Omnibus bill to centralize permit processing, offer incentives for miners

Omnibus bill to centralize permit processing, offer incentives for miners

first_imgThe sweeping omnibus bill will introduce several fiscal incentives to boost the development of downstream mining industries including mineral smelters, coal-fired power plants and coal gasification facilities. It will allow miners that invest downstream to operate their respective concessions until reserves run dry (Article 47). Otherwise, operational periods will be capped at 40 years maximum.The bill also exempts coal miners that invest downstream from paying royalties and from complying with Indonesia’s domestic market obligation (Article 28A) policy. Prevailing regulations require such miners to pay up to 7 percent of their net profit as royalty and sell 25 percent of their product domestically at US$70 per ton. Most of the price-capped coal goes to Indonesia’s largest power producer, state-owned electricity company PLN.United Overseas Bank (UOB) economist Enrico Tanuwidjaya wrote in a note last year that the government’s downstream plan “will be substantial in the long-term” but only with “consistent legal and policy certainties” and “sustained and immediate development of the processing and downstream industries.”Read also: Ban on unrefined nickel exports positive in long run: EconomistEnvironmental watchdog Mining Advocacy Network’s (Jatam) Merah Johansyah slammed the incentives, arguing that they would prolong environmental destruction.Contrary to Jatam’s argument, Indonesian Nickel Mining Association (APNI) secretary-general Meidy Katrin told the Post on Jan. 30 that “not many miners” had the financial muscle to exploit concessions beyond 40 years.Legal certainty for mining giantsThe government will provide some long-awaited certainty for coal miners and mineral miners, whose contracts are based on the now-defunct 1967 Mining Law. Article 169A of the bill allows such miners to resume operating their respective concessions as special mining permit (IUPK) holders instead of contract of work holders, whereby “IUPKs have to pay higher royalty fees”, Indonesian Mining Institute (IMI) chairman Irwandy Arif told the Post on Feb. 17.Indonesian Coal Mining Association (APBI) executive director Hendra Sinadia previously described the legal certainty issue as “very urgent” because seven coal mining giants’ contracts are slated to expire between 2020 and 2025, the earliest of which expires in November this year. The soon-to-expire contract belongs to Jakarta-based PT Arutmin Indonesia, a subsidiary of the country’s largest coal miner by output, PT Bumi Resources.Nickel mining activities at Sorowako PT Vale Indonesia Tbk. After being transported to trucks, nickel material in the form of land is placed in a temporary shelter, then put into a factory to be processed until it gets a matte nickel of 78 percent, and is exported to Japan. (JP/Ruslan Sangadji)Centralizing mining permitsThe omnibus bill aims to streamline the issuance of mining permits by centralizing the process with the government. At the moment, regional leaders have the power to issue mining permits and create regional mining regulations, many of which contradict national-level regulations.The government will scrap Mining Law articles 48 and 67 if the omnibus bill passes into law. Article 48 allows regional leaders to issue mining permits while Article 67 authorizes regents and mayors to issue cooperative mining permits.Watchdog leaders Robert Endi Jaweng and Maryati Abdullah, who respectively head think tanks Regional Autonomy Watch (KPPOD) and Publish What You Pay (PWYP) Indonesia, described the changes as a “recentralization” scheme that harks back to the country’s authoritarian New Order era.“From an autonomy standpoint, it’s drying up the spirit of regional autonomy. It’s going in the opposite direction,” Robert said, referring to the 2004 Regional Autonomy Law, which guarantees certain powers for regional administrations.Read also: Omnibus bill allows President to scrap bylaws, weakens regional administrations “The issue is not just opening the investment tap,” said Maryati. “Will local residents have a complaint-handling mechanism?”Law lecturer Ahmad Redi, who leads the drafting of the bill’s energy-related provisions, countered the argument, saying that, in the long run, downstream industry development “will increase the products’ values, which will add to state and regional incomes”.Expanding mining territory further offshoreThe omnibus bill will allow mining activities anywhere within Indonesian seas (Article 47A) whereas the existing Mining Law limits offshore activity to 12 kilometers beyond the coast (Article 6).The relaxation was needed to extract offshore tin reserves as “we are almost out of tin reserves onshore, so like it or not, we have to enter the sea,” IMI’s Irwandy told the Post.Indonesia is the world’s second-largest tin producer after China. A quarter of the global supply of tin, used for a range of products, from electronics to eyeglasses, comes from Indonesia, according to the US Geological Survey.  Read also: Growth first, environment later. Proposed legal revision relaxes mining restrictions “What’s being discussed in the job creation bill is investment certainty, including how to boost downstream industry development,” Energy and Mineral Resources Ministry coal and mineral director general Bambang Gatot Ariyono told reporters in Jakarta last week.Indonesia wants to earn more money from its mineral wealth by having miners develop downstream industries, such as mineral smelters and coal-fired power plants. The government will enforce bans on exports of all metal ore by 2022 and coal by 2046 while at the same time promoting development by relaxing regulations and offering incentives.Downstream industry developmentcenter_img Topics : An upcoming landmark bill on job creation is expected to streamline business and boost investment for miners in Indonesia, albeit at the expense of environmental protection and regional autonomy.The bill, a draft of which was obtained by The Jakarta Post, will introduce four major changes to the 2009 Coal and Mineral Mining Law. These changes aim to centralize the issuance of mining permits, provide legal certainty for mining giants, boost downstream industry development and expand the nation’s mining territory into the open seas.The changes are very similar to those being separately worked on by the House of Representatives. last_img read more

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PREMIUMExecutive column: Infrastructure Asia chief shares investors view on RI projects

first_imgFacebook Indonesia has a huge appetite for private capital to fund its infrastructure projects, especially in President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo’s administration, which puts infrastructure as his economic policy centerpiece to boost the archipelago nation’s connectivity and economic output.The National Development Planning Agency (Bappenas) has estimated that the country will need infrastructure investment worth US$429.7 billion between 2020 and 2024 to achieve the government’s National Medium-Term Development Plan (RPJMN) targets.Infrastructure Asia (IA), a Singapore-based infrastructure financing advisory group, understands the opportunities and plights of Indonesia’s infrastructure ambition, as the institution has been working alongside the government to attract private investors.The Jakarta Post’s Farida Susanty and Mardika Parama talked … Topics : executive-column Infrastructure-Asia infrastructure-development Jokowi Seth-Tan Singapore investment Google Log in with your social account Linkedin LOG INDon’t have an account? Register here Forgot Password ?last_img read more

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Coaches Corner

first_imgI hope you can tune to WRBI  at 5:45 tonight for the final Coaches Corner of this season!  Please note the early starting time which is necessary so that the Reds’ broadcast can be heard in its entirety.  I have really enjoyed this season.  I believe we had more guests this year than we have ever had before.Coaches Corner began in the early 80’s.  I am not sure exactly how many years this makes, but I know it is over 30.  We will start again in mid-August with the fall sports season.Thank you so much for your continued support!  Hope to have all of you listening again in August.last_img read more

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Gatland stands by decision

first_img He added: “Then you realise that what comes of making a decision like that is all the peripheral stuff – not the rugby decision – because it becomes a major story for 48 hours and it becomes a debate. “That is the process I’ve gone through myself. If I go back to the UK after this and say ‘did I make the decision because I believe it’s the right decision?’ or ‘did I make the decision because it was the right political decision or sentiment?’ “I have to put hand on my heart and say it’s the right rugby decision. I would hate to think we had made calls on trying to avoid criticism or public favour or perception. “He (O’Driscoll) is not finished yet. He has been a big part of the story (2013 tour). He played in the first two Tests and he has been a part of a win and a loss. “He is obviously very, very disappointed, as any player would be, but it’s like everything, it’s a learning process. It’s kind of hard when you’ve been the number one in your position for so long, for 15 years, and first choice on every team you’ve been a part of, and on every Lions team you’ve been the first choice as well. “There have been a lot of people under him who have experienced the disappointment of Brian O’Driscoll always being selected over them. It’s just part of sport, isn’t it? “Sometimes it happens and we’ve made a really tough decision, a tough call and that’s part of it.” Press Association Warren Gatland believes he has made “the right rugby decision” in dropping Ireland midfield star Brian O’Driscoll – and effectively ending his British and Irish Lions career.center_img O’Driscoll, 34, was a shock omission when Gatland announced the team for Saturday’s Test series decider against Australia in Sydney. New Zealander Gatland, who as Ireland coach first capped O’Driscoll in 1999, has preferred Welshmen Jonathan Davies and Jamie Roberts to forge the centre pairing. While O’Driscoll’s Ireland career is set to continue next term, his four-tour Lions odyssey has reached an abrupt end. When the Lions tour New Zealand in 2017, he will be 38. Reflecting on the O’Driscoll decision, Gatland said: “It’s only hard because you are making the decision by using your head and not your heart.” last_img read more

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Lambert living his very own dream

first_img “I would have to say Steven Gerrard,” came the swift response. “He lives through all the dreams I had as a kid. Everything I wanted to do he has actually done, so I would have to say him.” Reminded of that question he recalled the answer immediately, although this time he called him ‘Stevie G’ – a sign of the friendship that has built with the England captain since getting his first cap earlier this season. “It is quite the journey,” Lambert said, smiling. “The way it has gathered momentum, it’s frightening. “Everything went our way at Southampton and each manager that came in improved me massively, especially Mauricio Pochettino. He taught me how to be a different kind of player and I think that’s helping now. “It is full credit to so many people. It’s hard to say thanks to everyone involved because there has been a lot of work gone on to make me who I am today and the player I am today. That’s mainly everyone at Southampton, from fitness to coaches to everyone.” Lambert is a rare player in the modern era that fans can empathise with, having held a normal job not so long ago and made his support for Liverpool well-known. He was at Anfield for every Champions League game during the 2005 season and got a Liver Bird tattoo on his shoulder after the famous win in Istanbul. Lambert, though, is keen not to “come across as a mad fan” and believes he can get even better at Liverpool, despite now being 32 years of age. Three years ago Rickie Lambert dreamt of swapping lives with Steven Gerrard – now he is playing alongside his idol for club and country. It has been quite the journey from the lower leagues to today, having this week joined boyhood club Liverpool before linking-up with England for the World Cup. Remarkably, Lambert was plying his trade in League One for Southampton as recently as 2011, when he was asked in an interview who he would trade places with, given the choice of anyone living or dead. “I wasn’t expecting a chance at Liverpool but I have got it,” he said. “Now that I’ve got it I will do everything to not let it go and I am more than confident that I will take the chance and I will be able to improve my game again. I’ve done that every season. “I’m going to get fitter. I’m going to do everything I can to get onto the next level now. “Even though I’m 32 I feel like a kid again. I’ve got so much enthusiasm for the game. “The fact that I’m playing under Brendan Rodgers and for Liverpool I just can’t wait. “It could have come earlier in my career – if it had I don’t think I would be performing at the level I am now. I might have missed the chance. “This is a good time because I am mentally and physically ready. If it doesn’t work out now there are no excuses. “I have done everything I can to get to this point. I wasn’t expecting a chance to play for Liverpool but now I’ve got it I’ll be trying my best to deliver.” That determined mentality was coaxed out of Lambert at Southampton, where former manager Pochettino employed some unusual methods. Pre-season is notoriously hard under the former Argentina international, who not only got his players running but also walking on hot coals “That was the easy part,” Lambert said with a laugh. “That was a relaxing afternoon. “He took us away for 18 days and it was all very specific. It wasn’t just like run to a tree and back, it was very well organised. “On the coals he got some fella in to try and give you that winning mentality. It was very interesting. “One of his methods was to walk across burning coal bare footed. It was a challenge, mind over matter. You knew nothing worse could happen to you during the season.” Press Associationlast_img read more

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City slip up

first_img Press Association City certainly missed the commanding presence of Yaya Toure, on African Nations Cup duty with Ivory Coast, and have not won a match in which he has been absent for almost exactly 12 months. While the neat passing was still there the defending champions came up against a block – both mental and physical – once they reached the opposition penalty area and could have done with the Ivorian driving through from midfield to give Everton another dimension to worry about. But the home side dug in, despite the odd scare, to end a run of four successive league defeats. City are unbeaten in 14, which includes nine wins and three draws, but with Chelsea winning against Newcastle the find themselves two points behind the outright leaders. In truth neither side were in top form but that suited Everton more than the visitors. The tone was set for the first half in the third minute when John Stones delayed his pass back to Joel Robles, forcing the goalkeeper to kick hurriedly straight to Fernandinho – but the Brazilian was equally negligent as he passed to Jesus Navas in an offside position. While Everton struggled with their decision-making, often hanging on to the ball too long despite all the talk of them wanting their play to be more direct, City were at least more incisive with their passing – although their best openings came from errors from the hosts. The Toffees have the worst record in the league for individual mistakes which have goals – 11 – and that showed no signs of lessening. Manchester City lost ground in the Barclays Premier League title race after dropping two points against a dogged Everton at Goodison Park. Phil Jagielka allowed Muhamed Besic’s pass to bounce off him straight to David Silva, whose probing and movement was an isolated example of quality, but Navas fired wide. Stevan Jovetic failed to hit the target from three separate chances but it was only Besic’s perfectly-judged last-ditch tackle which denied Silva a shooting opportunity after City counter-attacked from an Everton corner. The closest either side came to scoring was just before the break when Joe Hart came out quickly to block Romelu Lukaku’s shot and Seamus Coleman hammered the rebound against the crossbar from distance. Lukaku’s physical presence and pace, which showed signs of returning in midweek against West Ham, gave City’s centre-backs – particularly £32million summer signing Eliaquim Mangala – something to think about, however, and when Baines released him down the left his cross-shot was parried behind by Hart. Aguero replaced Jovetic in the 67th minute but his first effort was a tentative one, volleying wide from outside the area – by which time Everton had already had a goal by Jagielka ruled out for offside against Steven Naismith. Everton’s propensity to hang onto the ball too long may have been born out of a lack of confidence from recent results but Lukaku, buoyed by his goal in midweek, should have had less reason than most to dither. But dither he did on the edge of City’s penalty area and when he was dispossessed by Pablo Zabaleta a quick transfer downfield saw Fernandinho nod home Silva’s deflected shot from close range. Everyone assumed that would be that but City have shown vulnerability when ahead before – and Everton’s dogged persistance was rewarded four minutes later when Naismith got to Baines’ free-kick before Hart to glance a header into the empty net. Manuel Pellegrini’s side were far from at their best and even the return from injury of leading scorer Sergio Aguero as a second-half substitute could not get them over the line. Fernandinho put them in front in the 74th minute but Steven Naismith’s glancing header earned a deserved 1-1 draw for the hosts. last_img read more

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Neymar reveals summer talks with Manchester United

first_imgBarcelona forward Neymar has revealed he held talks about a possible move to Manchester United this summer. Press Association When asked about United’s interest, the Barca star told ESPN Brazil: “We had conversations, but there was nothing concrete. “I heard that there were offers but none were made to me.” Neymar joined Barcelona from Santos in 2013. He scored 22 league goals in Barca’s title-winning campaign last term. He wants to keep on improving at the Nou Camp this year. “I want to keep giving my all and evolve season to season,” he said. “I hope I will be on the Ballon d’Or podium this year.” center_img United executive vice-chairman Ed Woodward flew to Barcelona earlier in August. At the time it was widely believed he had flown to Catalonia to try to tie up a deal for Pedro, who eventually joined Chelsea, but it has since emerged he had launched an audacious bid to sign Neymar. last_img read more

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The constant: Dodgers’ Rick Honeycutt may be best pitching coach in baseball

first_img“I think a lot of pitching coaches can do either one or the other,” Haren said. “They’re either good at helping you try to get guys out or the majority of the old-school pitching coaches – which I would kind of consider Rick to be – old-school pitching coaches are a lot more mechanical. They want to talk to you in the bullpen. They want to talk to you about your last start – what went right? What went wrong? Were your mechanics out of whack?“He blended a lot of that with a lot of the game-plan stuff. I think the newer school type of pitching, he’s kind of adapted to that.”No season has challenged Honeycutt’s ability to adapt more than 2016.The Dodgers used 31 pitchers this season. Fifteen started at least one game. Six pitchers made their major league debuts. Rookies started a major league high 70 games and threw 424 innings in all for the Dodgers, nearly 30 percent of the staff’s total.“Yeah, it’s obviously been different when you have that many bodies to work with,” Honeycutt said with a wry smile. “I feel like my job is to be the steady ship.”One of the rookies Honeycutt steered through the rough waters of his first big league season, Ross Stripling, said the coach “had a tremendous impact” on him.“For one, his ability to scout and stuff is really incredible,” Stripling said. “He works really hard and watches more video than anyone in this locker room. If you go to him and ask him about anyone, he’s ready to tell you how to attack him. That goes for me, Julio (Urias) – from the right or left side, he’s on the ball about knowing what to do. That’s always been baffling to me. Once I pitch to them, I move on and forget about it. He seems to be able to retain it.“There’s been a bunch of things this year that he’s really helped me with. Obviously, I wouldn’t be where I am without his help. I assume that goes for me, Julio, Jose (De Leon), Kenta (Maeda).”Honeycutt had an impact on another rookie, making his job easier – first-year manager Dave Roberts.“He was a huge part of my development this year and our relationship has become a lot closer,” Roberts said. “Just his openness and willingness to help me along the way – it’s hard to really put into words what he’s meant to me.“As a person who’s been around for so long, he’s got so much knowledge and information. To empower me as the manager to make certain decisions but also to help me along the way, infuse his input – he just really gets the balance between that. With him, there’s no ego. I’ve learned a lot from him.”Honeycutt, 62, could have left for Miami along with Mattingly or taken one of the other options that presented themselves during the Dodgers’ managerial search last fall. He acknowledges spending a difficult weekend thinking through the alternatives before opting to return to the Dodgers and ride out the changes.“I really stay in my box,” he said. “My job is to adapt to whatever. I learned a long time ago – I don’t worry about the offense. I try to coordinate when guys are going to pitch and get with the defensive guys. But I stay in my little box and that is trying to make our pitchers as good as possible.” Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error “He’s the best pitching coach in baseball,” said the man considered by most to be the best pitcher in baseball, Clayton Kershaw.“He’s very prepared. He works harder than anybody, watches more video than anybody,” Kershaw said. “He’s just very good at what he does. Talking to people who have left after they had him, you take for granted what he brings when you don’t know any different. I’m sure I do that, too.”During a 13-year career with eight teams, Dan Haren worked with at least nine pitching coaches, including a one-year stop in Los Angeles, where he gives Honeycutt credit with giving him the tools to extend his career even as his velocity decreased and his arsenal diminished.“I wouldn’t want to put any other coach down, per se. But compared to other pitching coaches I think Honey puts in probably the most work of any pitching coach I ever had,” Haren said. “He’s constantly doing scouting and watching video specific to every pitcher.”Honeycutt’s greatest asset, Haren said, is his ability to blend the two aspects of the job – being both a fixer (of pitching mechanics) and a planner (of pitching attacks).center_img LOS ANGELES >> Over the past 11 seasons, the Dodgers have gone through two ownership groups, as many bankruptcies as front-office makeovers (one each), four managers, 147 pitchers … and one pitching coach.During Rick Honeycutt’s tenure, the Dodgers’ pitching staff has the lowest ERA and WHIP in the majors, the best strikeout-to-walk ratio, the most strikeouts (including an MLB record 1,510 this season) and a host of other statistical superlatives.That is probably not a coincidence.“If you look at Dodgers teams over the past 10 years and how well they have performed on the run prevention side – being around Honey the last two years, it’s not a mystery as to why,” said Dodgers president of baseball operations Andrew Friedman, who made Honeycutt the only holdover from last year’s coaching staff when Dave Roberts replaced Don Mattingly as manager.last_img read more

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Lone Survivor being played at Wellington Regent Theater this weekend

first_imgThis week at the Regent Theater: “Lone Survivor” (Movie trailer is below).When: Friday 7 and 9:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, 2 and 7 p.m.Rated: R Time: 2 hoursMovie Synopsis: LONE SURVIVOR, starring Mark Wahlberg, tells the story of four Navy SEALs on an ill-fated covert mission to neutralize a high-level Taliban operative who are ambushed by enemy forces in the Hindu Kush region of Afghanistan. Based on The New York Times bestseller, this story of heroism, courage and survival directed by Peter Berg (Friday Night Lights) also stars Taylor Kitsch, Emile Hirsch, Ben Foster and Eric Bana. (c) Universal Pictures Rotten Tomatoes rating (movie critics collective approval ratings): 74%. Audience review: 90% approval.Movies ahead at Regent Theater: Feb. 7 – Nut Job.Feb. 14 – Ride Alonglast_img read more

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New Master Builders of Iowa endowment to address skilled worker shortage

first_imgDES MOINES — An organization that represents the state’s construction industry has established a new $5 million endowment to award yearly grants to schools, businesses and charities for programs that promote jobs in the construction trades.Chad Kleppe, president and CEO of the Master Builders of Iowa, said about 75,000 people are working on construction projects in Iowa today, but the demand is growing for more skilled workers.“Our concern is that if we’re not being more pro-active from an industry perspective that matters are only going to get worse,” Kleppe said.His organization is now accepting applications online for the grants, which will be awarded in December. The money isn’t for scholarships, but for projects or programs that promote construction jobs in carpentry, electrical and mechanical skills.“Maybe exhibits at museums or exhibits at different locations that are construction based,” Kleppe said. “Our hope is that contractors will work with local schools to provide the capital infrastructure for construction equipment, shop equipment be it table saws or miter saws or things like that and couple with a contractor who will provide the expertise on how to work the equipment, provide the safety and then maybe some material suppliers to provide the in-kind support in that regard.”Governor Kim Reynolds and Chad Kleppe.The Associated General Contractors of America recently conducted a national survey and 77 percent of contractors said their number one concern was finding skilled workers.“We are seeing more people retiring and we just are not filling those positions as quickly as we necessarily need,” Kleppe said.Governor Kim Reynolds has identified Iowa workforce shortage issues as a top priority. She attended today’s announcement of what the Master Builders of Iowa are calling their Workforce Opportunities Require Knowledge and Skills or “M-B-I WORKS” project.“The more that we can implement these types of programs into our middle schools and high schools, it helps educate parents to see that these are phenomenal opportunities,” she said. “It gives our students an opportunity to test run some of these careers, find that they have a passion for it and they recognize that this is a great career opportunity for them.”The Master Builders’ plan is to support up to four projects each year. The organization’s president said one of their goals is to promote more diversity among Iowa’s construction workforce, including getting more women and minorities to consider careers in the construction trades.last_img read more

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