primary goal for this week is to draw attention to that and try to remove the silence and shame around it,” Ebner said.The University forbids the use of its Wi-Fi network to view porn, but the policy is difficult to enforce while respecting the privacy of students. The filter, while it would not be the end-all solution to the issue of pornography on campus, would send an important message and force students to consider their actions more fully, Ebner said.“Putting a filter in, first of all, is technologically extremely difficult to do, to actually filter out all the websites that would provide pornography for people,” Ebner said. “So, from our point of view, it’s more like a symbolic statement from the University. … It’s not going to stop the people who are really watching and using it, but for people trying to stop, it’s one more check on them to be like, ‘Okay, is this something I actually want to do?’” Senior and SCOP member Maria Kunath said while efforts to prevent others from viewing pornography may make it more difficult to access, the users must ultimately make the decision themselves.“We are not going to stop pornography use,” Kunath said. “If this petition passes, that’s not going to say that everyone who has ever looked at pornography is never going to do it again in their lives, but we’re hoping that people stop and think.”Kunath said SCOP comes at the issue of pornography from a variety of angles, including Catholic teaching. The Church condemns porn as objectification of human beings made in God’s image and a violation of human dignity, she said.“We’re hoping that a block, if it goes through, gives people pause and they say, ‘Okay, why is that?’” she said. “Why does the Church teach that about human sexuality? Is it good, is it bad, is this something I do, how does this affect my life? We’re hoping that the filter is a moment for a lot of people to pause and think and say, ‘What’s porn? Why am I using it? Why does Notre Dame think it’s bad?’” The ultimate solution, Ebner said, has to come from students’ challenging and supporting their peers — something she has already seen among her own friends.“The biggest thing with WRAP Week is that we’re not expecting this to fix the problem, but we just want to get people talking about it,” Ebner said. “And I don’t think the University taking giant actions is going to be the most effective thing. I think the most effective thing is for groups of friends to start talking about it and holding each other accountable and give each other permission to be real and vulnerable with each other. I think the realest help is going to come from friendships.” Tags: filter, pornography, Students for Child Oriented Policy, White Ribbon Against Pornography, Wi-Fi, WRAP To conclude White Ribbon Against Pornography (WRAP) — a weeklong effort to bring attention to the consequences widespread pornography use can have on relationships and human sexuality — Students for Child-Oriented Policy (SCOP) invited students to offer their support for a filter that would block porn websites on Notre Dame Wi-Fi. Members set up tables outside North and South Dining Halls around lunchtime, seeking to engage their peers in conversation.last_img read more

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Cabaret Undressed! The True Stories Behind the Broadway Hit

first_imgBroadway Tug-of-WarAfter his musical The Boy Friend became a big hit in the West End and on Broadway in the mid-’50s, composer/lyricist Sandy Wilson adapted I Am A Camera into a musical, only to find that the rights had been scooped up by producer Harold Prince. Prince commissioned Joe Masteroff to write the musical’s book, but the pair agreed that Wilson’s take on the material didn’t feel authentic to 1920s Berlin. Instead, they enlisted John Kander and Fred Ebb to write the score, and Wilson got the boot. If You’ve Got It, Flaunt It21 years after he first put on his Emcee’s dingy suspenders and nipple glitter, Cumming is returning to Broadway in the role that made him a star. “It starts rehearsals the day after my 49th birthday,” Cumming teased in The Aesthete. “So I’ll be entering my 50th year dancing my tits off and being a sexpot.” Thank God, he says, for muscle memory! Sam Mendes Made it Seedier…In 1993, Donmar Warehouse artistic director Sam Mendes revived the stage musical at the non-for-profit theater in London’s Covent Garden, starring then-unknown Scottish actor Alan Cumming as the Emcee and Jane Horrocks as Sally. The director made it just as game-changing as the original—he stripped down the material, sat the audience at tables and let them order drinks, and was one of the first directors to cast actor-musicians to be both the ensemble and the band. Best of all, the production got the stamp of approval from John Kander. “[Alan Cumming] is disgusting,” the composer told Mendes with delight. “He’s right in your face.” Related Shows Cabaret Redefining BroadwayWhen Cabaret opened in 1966, it turned the idea of a Broadway musical on its head. There was no overture—instead, audiences were caught off-guard by a drumroll and loud cymbal crash. A giant mirror reflected the audience back on itself. The story dealt with everything from anti-Semitism to abortion, which was unusual for the day. “This marionette’s-eye view of a time and place in our lives that was brassy, wanton, carefree and doomed to crumble is brilliantly conceived,” wrote New York Times critic Walter Kerr. The Evolution of the EmceeWhen it came to creating the world of Cabaret, director Hal Prince recalled his own time in Germany as a young man in the army—specifically a Stuttgart nightclub called Maxim’s. “There was a dwarf MC, hair parted in the middle and lacquered down with brilliantine, his mouth made into a bright red cupid’s bow, who wore heavy false eyelashes,” Prince explained in The Making of Cabaret. Joel Grey, who created the role of the Emcee on Broadway, came up with the white-faced, pink-cheeked look that defined the role for decades. “I found this greasepaint called ‘Juvenile Pink,’ and I thought to myself, ‘This creep, he would want to look young, and this is what he would use,'” Grey recalled. Welcome to BerlinThe Weimar Republic, which flourished between Germany’s defeat at the end of World War I and Hitler’s rise to power in 1933, was a vibrant cultural period famous for its music, film, art and philosophy, as well as its tolerance of decadent behavior (including prostitution and homosexuality). 1920s Berlin was the center of Weimar culture, but when the Nazi Party began rising to power, this liberal mecca started crumbling as artists and intellectuals fled to safer shores. …And Wilder…When Roundabout Theatre Company wanted to bring the production to Broadway, Mendes insisted they find an honest-to-God nightclub. After two years, they found Henry Miller’s Theatre (now the Stephen Sondheim), which had previously been a nightclub called Xenon, and before that, an X-rated movie house. Renamed the Kit Kat Klub, the rundown theater’s gritty atmosphere was just the place for the in-your-face revival. View Comments Star Files The Toast of MayfairWhen Cabaret announced its return to Broadway, the question on everyone’s mind was, who will play Sally? Anne Hathaway and Emma Stone were rumored to be interested in the part, but in the end it went to stage newbie Michelle Williams. Williams admitted that being the new girl makes her “feel like a baby” in rehearsal, but she has a champion in Liza Minnelli. “I’m excited to see what they will do with the show and am sure it will be great,” said Minnelli, calling the new star a “wonderful actress.” Come to the Cabaret, Michelle! In here, life is beautiful…See Alan Cumming and Michelle Williams in Cabaret at Studio 54. Show Closed This production ended its run on March 29, 2015 At First, Liza Didn’t Get the PartThe 1972 film version of Cabaret was just as successful as its stage debut, due in part to its magnetic leading lady, Liza Minnelli. But the young actress had initially tried out for the Broadway musical, and didn’t get the part of Sally. “I knew I’d get the movie for some reason,” Minnelli told The Huffington Post. “I remember saying to myself, ‘That’s all right, I’ll do the film.” Minnelli not only got her wish, but she won an Oscar for her performance, alongside original Broadway star Joel Grey as the Emcee and director Bob Fosse. And as an added bonus, the film basically revived the whole concept of the movie musical, which had been languishing for years. Thanks, guys! Capturing a CultureWriter Christopher Isherwood compiled his experiences living in Weimar Berlin into a semi-autobiographical collection of stories, Goodbye to Berlin, in 1939. The character of Sally Bowles was based on German nightclub singer Jean Ross—her name was borrowed from composer Paul Bowles. British playwright John Van Druten adapted Isherwood’s work into the 1951 Broadway play I Am a Camera, which was panned by the critics (Walter Kerr of The New York Times famously said, “Me no Leica”), but won actress Julie Harris the first of five Tony Awards for playing Sally. Alan Cumming Willkommen back to Broadway, Cabaret! The classic Kander and Ebb musical has arrived for a return engagement on the Great White Way, with Alan Cumming reprising his Tony-winning performance as the Emcee alongside Oscar nominee Michelle Williams, who is making her Broadway debut as British cabaret singer Sally Bowles. In the iconic tale set in 1930s Berlin, the Emcee holds court over the seedy Kit Kat Klub, where Sally strikes up a relationship with an American writer, Cliff. Cabaret opens at Studio 54 on April 24, but a classic isn’t born overnight! Read on for a look at what has long made Cabaret such a crowd-pleasing, game-changing favorite. …And It Paid OffCabaret opened on Broadway in 1998 (with some major changes from new co-director and choreographer Rob Marshall) and scooped up Tony Awards for Best Revival, for Cumming, for Natasha Richardson as Sally, and for Ron Rifkin as Herr Schultz. But when a construction crane fell on the Kit Kat Klub, the show had to temporarly close—that is, until Mendes kicked in the doors on the then-derelict Studio 54. “In addition to its rich and varied history, [Studio 54] happens to be the most atmospheric, theatrically viable space that I’ve seen in New York,” he told the Associated Press. Michelle Williamslast_img read more

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