Warriors owner’s wife says interaction with Jay-Z, Beyonce led to death threats

Warriors owner’s wife says interaction with Jay-Z, Beyonce led to death threats

first_img Written by Jay-Z and Beyoncé are courtside for Game 3 pic.twitter.com/6mmJuN8Odn— ESPN (@espn) June 6, 2019Curran had been portrayed as drawing disdain from Beyonce. But she says she was just being a good host to her NBA Finals guests and asking Jay-Z what he wanted to drink.“There was no hostility, I was trying to be a good hostess,” she told ESPN. “I’ve never experienced cyber bullying like this. I can’t believe our players go through this. That kids go through this.”Beyonce’s team seems to be shutting down those fake rumors as well. Her publicist released a statement of support for Curran on Instagram. Yvette Noel-Schure posted a photo of Beyonce and Jay-Z and wrote, “I am looking back today at the start of The OTRII tour, one year ago. It was a place of joy, unimaginable entertainment from two of the best performers in the world, and a place of love. Every single day on that tour I saw love. Which is why I also want to speak here to the beautiful BeyHiVE.”She continued, “I know your love runs deep but that love has to be given to every human. It will bring no joy to the person you love so much if you spew hate in her name. We love you.” While she hasn’t commented herself on the bullying Curran has received, Beyonce has also been spreading the love like Noel-Schure.She posted a few pics from the AFI Gala with her dear friend, Melina Matsoukas. Beyonce and AFI honored the director with the Franklin J. Schaffner Alumni Medal. “Melina, I’m so proud of you my sister. Love you deep,” she wrote.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved. June 7, 2019 /Sports News – National Warriors owner’s wife says interaction with Jay-Z, Beyonce led to death threats FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailThearon W. Henderson/Getty Images(OAKLAND, Calif.) — The wife of Golden State Warriors owner says that a viral exchange from earlier this week between her, Jay Z and Beyonce resulted in online bullying and death threats. Nicole Curran, who is married Joe Lacob, spoke to ESPN about the moment earlier this week in which she leaned over to talk to Jay-Z — prompting Beyonce to look down and stop smiling during the courtside exchange.It really doesn’t look like all that much, but social media has been known to attack for less. In this case, Curran says she’s received death threats. Beau Lundlast_img read more

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The Killers Honor Tom Petty With Joyful “American Girl” At Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame Inductions [Video]

first_imgOn Saturday night, the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame officially welcomed their 2018 induction class at a lavish ceremony at Cleveland’s Public Hall. As always, the night was filled with star-studded performances celebrating the evening’s guests of honor. This year, the Rock Hall inducted Bon Jovi, Dire Straits, The Moody Blues, The Cars, and Nina Simone in addition to “Early Influencer” Sister Rosetta Tharpe.The Killers‘ frontman Brandon Flowers was perviously tapped to give the induction speech for The Cars, one of his biggest early influences. However, he wound up playing a much bigger role in the show than expected, as The Killers opened the ceremony with an un-scheduled performance of Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers‘ “American Girl” (complete with “Free Fallin’” vocal quotes) in honor of the recently-departed rock legend, who himself was inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 2002.As Flowers told Rolling Stone, “To pay tribute to Tom Petty who has just done nothing but enrich our lives, and then for me to get to induct the Cars into the Hall of Fame, I mean, this is a hell of a night for me. People don’t realize how New Wave Tom Petty was. You don’t associate him with that movement at all, but a lot of those videos, and even some of the sentiments in the songs and the way that they’re presented were very New Wave. And then he obviously evolved, which, he was so great at that.”Below, you can watch The Killers’ show-opening tribute to Tom Petty at the 2018 Rock & Roll Hall of Fame induction ceremony below:The Killers – “American Girl” (Tom Petty cover) – Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Induction[Video: MarchofTheRashbaum]The Killers are set to headline a number of large-scale festivals this summer, including Boston Calling, BottleRock, Bonnaroo, and Firefly. For a full list of The Killers’ upcoming tour dates, hit the band’s website.[H/T Rolling Stone]last_img read more

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Phil Lesh & The Terrapin Family Band Welcome Eric Krasno, Nicki Bluhm In New York’s Central Park [Photos/Full Video]

first_imgLoad remaining images On Wednesday night, Phil Lesh began a run of Northeast shows at New York’s Central Park SummerStage. In addition to his touring outfit, The Terrapin Family Band, which features Phil’s son and guitarist Grahame Lesh, drummer Alex Koford, guitarist Ross James, and keyboardist Jason Crosby, Phil recruited guitarist Eric Krasno and vocalist Nicki Bluhm for the Central Park performance.The band kicked off the show with a New York-appropriate cover, The Velvet Underground‘s “Sweet Jane”. Next, the band jumped into a cover of Smokey Robinson and the Miracles classic “I Second That Emotion” with Krasno and Bluhm sharing vocal duties. This song has gotten a lot of play from Krasno in the past few weeks in a broad spectrum of settings. Two weekends ago, Krasno performed the song as part of a tribute to Jerry Garcia Band with Lettuce, John Mayer, Bob Weir, and more. Last weekend, he turned in an unplugged version of the song at his intimate Rockwood Music Hall performance.The band continued to spread the vocals around with live Dead favorites like “He’s Gone”, “New Minglewood Blues”, “Brown-Eyed Women”, and “Peggy-O”. “Alligator” was up next, and featured some exploratory improvisation that flirted with the Allman Brothers Band‘s “Blue Sky” before landing in a smoking Nicki Bluhm-sung “Deal” to cap set one.Following a lengthy set break and a meandering intro jam, set two commenced with a delicate “Bird Song” sung by Phil, who milked an extended, tension-building pause amidst the song’s final “I’ll show you/Snow and rain” refrain for added emotional effect. “Truckin’” came next, with Grahame Lesh leading the way on vocals and adding an impressive guitar solo to its closing jam. A highlight of the show, Grahame manned the Dead’s classic on-the-road opus like he was born to play it.An excellent rendition of “Unbroken Chain” followed, featuring a big piano solo from Crosby and a Jimi Hendrix-like solo from Krasno. Visibly delighted by Krasno’s fireworks, a smiling Phil gave some visibly astounded love to the guitarist before beginning “The Wheel”. After covering a little ground on the sing-along favorite (including some teases of The Beatles‘ “Come Together” by Krasno), the band slid into a funky “West L.A. Fadeaway”. Krasno once again took a stellar solo on the “Sugar Magnolia” that followed and continued the trend with a high-energy “Scarlet Begonias”.As “Scarlet” slipped into “Fire on the Mountain”, Bluhm once again took the reins, delivering a stunning vocal performance on the second half of the classic pairing. Finally, Ross James led the way on a fuzz-rock rendition of Bob Dylan‘s “A Hard Rain’s A-Gonna Fall”, his unhinged vocals and wailing guitar highlighting the set-closing number. When Phil returned to the stage for an encore, he thanked the NYC crowd for bringing the absolute best out of the band—as always—before Bluhm led the way on a heartbreakingly soulful reading of “Brokedown Palace”.Phil Lesh’s New York run continues tonight with a sold-out performance at The Capitol Theatre (click here for a webcast of the show). On Friday, Phil will head to Harlem’s iconic Apollo Theater for a HeadCount benefit with some “very special friends” including the Terrapin Family Band, Bluhm, Krasno, Robert Randolph, Talib Kweli, and the Harlem Gospel Choir.For a full list of Phil Lesh’s upcoming tour dates, head to his website here.You can view a gallery of photos from the performance below via photographer Andrew O’Brien, and watch full crowd-shot footage of the performance below via taper Zman (Steven J. Ziegler):Phil Lesh & The Terrapin Family Band w/ Eric Krasno & Nicki Bluhm – 9/5/18 – Set 1Phil Lesh & The Terrapin Family Band w/ Eric Krasno & Nicki Bluhm – 9/5/18 – Set 1Setlist: Phil Lesh & The Terrapin Family Band w/ Eric Krasno & Nicki Bluhm | Central Park SummerStage | New York, NY | 9/5/2018Set One: Sweet Jane, I Second That Emotion, He’s Gone, New Minglewood Blues, Brown-Eyed Women, Peggy-O, Alligator* > DealSet Two: Bird Song > Truckin’, Unbroken Chain > The Wheel > West L.A. Fadeaway, Sugar Magnolia > Scarlet Begonias > Fire on the Mountain, A Hard Rain’s A-Gonna FallEncore: Brokedown Palace*Contained Allman Brothers “Blue Sky” teasePhil Lesh & The Terrapin Family Band w/ Nicki Bluhm & Eric Krasno | Central Park SummerStage | New York, NY | 9/5/2018 | Photo: Andrew O’Breinlast_img read more

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Sticking together

first_imgMost people expect to put on a few pounds over the holiday season — and spend January paying for it. But not Kathryn Kunkel.“I feel like I’ve gotten in better shape since November,” says the Th.D. program administrator. “And I’m more aware of what I’m eating.”In better shape? Since November?That’s right. Because Kunkel, along with about 200 of her colleagues from around the University, participated in Maintain Don’t Gain this year. Co-sponsored by the Harvard Recreation Department and the Center for Wellness, the program pits teams of four to six people against each other for prizes such as personal training sessions, private classes for the team, a massage, a team lunch — “and bragging rights,” says Kerry L. Smith, programs manager and a personal trainer at Hemenway Gymnasium. “It’s very big at Harvard to say that you won.”But winning, in this case, doesn’t mean losing weight, as it would in most gym-centered programs.“You can’t gain or lose more than 2 pounds either way,” says Jeanne Mahon, director of the Center for Wellness. “So if you’re 128 when you weighed in, you need to be 126 to 130 when you weigh out.”The team’s total weight is the one that counts, though, so if your four-person team’s total at weigh-in is 600 pounds, at weigh-out — which is coming up this week — it would have to hover between 592 and 608. Raffle prizes are also awarded, with teams getting extra raffle tickets for doing things such as attending classes together.“You can go to the classes for free,” Kunkel says, “and you don’t have to be a gym member.” Water aerobics, yoga, Zumba, and stress management are among the classes for Maintain Don’t Gain participants.“It’s a good way for people, particularly staff members, to sample classes they might not ordinarily do without fighting for space with a zillion undergraduates,” says Kunkel. “It’s a way to ease into it so it’s not so intimidating.”If you’re kicking yourself for not joining Maintain Don’t Gain when it started, don’t worry: You have a second chance. Maintain Don’t Gain may be over for the year, but a new program is just beginning. Team Fitness Challenge starts Jan. 31 and runs until March 11, and is similar to Maintain Don’t Gain in that it’s team-oriented, giving you motivation beyond just that little pinch of love handle.“Team Fitness Challenge is our most popular program,” says Christina Hoff, Fitness Program manager at Hemenway. Unlike for Maintain Don’t Gain, Team Fitness Challenge team members do have to belong to the gym — but the staff rate for membership is just $24 a year. Another difference is that rather than racking up raffle tickets, team members rack up points, with a daily maximum to discourage overtraining, by spending time in the gym; extra points are awarded for attendance at group exercise classes.If past years are any indication, many Maintain Don’t Gain alumni will go on to Team Fitness Challenge. “Now that they know how to maintain, they can lose weight with this next step,” says Smith. “Maintain Don’t Gain is a gateway to weight loss, helping people to make lifestyle changes for long-term health and fitness. You need to maintain your weight before you can lose.”Last year, Andrew Yahkind, J.D. ’10, organized a Team Fitness Challenge group of third-year law students.“I think generally I ended up in better shape,” he says. “You get stuck in a gym routine of doing the same thing day in and day out, and this forced us all to give something else a try. I’m a former frat boy from Michigan who’s spent a lot of time lifting and running, and I took a water aerobics class. It’s not something I stuck with, but I’m glad I was able to try it. We pushed each other to go into the gym more, and when the competition ended, we were sort of in that routine. It forces you to get into the groove of taking care of your health and fitness.”last_img read more

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Pocket change

first_imgWhen Apple CEO Tim Cook announced the rollout of the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus last month, the most intriguing news nugget he shared had nothing to do with larger display screens or improved cameras. Rather, it was the fact that users of iPads, Apple Watches, and the latest iPhones would be able to make purchases via the company’s new, proprietary mobile payment platform, Apple Pay.By aiming their iPhones at so-called NFC terminals, customers can access their credit or debit card information to buy goods and services without swiping or handing cards to store clerks. Retailers will record the sales by using random, tokenized numbers, rather than by including customers’ names, card numbers, and expiration dates. The system is designed to minimize the risks from widespread data breaches like those at retailers such as Target and Home Depot. Apple says the firm will not save financial or other identifying information on its servers, nor will it share customer transaction data. Major retail chains, including Whole Foods, Walgreens, and Staples, have signed on to accept Apple Pay, as have American Express, Visa, and MasterCard.The debut of Apple Pay this week came as the company announced a record-breaking $8.5 billion in net profit for the quarter ending Sept. 27, driven largely by sales of 39 million iPhone 6 and 6 Pluses, its most successful iPhone launch ever.Skeptics caution that Apple’s entry into mobile payments may not be the start of an iTunes-like rise to market domination. While the company’s deep pockets, strong global name recognition, and customer loyalty — particularly among young consumers — do give the company a leg up, Apple Pay does not work on older iPhone models or on Android phones, leaving plenty of room for Google Wallet, PayPal, SoftCard, and other competing services working to wean people from their cash- and card-carrying habits. Sunil Gupta, the Edward W. Carter Professor of Business Administration at Harvard Business School (HBS), studies the impact of digital technology on consumer behavior. He is also chairman of the general marketing department and co-chairs the executive education program on digital and social strategy at HBS. Gupta spoke with the Gazette about Apple Pay, and the future implications for the company and for the way we shop.GAZETTE: What distinguishes Apple Pay from others already in this market?GUPTA: First of all, there’s the image of Apple as a technology leader and the fact that they can build it into the iPhone and all the other components. The second difference is, because of the brand power of Apple as well as the overall company stature, they have been able to link it with major players like MasterCard, Visa, and American Express — and not only the payment networks, but also several merchants, whether it’s McDonald’s or Home Depot and so forth. So that’s one component. The second component to Apple Pay, one of the key benefits they’re arguing more than the convenience, is the security. The merchant won’t actually see the card, but will see a randomly generated token that is for one-time use only. So with the thumbprint [ID sensor] on the phone, I think the security will increase dramatically.And the third thing that is happening is the largest payment network companies, like MasterCard and others, are telling the merchants that the merchant terminals that they use at the retail counters should comply with a new chip that’s going to be put into these cards for security purposes, and if they don’t have the new equipment, then any fraud [that occurs], MasterCard, Visa and the banks will not be liable for. One of the biggest hassles that’s been happening for adoption is the merchants didn’t see any benefit, because they have to replace all these terminals for the NFC payments, at their own costs. But if in 2015 they need to change their terminals to comply with this chip technology anyway, there’s a good possibility they might say “Hey, might as well get the NFC-compatible terminal because the world is moving in that direction.” I think that confluence of factors might work in [Apple’s] favor.GAZETTE: What’s in it for consumers and for retailers to use Apple Pay? Is convenience and security enough of a hook?GUPTA: I think those things are still question marks. For the consumer, there’s not enough of a compelling reason. It’s just taking out a card versus taking out a phone. Some people will certainly be swayed by the security issue. But if you think about what Apple is going for initially, their hope is users of Apple Pay will be much more [open] for in-app purchases or purchases within the environment of the mobile phone itself rather than at the offline retail store. And once we get used to the idea, then you might find it easier to do in other places. There’s not a compelling reason for me to use Apple Pay, other than curiosity.The only reason some of the retailers have signed up is that the association with Apple makes them seem cool, and technology leaders in some way. If I’m McDonald’s versus Burger King, and McDonald’s signs up, you feel like you’re appealing to the cool generation. Apple has that halo, and you’re leveraging that halo. But there are a lot of large retailers like Walmart staying away because they are saying “We want to control the information.” If I’m Walmart, I want to own the data because I can learn about my consumers’ habits. If I’m Starbucks, I already have the mobile app in there, so I don’t see any reason why I should link with Apple Pay. There’s been a lot of uncertainty. It’s almost like if you go back to the iPhone or iPad days. The initial notion of the iPad that I heard many people say was that “It’s just a bigger version of the iPhone. Why do I need it?” — until the apps started developing and until consumer habits changed. So it’s a chicken-and-egg problem to a certain extent. Once people start accepting it, you build up to a critical mass. But there are no guarantees, of course.GAZETTE: What might be a compelling benefit?GUPTA: For example, when Starbucks built their mobile app so that people could load it with money, it took off and did quite well. The simple reason is if I’m a regular person who goes to Starbucks and there’s a long line, I can very quickly go through that, and they’ll know exactly what I want to order, everything is credited, and I don’t have to carry my stuff around. It’s not a large population, but some people found it compelling that all of the information is there, and then Starbucks will give some discounts also as a result. Typically, discounts are the easy way for companies to give some benefit, but not the only way. It has to be something stronger than that: “I find it convenient, I find it useful, I couldn’t have done it without this,” something of that kind.GAZETTE: The idea of the “virtual wallet” has been talked about as a holy grail of sorts for quite some time, and yet most people still use cash or plastic. What’s driving Apple to jump into this market now, and what’s your sense of its potential to fundamentally change retail buying habits?GUPTA: There need to be a lot of players in this system for it to happen: The consumers have to be willing, merchants have to be willing, card companies have to be willing, and lots of players have to align. And it’s very hard for any single company to align all these guys and say “Let’s do it.” Apple seems to have a little bit more clout than most companies because of the halo effect. That’s why MasterCard is actually advertising it on its own. They’re putting the marketing dollars behind Apple Pay, not Apple. Why is MasterCard doing it? Because they want to come across as a more innovative company.The whole battle between Apple and Samsung and Google is about keeping the customer within your own ecosystem. The reason why you and I might not change from iPhone to Samsung, even though we may think Samsung is a better phone in terms of features and benefits, is that I’m linked to iTunes, I’m linked to all that kind of stuff, so it just increases the stickiness of the consumer. If I now also have Apple Pay, then there’s one less reason to switch. For them, it’s a loyalty play. They’re not getting the data. They’re not making a whole lot of money. You can only compete with Samsung and the others on the hardware so much. So it’s just another way of differentiating yourself from the other guys.GAZETTE: So there’s not a significant amount of money to be made from being the platform that people use to buy things?GUPTA: Not in the near future. Yes, with a large volume, it might become reasonable, so that’s a possibility. But my sense is that the bigger play, for the time being, is on keeping the loyalty to their devices. Samsung is already becoming a big competitor, and Apple can certainly continue innovating. But at some point in time, the differences look smaller and smaller on the device side.GAZETTE: What are the big challenges in getting customers and vendors to move away from credit cards and migrate to a mobile payment platform like Apple Pay?GUPTA: I think it’s more psychological. We’re all creatures of habit, and we’re used to doing certain things. I’m used to pulling out a credit card and swiping it, and that’s what I do, even if you tell me it’s exactly the same. In order for me to switch, there has to be a really compelling reason. PayPal, for example, works simply because we’re not used to pulling out a credit card and swiping on our desktop. We had to input the numbers; that was a different behavior. That’s why anytime there’s a change in medium, there’s a possibility of somebody else changing your behavior. I think at the retail level, adoption will take more time than, say, within the mobile phone or in app purchases, which will be the first direction that will happen.Right now, the system looks secure, but tomorrow who knows whether somebody can hack into your system. There’s always a new set of worries. What if I lose my phone? There’s nothing foolproof. So [Apple Pay] looks secure compared to what we have so far, but it looks secure because nobody’s tried to hack it so far.GAZETTE: Is there a competing product or idea on the horizon that could undercut the mobile payment model, or is this the future?GUPTA: I think mobile payment will take some time. Is there a new technology that might replace mobile payment? It doesn’t look like that right now, because I think mobile payment itself is in the early stages. So I don’t think one needs to worry about replacing mobile payments. There are a lot of challenges to begin with: Eighty-five percent of the population around the world still uses cash and checks. [Many people] haven’t even moved to cards, if you look globally. So moving to mobile will also take a decade or so. It’s not going to happen soon.This transcript has been lightly edited for clarity and length.last_img read more

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Community Standards replaces Residential Life

first_imgStudents used to cringe at the thought of having to go to the Office of Residence Life, but the new school year has brought changes to the University’s conduct system.   Members of the Office of Community Standards, which has replaced the Office of Residence Life, gathered in the LaFortune Student Center on Tuesday to discuss these adjustments to the disciplinary process. Director of community standards Ryan Willerton said these changes are only to the process a student undergoes and not to the actual policies regarding student conduct.   Willerton said the motive for the new change was to create a disciplinary system that addresses the specific needs and offenses of individual students. “We will look at every student as an individual,” Willerton said. “We want to get to the heart of the matter and try to make a process that helps a student learn and grow.” University officials conducted a comprehensive review of student opinions about the conduct system and of standards at other leading universities. Willerton said this review highlighted the problems with the Residence Life system.   “After we compiled all this information, we noticed procedural inconsistencies,” he said.  Sarah Senseman, director of constituent services for Student Government, explained how certain scenarios will play out under the new policy. She said if a student is intoxicated on campus, he or she will receive an individualized punishment. “In the old system, students would have been referred to the Office of Residence Life along with the option of 20 hours of community service or a $200 fine. Now, this [infraction] will result in a meeting with a rector, along with an outcome tailored to the specific student,” Senseman said.   Another change is that the University will no longer report first-time offenses of this level to external groups or individuals, Senseman said.   Members of the Office of Community Standards also discussed the continuation of the Peer Advocacy Program, which allows students undergoing the conduct process to meet with a peer adviser.   Erin O’Brien, vice president of the Judicial Council for Peer Advocacy, said the Peer Advocacy Program enables students to better work with the system instead of against it. She said students can consult with these peer advocates before, during or after the conduct process.   O’Brien said the Peer Advocacy Program makes the disciplinary process less stressful for students. “We want to ease anxiety that students may have about the conduct process,” she said.  Willerton said the new system is designed to create a campus community where behavior is characterized by proper respect for others. “It’s all about holistic development of our students. …The standards of our community are really based on respect,” he said. There are only two circumstances under which a disciplinary case can be appealed, Willerton said.   “Only a procedural defect or a new form of information about a case can reopen it. … One cannot file a new case based on the severity of the outcome,” Willerton said. Willerton said the new policies give rectors and resident assistants increased opportunities for mentorship and conversation with students. “The rector knows you best and can figure out an outcome that will help you learn and keep the problem from happening again,” Willerton said. Many standards of conduct and the associated levels of disciplinary referral are available at communitystandards.nd.edulast_img read more

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The scorpion myth

first_imgBy April ReeseUniversity of GeorgiaLarge frontal pinchers, six pairs of eyes, eight legs, a tailtipped with a venomous stinger — sounds like a nightmare. Butit’s really just a “harmless” scorpion.A scorpion uses its front pinchers mostly as feelers because even with a dozen eyes it can’t see very well. And the venom inits stinger, which it raises threateningly above its body, is nostronger than a typical bee’s.They’re not as dangerous as they look, said Elmer Gray, andentomologist with the University of Georgia College ofAgricultural and Environmental Sciences.”Many species of scorpions are innocuous, or nonpoisonous, and produce stings that are followed by sharp pain or a burningsensation and a lump, which usually disappears with nocomplications,” he said.At least two species, Gray said, are native to Georgia: theSouthern devil (Vejovis carolinianus) and striped (Centruroides vittatus) scorpions. The former can growto 1.5 inches long, while the latter can get a bit bigger.”These scorpions aren’t considered life-threatening, althoughsome people may have … reactions such as swelling and fever,”he said. “People who have allergic reactions to bee stings may be more likely than others to have the same reactions withscorpion stings.”Although scorpion stings in Georgia aren’t normally deadly, they still hurt. And “scorpions are aggressive and will sting ifprovoked,” he said.Treating the stingGray suggests using an ice pack and pain relievers to ease the pain of a sting.”Washing the wound lessens the chances of secondary infection,” he said. “Antihistamines may help. … Calamineproducts, such as Caladryl, or corticosteroids can also beapplied if swelling is prolonged.”If you have an unusual or prolonged reaction, he said, contact a doctor.Night travelers”Scorpions are nocturnal,” Gray said, “and hide under debris,including boards, rocks, tree bark and rubbish piles during theday. They’re attracted to areas that provide shelter, moistureand their prey — mostly insects.”Scorpions don’t usually live in packs or travel in groups, soit’s rare to become infested with them. But watch out for mothers or you might wind up with more than you bargained for.”Female scorpions produce an average of 32 young,” Gray said.”The mother produces live young, which climb onto her back andremain there for five to 15 days. The young will molt in three to six days, and the typical life span for scorpions is three tofive years.”Avoiding stingsAvoiding stings is the best protection. Gray suggests ways tolimit exposure to scorpions.”Remove all debris and vegetation that are directly adjacent to a home’s foundation,” he said. “Wear gloves when moving rocksor boards around the yard. Avoid putting your hands where youreyes can’t see. And be sure to wear shoes when walking outside atnight.”Some nonchemical tactics for long-term outdoor control include: Move trash and debris.Store firewood and lumber off the ground.Remove unnecessary rocks, bricks and blocks.Install a barrier strip of gravel around the foundation of the house.Keep vegetation trimmed around the foundation of the house.Seal any openings or crevices in outside walls.Screen and weatherstrip doors, windows and vents.Repair leaky air conditioners and other outdoor water sources. Chemical treatments may be necessary, Gray said, to quicklyreduce pest populations.”A perimeter treatment focusing on potential points of entry can reduce movement into a building,” he said. You’ll get the bestresults if you apply the treatment at dusk.(April Reese is a writer with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.)last_img read more

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Analysis shows new coal generation no longer economic in U.S.

first_imgAnalysis shows new coal generation no longer economic in U.S. FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享S&P Global Market Intelligence ($):Wind energy is America’s overall lowest-cost source of new power generation, when not considering incentives, while solar and natural gas-fired facilities are also the cheapest options across wide swaths of the country, according to new analysis from the Energy Institute at the University of Texas at Austin.“This shows why, even in coal country, nobody is building coal,” said Joshua Rhodes, a research fellow at the Energy Institute whose recent analysis yielded roughly 20% and 40% cost declines for wind and solar, respectively, compared to a 2016 Energy Institute report on the levelized cost of electricity. “With gas and renewables in the system there’s just no room for coal anywhere.”The update almost eliminated coal from the institute’s interactive online map of lowest-cost new power sources throughout the United States and broadened the footprint of wind and solar as the least-expensive technologies in the county-by-county analysis. On an unsubsidized, levelized-cost basis, wind farms in Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma and Texas are the nation’s cheapest generation sources, with the cheapest wind in those states ranging from $46.76/MWh to around $48.85/MWh, the research found.The cheapest new gas generation, according to the University of Texas’ updated data, would be combined-cycle facilities in Idaho, Washington, Montana and Oregon at $52.50/MWh to $53.61/MWh. The lowest-cost U.S. solar farms, located in New Mexico, Arizona, Texas and Colorado, ranged from $62.79/MWh to $64.36/MWh. The only places new coal generation would be the cheapest option are three remote counties of Washington state, with levelized costs around $111/MWh. The analysis does not view new nuclear power as the most cost-effective technology anywhere in the country.While the Energy Institute’s analysis appears to bode well for the future competitiveness of wind and solar as federal tax incentives phase down, experts remain split on how the real impact may play out in the marketplace. Analysts from Bloomberg NEF, IHS Markit and Navigant Consulting, for instance, recently presented wildly diverging views on future solar capacity additions as the investment tax incentive declines for businesses and zeroes out for homeowners. IHS, the most bearish of the three on solar, also foresees a plunge in wind investment post-federal tax breaks.More ($): ‘No room for coal’: Wind, solar, gas seen as cheapest U.S. power without subsidieslast_img read more

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BRO-TV: Steppin’ It Up

first_imgMeadow Run from Blue Ridge Outdoors on Vimeo.“I’ve got visual confirmation that Meadow Run is good to go,” my friend Jess told me yesterday, right as I was getting ready to gear up for a mellow run down the class III+ Lower Yough. Thanks to the morning’s torrential downpours, it looked as if “mellow” simply wasn’t in the cards.Meadow Run, a class IV+ tributary of the Lower Yough, typically runs most of the year with the exception of the summertime. It’s fun, read-and-run type boogie water with a couple stouts like Cascades and 7-Foot Falls. For me though, Meadow Run is a step up. It’s a legitimate creek, and until yesterday I had never paddled anything but big water like the New River Gorge and Gauley River, where rocks lie feet below the surface, not mere inches. Yesterday’s lap down Meadow Run proved to be not only the steepest thing I’ve ever paddled, but also one of the more technical runs I’ve done. Granted, it’s no epic class V with must-make-or-die moves, but considering it’s been a month since I was in a boat last (and a few months before that I was paddling consistently), it was the step up I needed to give my confidence a little boost.Super big thanks to Jess Hartmann for showing me down! Even though it was a little low and kinda manky in some spots, we cruised down carnage-free (minus my brief encounter with a strainer). We ended our run with a lap around the Loop at 4ft. Great day on the water with perfect weather. Loving the paddling scene in Ohiopyle!Soundtrack: Charlie Parr // True Friendslast_img read more

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Discovery Center founder added to Broome County Wall of Fame

first_imgBINGHAMTON (WBNG) — A local woman, one of the founding members of the Discovery Center, has officially been added to the Broome County Wall of Fame. Hargrave joins a prestigious list of Broome County residents on the Wall of Fame. They include Rod Serling, Cartoonist Johnny Hart, and former Discovery Center Executive Director Pokey Crocker. “I am so overwhelmed, and truly humbled to be accepting this honor. I accept it in the name of everyone who has helped with the Discovery Center and the story garden, two gems of our community,” Hargrave said. Hargrave spent more than 30 years working to build up the Discovery Center. Most notably, Hargrave was behind the creation of the Story Garden, an award-winning outdoor exhibit.center_img Local leaders, friends, and Discovery Center employees and volunteers all came to thank her for decades of selfless dedication to the community. A ceremony was held Friday afternoon at the Forum Theatre Friday afternoon honoring Nancy Hargrave. last_img read more

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