An Antarctic assessment of IPCC AR4 coupled models

An Antarctic assessment of IPCC AR4 coupled models

first_imgWe assess 19 coupled models from the IPCC fourth assessment report archive from the simulation of the 20th century, based on the calculation of ” skill scores.” The models show a wide range of scores when assessed against Antarctic or global measures of large- scale circulation indices. Except for continental mass balance, the model average proves a more reliable estimate than that for any one model. Individual models show a very wide scatter in simulated Antarctic temperature trends over the past century; the large trend over the Antarctic peninsula in winter is not well represented, which makes it clear that whatever has been driving these trends is not well captured by many GCMs. Trends in temperature are clearly linked to the sea ice simulation, another variable that most models do not simulate well.last_img read more

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Phenological matching across hemispheres in a long-distance migratory bird

first_imgAim In the Northern Hemisphere, bird migration from the tropic to the temperate zone in spring is thought to proceed at a rate determined in large part by local phenology. In contrast, little is understood about where birds go or the factors that determine why they move or where they stop during the post-breeding period. Location Study sites were in Oregon, Nebraska and Vermont, and location data we collected extend south to Argentina. Methods We deployed light-level geolocators on individual Bobolinks from three populations across the breeding range and compare their southbound movement phenology to austral greening as indicated by the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index. Results Bobolinks from all breeding populations synchronously arrived and remained for up to several weeks in two sequential, small non-breeding areas that were separated by thousands of kilometres, before staging for pre-alternate moult. Similar to the migration patterns of birds to northern breeding areas, movements into the Southern Hemisphere corresponded to increasing primary productivity. Main conclusions Our findings suggest that the Bobolink’s southbound migration is broadly constrained by resource availability, and its non-breeding distribution has been shaped by the seasonal phenology of grasslands in both time and space. This is the first documentation of individual birds from across a continental breeding range exhibiting phenological matching during their post-breeding southward migration. Known conservation threats overlap temporally and spatially with large concentrations of Bobolinks, and should be closely examined. We emphasize the need to consider how individuals move and interact with their environment throughout their annual cycle and over hemispheric scales.last_img read more

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Online auction bids well for Clive Emson’s sales!

first_imgA fishing lake and wildlife haven (£260,000) near Attleborough, Essex. Britain’s largest independent regional land and property auction firm recorded £14m of sales in its second auction of the year.Due to pandemic measures, Clive Emson cancelled its five March ballroom sales across southern England. Instead, the firm swapped to a broadcast facility for Kent and Essex then switched halfway through to online sales for West Country, Sussex and Surrey and Hampshire and the Isle of Wight.James Emson, MD, said, “It was a week few of us will ever forget – we took the rest of the auction online to comply with the spirit of the lockdown.A historic former wash-house in Bexhill (£37,000), near Hastings in East Sussex. “We were unsure bidders would have an appetite for purchases online at such short notice, but they proved that property and land sells whatever the economic weather.“The online element generated £4m in sales, and overall sales of £13.5m, an incredible result. I pay tribute to my colleagues for doing everything they could to keep the virtual show on the road in the most demanding of circumstances. “We now look ahead to the next series of sales – all online on Wednesday, May 6th.”former wash house Bexhill online property auction auction lots auctioneers Clive Emson virtual auction May 5, 2020Jenny van BredaWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles Letting agent fined £11,500 over unlicenced rent-to-rent HMO3rd May 2021 BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Home » News » Auctions news » Online auction bids well for Clive Emson’s sales! previous nextAuctions newsOnline auction bids well for Clive Emson’s sales!The Negotiator5th May 20200405 Viewslast_img read more

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Ocean City’s 2018 Beach Tag Sales Close to Last Year’s Revenue

first_imgBy Donald WittkowskiAmong New Jersey shore towns, Ocean City is the undisputed king of beach tag sales.It is the only city to annually crack $4 million in annual beach tag revenue. No other town comes close.That’s why Ocean City’s beach tag sales are such a closely watched indicator of the strength of the summer tourism season.So far this year, revenue is pretty much running neck and next with last year’s figures, said Frank Donato, the city’s chief financial officer.Through June 30, the city had $2.612 million in beach tag sales, down slightly from $2.628 million during the same period in 2017.Donato blamed the rainy weather that marred the early part of summer for dampening sales in June, just as the vacation season was getting into full swing.“It was a little slow in June. We had a lot of rain in May and part of June to slow that down,” he said in an interview Thursday.However, Donato was encouraged by the revenue figures through May 31, when beach tags are sold at the discounted preseason price. For that period, the city racked up nearly $2.1 million in revenue, compared to $2 million in 2017.“That’s a good indicator that people are coming in and buying seasonal tags at a discount and locking in their commitment to visit Ocean City in the summer,” Donato said.Frank Donato, chief financial officer, says Ocean City’s 7-mile-long beachfront helps to attract enormous crowds.Figures for beach tag sales in July are expected to be compiled in early August, giving an even more detailed statistical snapshot of whether the city is enjoying a solid or perhaps even spectacular summer.In all, Ocean City reaped $4 million in beach tag revenue in 2017, compared to $4.1 million in 2016. The all-time high of nearly $4.2 million in beach tag revenue came in 2015.Ocean City annually leads all New Jersey shore towns in beach tag sales because of its sheer size, Donato explained.The city’s 7-mile-long beachfront is much bigger than neighboring towns, allowing it to handle enormous crowds. At the peak of the summer vacation season, the number of visitors can swell to about 150,000, compared to Ocean City’s year-round population of 11,700, Donato said.“Ocean City is as big, in many cases, as two or three coastal towns put together,” he said.Beach tag revenue covers the cost of keeping the beaches clean, employing lifeguards, hiring summer police officers and paying for the city’s share of beach replenishment projects in partnership with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.Ocean City reaped $4 million in beach tag revenue in 2017, compared to $4.1 million in 2016. The all-time high of nearly $4.2 million in beach tag revenue came in 2015.Another barometer of the strength of the summer tourism season is parking revenue. Parking data through June showed $738,000 in revenue so far this summer, compared to $607,000 for the same period last year, Donato said.The increase in parking revenue for the early part of summer suggests that the city’s concerts, shows and other special events are drawing visitors to town, even when rainy weather may be keeping them off the beach, Donato pointed out.“It certainly tells you that people were here,” he said. “I think it’s a good sign that we’re offering something for people to do, even if the skies are rainy.”The true “litmus test” for parking revenue will be the figures for July and August, reflecting the height of the summer vacation season, Donato noted.Overall, the city had slightly more than $3 million in parking revenue in 2017, compared to $3.162 million in 2016. The 2016 figure was a record high. Ocean City’s beach tag revenue, which annually tops all New Jersey resort towns, is nearly on par with last year’s figures so far this summer.last_img read more

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Tea academy launched for bakers

first_imgTetley has launched an exclusive Tea Academy to help bakers improve their tea offering.The academy is an online resource that will be kept up-to-date with the latest insight and industry trends.Businesses will also be able to sign-up to a monthly e-newsletter that will provide education on different tea blends, and how to market them simply, by visiting the Tetley Tea Academy website.To launch the Academy, Tetley Tea is offering 10 outlets the chance to win free products as well as advice and insight from its tea experts on how they can make the most from their tea offer. Operators should email their details to [email protected] and the first 10 to respond will win.Dorothy Sieber, Tetley marketing director OOH EMEA, said: “With the launch of the new Tetley Tea Academy we pledge to offer not only commercial promotions, but lend our support and expertise to help drive operators’ tea sales by leading the resurgence of tea out-of-home and exploiting the huge growth potential for tea.“From advice on serving the perfect cup of tea and the art of personalisation, to capitalising on associated food sales and marketing a menu, the Tea Academy is home to practical advice for each and every channel to make their tea offer personal to their customers.“We’re stronger together with our partners and we hope that, as the Tetley Tea Academy develops, it will provide valuable insight and support to the foodservice industry.”last_img read more

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Oliver Adams launches cricket ground store

first_imgOliver Adams, the craft bakery chain, has opened a new shop at Northants Cricket Ground – its first partnership with a sports brand.The company currently operates 28 stores, along with 22 Firkins.Mark Jarvis, Oliver Adams’ managing director, said: “We are proud to have this new association with Northants Cricket. It is our first venture into the sporting scene and makes perfect sense for us as a company to work with the Northants Cricket and build even stronger links with the community here in Northampton.”David Smith, chief executive of Northants Cricket, said: “I am delighted with our new commercial partnership with Oliver Adams which is a very well-known, strong local iconic brand. We believe this will help us fill a gap in our current food offering and we very much look forward to working with our new partners.”The new shop at the County Ground opened for the NatWest T20 Blast game against the Yorkshire Vikings on Friday, June 13.last_img read more

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A look inside: Kirkland House

first_img Conversation starter Kirkland House’s resident scholar, Peter V. Emerson, the mastermind behind the popular series “Conversations with Kirkland,” also introduced the event. Conversations with Kirkland Funny, ha ha The crowd: not laughing yet, but they will laugh. Oh, yes, they will laugh. Funnymen Bobby (right) gets animated. Justin Ide/Harvard Staff Photographer Five staff photographers will offer close-ups of the interests, activities, and personalities inside five Harvard Houses in installments over the course of the academic year. Within the dark-paneled Junior Common Room of Kirkland House, comedic duo Peter and Bobby Farrelly, the masterminds behind the teenage hilarity in the films “Dumb and Dumber” and “There’s Something About Mary,” entertained a crowd recently as part of the popular series “Conversations with Kirkland.”The series, started by Kirkland resident scholar Peter Emerson in 2002 and co-sponsored by the Office for the Arts, featured the New Englanders from Cumberland, R.I., who were introduced as the “renaissance men of comedy” by program coordinator Iris Lee ’12.The brothers, a year and a half apart in age, rapidly fell into a natural, humorous banter, a trait they have shared since childhood. They recounted a short history of their failures locally and a move to Hollywood, and they chalked up much of their success in Tinseltown to their sibling bond.Peter explained that having a brother with you to “fend off the studio” gives them a huge advantage. Having “a brother who is your partner,” he said, “who you also know has your best interests — he’s never going to hurt you — it’s a great thing.” Merrily, merrily, Farrelly The Farrelly brothers’ notorious comedic legacy incorporates films such as “There’s Something about Mary,” “Me, Myself & Irene,” and their first film, “Dumb and Dumber.” Introducing… Iris Lee ’12 coordinated the event and read a brief introduction. Just laid-back guys Peter Farrelly (front) and brother Bobby talk life and career with the Kirkland kids.last_img read more

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New faculty: Martin Surbeck

first_img How violence pointed to virtue A cost of culture Related Growing up, Martin Surbeck knew he wanted a career that involved working with animals, but didn’t imagine he’d go to the African rainforest to do it.During college he conducted research on social insects and birds, but at graduation he got an unusual offer: to establish a bonobo research site in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and habituate the animals to the presence of researchers. And that set him on the path to his current career.“These animals are fascinating to watch, and they’re interesting because we don’t know that much about them,” Surbeck said. “So I spent a year in the Congo, habituating bonobos to humans.”Surbeck, who joined the Department of Human Evolutionary Biology as an assistant professor earlier this year, said his work has helped to fill in the blanks about the animals.Often seen as less aggressive and more sexually active than chimps, bonobos are sometimes called the “hippie apes” — a name Surbeck says obscures many of the most interesting aspects of their society.“Unlike in chimps, bonobo males hardly ever cooperate with each other,” he said. “But what we do see is females supporting each other very frequently. And that’s noteworthy because females don’t have their sisters there, so it’s mainly cooperation between unrelated individuals.”In a study published in November in Hormones and Behavior, Surbeck and colleagues suggest that while same-sex encounters have been observed in bonobo males, they are far more common in females, and could serve as a way to cement those cooperative bonds.,“The females have this specific behavior where they rub their genitals against each other,” he said. “It occurs rather frequently, and it seems to be in situations of high tension — when there is potential conflict you see it happening.”Following those encounters, Surbeck said, the team found increased levels of oxytocin in females. Similar increases were not seen following sexual encounters with males.“Oxytocin is often associate with helping each other,” he said. “We know chimp males, when they go on patrols and attack other groups, they show high oxytocin levels, so it’s not just about sex; it appears to be about holding the group together.”,Surbeck, however, warned against drawing direct lines between same-sex behavior in bonobos and in humans.“This is a behavior which seems to have, in this species, a function in reinforcing cooperation,” he said. “One of the main things they cooperate in is to help each other in these coalitions to kick males out of the feeding trees.”While there are still outstanding questions regarding the social structures among members of bonobo groups, Surbeck said there is evidence suggesting females are often the dominant or co-dominant individual in a group.“There is an idea that maybe these female coalitions are a way for females to attain these high ranks,” he said. “They don’t help each other raise their young; they don’t seem to hunt together; they don’t defend the home range, but maybe as back-up it’s one thing that contributes to their high standing.”,There are still many questions left to answer about bonobos, but Surbeck said what keeps him coming back to the jungle year after year are those unique moments he spends with one of humankind’s closest cousins.“It’s a very simple thing,” he said. “We follow three habituated bonobo communities on a daily basis … so we get up at about 4 a.m. and walk to the nest sites, which change every day, and walk with them. There are times when they go up in a tree, and you might not see anything for 90 minutes.“But sometimes you walk with them alone along a path, and that is just beautiful,” he continued. “More emotionally than scientifically, those are the moments that are super-rewarding.” Primatologist Wrangham’s new book examines the strange relationship between good and evil center_img Written in the bones Study shows how association, learning can lead to exposure to disease Doctoral students describe projects at the cutting edge of evolutionary inquirylast_img read more

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Minnesota case marks 1st detection of Brazil variant in US

first_imgMINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Officials say a new Brazilian variant of the coronavirus has made its first known appearance in the United States in a person who recently traveled from Brazil to Minnesota. State health officials announced Monday that the Brazil P.1 variant was found in a specimen from a Minnesota resident who had recently been to Brazil. The patient lives in the Minneapolis-St. Paul area and became ill during the first week of January. Viruses are constantly mutating, and new versions – called variants – often emerge. Health officials are also worried about variants that were first reported in the United Kingdom and South Africa.last_img read more

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Student organizations sponsor donation drive for local maternity home

first_imgThis week, Saints Mary’s Belles for Life, Student Nurses Association and Campus Ministry joined forces to sponsor a donation drive for expectant and young mothers as well as their chilrden at Hannah’s House, a faith-based maternity home in the local community. “As the only maternity home in the Michiana region, our 24-hour staff offers structure, safety, mentoring and accountability, as well as access to existing community resources for pregnant women and single moms,” Hannah’s House says on their website. “For over 25 years, our services have transformed the lives of hundreds of women and their babies.”Hannah’s House puts an emphasis on providing young, expectant mothers with lodging during their pregnancy, according to their website. However, the organization offers a further range of “programs and services” for young women who are either pregnant or new mothers.“The need for a safe place for young women to live during their pregnancy is an important part of our mission,” their website says. At Hannah’s House, we’ve built upon this foundation with programs and services to provide pregnant moms and their babies a thorough range of programs to help navigate and prepare for a confident, healthy and successful future.”Donation bins were placed in every residence hall at the College, the Cushwa-Leighton Library and Havican Hall to collect the most needed items for guests at Hannah’s House. These included clothing, hygiene products, baby wipes and parenting books. This year’s event represents the first annual Mother and Baby Item Donation Drive, senior Morgan Chichester, president of Belles for Life, said in an email.  “The drive was started as an opportunity to honor October’s nationwide Respect Life Month and [to] support Saint Mary’s community partners,” Chichester. said “The success of this drive was due to the collaboration of different organizations.”Hannah’s House, located in Mishawaka, provides shelter to both pregnant and single young women who are already mothers in the greater South Bend area. Being a Catholic organization, Saint Mary’s Campus Ministry has established a relationship to be a campus partner. “It is an honor to support Hannah’s House,” Chichester said.Other events designed to raise awareness for Respect Life Month included t-shirt sales and keynote speakers discussing pro-life issues.Students involved with Belles for Life and Student Nurses Association were responsible for advertising the donation drive and for encouraging members of their organizations to support the cause.Despite marketing efforts made by these organizations, many students on campus were unaware the drive was going on. Junior Emma Cassidy said she did not know the donation drive was taking place this week. “If I would have known I would have made an effort to donate something,” said Cassidy. “There are so many events and fundraisers occurring on campus it is hard to tell one from the other.”The drive will conclude this coming Sunday.Tags: Belles for Life, Hannah’s House, Student Nurses Associationlast_img read more

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