USAID Donates to NEMA

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

USAID Donates to NEMA

first_imgPress Release: BISPhoto Caption:  Hurricane Irma Relief Supplies arrived at Jet Aviation in Nassau, September 14, 2017 from the United States Agency for International Development/Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance (USAID/OFDA).  Pictured watching the supplies being offloaded are Deputy Permanent Secretary of the National Emergency Management Agency (NEMA), Chrystal Glinton (left) and US Embassy Charge d’Affaires, Lisa Johnson (right).(BIS Photos/Raymond A. Bethel, Sr.) Related Items: Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppcenter_img Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#Bahamas, September 15, 2017 – Nassau – The United States Agency for International Development/Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance (USAID/OFDA) made a donation to NEMA today, September 14, 2017, of $166,000 in Hurricane Irma Relief Supplies that included 300 plastic sheeting rolls, 1,000 hygiene kits, 2,400 water containers, 1,020 kitchen sets and 1,500 blankets.Representatives of USAID/OFDA along with the Deputy Permanent Secretary of the National Emergency Management Agency (NEMA) were at Jet Aviation in New Providence for the presentation around mid-day.Chrystal Glinton & Lisa JohnsonUS Embassy Charge d’Affaires, Lisa Johnson stated that a Boeing 767 full of supplies would arrive into New Providence from the Miami warehouse with provisions that would be sent to the Northern and Southern Bahamas.NEMA’s Deputy Permanent Secretary, Chrystal Glinton accepted the donation on behalf of NEMA and highlighted that the US Government has not only assisted after hurricanes Joaquin, Matthew and Irma, but also assists with ongoing local training programs to better prepare for disasters.last_img read more

Continue Reading

What to expect from Fleet Week San Diego 2018

first_imgWhat to expect from Fleet Week San Diego 2018 Posted: October 22, 2018 KUSI Newsroom October 22, 2018 KUSI Newsroom, SAN DIEGO (KUSI) – Here in San Diego, we salute our men and women in the military year round but next week, there will be a series of special events designated to help you celebrate and honor our troops during Fleet Week San Diego. Categories: Good Morning San Diego, Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img

Continue Reading

The Matrix remembered at 20 Keanu classic or cyberpunk snooze

first_img Tags Share your voice Sadly, The Matrix Reloaded and The Matrix Revolutions were pretty disappointing. They pushed the original’s philosophy to the point of pretension, the effects weighed down the action, and Neo’s rise to near-divinity made him hard to relate to. Things took an even more mediocre turn with tie-in game Enter the Matrix. The 2005 game Path of Neo was a better effort, but I just never bothered with the online multiplayer Matrix Online. However, last year I watched the one that started it all for the first time since I was a teenager and I’m pleased to report that it’s lost none of its glorious sci-fi luster. I haven’t had the strength to revisit the rest of them, and probably won’t, but the original will always be a classic. — Sean Keane (London) An amazing one-off 499_fishburneLaurence Fishburne making shades and leather coats cool. Getty Images Whoa. What I remember most about The Matrix, aside from being blown away, was my wife’s reaction. She walked out of the theater absolutely giddy, saying to anyone within earshot, “That was the best movie I’ve ever seen!” It was just such a charming, honest response. We all felt that way, but she simply couldn’t resist saying it out loud. And she doesn’t usually care for action movies. Now, the less said about the plodding, pointless sequels, the better. In my reality they don’t exist. The Matrix was an amazing one-off, a movie that holds up remarkably well 20 years later. I recently watched it with my teenage son, and of course he loved it as well. “Did they ever make any sequels?” he asked at the end. “Sorry, bud,” I replied. “They never did.” #parentingwin — Rick Broida (Detroit)  The Matrix generation The Matrix Reloaded Premiere - Black CarpetNever mind the sequels, Keanu. L. Cohen This came out in June of 1999 in the UK and I went to see it with all my friends. We were 18, we’d just finished school forever, we were off to university or off around the world, it was nearly the year 2000 — and The Matrix summed all this up for us. This sense that everything was about to change and we were going from our coddled, safe little worlds into the big adult universe. Plus we were all huge fans of John Woo and anime, and seeing those influences reflected in a huge Hollywood movie was unreal. It felt like our generation was taking over the world. — Nick Hide (New York) Existential crises I had my first real existential crisis while watching The Matrix. At 14, I’d gone to the local cinema with my dad to see an action movie that had been filmed in Sydney. Sydney! In Australia! My grandparents lived there! Instead, about a third of the way through, I began doubting my existence and wondering whether I’d always lived in the Matrix, giving in to the crushing weight of solipsism that only a nerdy teenager in the suburbs truly understands. I remember I went to the bathroom midway through and stayed in my cubicle for about 15 minutes touching the walls like a baby boomer trying acid for the first time.  I returned to the cinema, a shell of a person, and fielded questions from my confused dad, who was pretty stoked to see a cool action movie, thank you very much, and thought I was massively overreacting. He was right.  That same year I discovered reality-bending flicks Being John Malkovich and The Truman Show which, combined with having to prepare for the year eight school disco, made for a troubling time of self-reflection. I realized I’d taken the red pill (at a time when that didn’t have the connotations of being an angry men’s-right activist) and I couldn’t turn back… — Claire Reilly (Sydney) Should we walk out? Carrie Anne Moss Stars In The Matrix 1999 Warner Bros And Village Roadshow FilmThe Matrix redefined movies, drawing on anime and martial arts action. Getty Images I saw The Matrix with a group of friends back when I was in college. We had no idea what it was about; all we’d seen were a few vague trailers. After 10 minutes, we were all looking at each other wondering if we should just walk out. What was this thing? An office movie about very green lights? We decided to stick it out.  Then I saw the Bullet Time effects. I thought, “This will be the perfect movie to own on DVD. You can slow it down and even reverse the whole thing with full clarity.” DVDs were finally becoming more affordable and looking at still images on a VHS tape wasn’t great.  By the time we walked out of the theater, we were acting like grade-schoolers messing around with fake kung fu while quoting the movie. These days, there are so many different trailers for films and they’re all very easily accessible. But back then, you caught the trailer before a movie or on TV. Maybe you’d download it from Apple’s Trailer site, but that required time and hard drive space. The Matrix was great. It’s too bad they never made any sequels. — Iyaz Akhtar (New York) Landing hard   2018 New York Comic Con - Day 4Twenty years later, fans like this cosplayer at New York Comic-Con are still inspired by The Matrix. Roy Rochlin/Getty Images I don’t have a good reason why I’ve never seen the Matrix. When it came out, I was 10, and I guess I never pushed to see it in the theater. What I do remember from the time, though, was my classmates re-enacting the famous Bullet Time scene on the playground, pretending to be Neo and inevitably losing balance and landing hard on their backs. Maybe that’s why I’ve never gotten around to watching it in the 20 intervening years — so much of the Matrix ended up so widely referenced in pop culture I felt like I knew it. I’ll get to it. Eventually. — Erin Carson (Louisville) Seminal texts Believe it or not, I honestly can’t remember the first time I saw The Matrix. I’m not sure I even saw it at the movies. But I did see it many, many times after 1999, because that was the year I began a Media Studies degree — and Media Studies teachers looove The Matrix. At least three different lecturers showed us the Wachowskis’ postmodern sci-fi flick in my first year alone, all of them giddy that Neo owns a copy of seminal cultural studies text Simulacra and Simulation by Jean Baudrillard. My teachers were delighted to illustrate concepts like postmodernism and hyperreality with a movie we had actually heard of. And yes, the effects were pretty awesome. — Richard Trenholm (London)  The Phantom Menace was better Hugo Weaving In 'The Matrix'Hugo Weaving is the bad guy in The Matrix. Archive Photos/Getty Images I must have been 17 when The Matrix came out. I think I was in my first year at university. I saw it at Showcase Cinemas in Coatbridge, Scotland, with my brother and all of our friends.  It seems strange in hindsight but I was such a hard-core Star Wars nerd at that point in my life that I got really frustrated at how good The Matrix was. “This is going to steal the shine of The Phantom Menace,” I thought. And I can’t believe I am typing these strange words once formulated in my broken brain. I even remember reading a line in a review that amounted to, “George Lucas has no chance of competing with this” and screaming “NOOOOOOOOOOOOOO” into the ether like Luke Skywalker.  So I enjoyed The Matrix, like any normal person. But at the same time I resented it. It was everywhere I went — that was the worst part. People bought those stupid leather coats. Every house party had the soundtrack blaring. My brother bought the movie on DVD and watched it — no joke — over 100 times.  Then The Phantom Menace came out. I was so desperate to like it I convinced myself it wasn’t bad. It seems insane in hindsight but I told myself (and others) it was better than The Matrix.  Look, it was a weird time for me. — Mark Serrels (Sydney)  Made-up moves I’m (only slightly) ashamed to say I’ve never seen The Matrix, so all the references go right over my head. I used to do tae kwon do when I was a kid, and there was this one time I was fighting someone and a few people in my class shouted, “Do The Matrix!” and I had no idea what they meant. I just made up a bunch of moves and hoped it would slide.  It’s one of those movies on my “I should watch this” list, but we all know that’ll probably never happen. — Abrar Al-Heeti (San Francisco) Red pill or blue pill?I don’t remember when, where or how I watched The Matrix for the first time. I was 7 when it came out, so all I have is a vague memory of a scene where Morpheus offers Neo a red pill and a blue pill and references Alice in Wonderland. I’ll support anything that references Alice in Wonderland. You remember the scene: “After this, there is no turning back. You take the blue pill — the story ends, you wake up in your bed and believe whatever you want to believe. You take the red pill — you stay in Wonderland, and I show you how deep the rabbit hole goes. Remember: All I’m offering is the truth. Nothing more.” — Jennifer Bisset (Sydney)  What are your memories of The Matrix? When did you first see the movie? Was it your last VHS or your first DVD? Did you immediately get yourself a Nokia 8110 and learn kung fu? Or could you never understand what the fuss was about? Tell us in the comments or on Facebook or Twitter. Aug 31 • iPhone 11, Apple Watch 5 and more: The final rumors Comments TV and Movies reading • The Matrix remembered at 20: Keanu classic or cyberpunk snooze? Apple 16 Aug 31 • Best places to sell your used electronics in 2019 The Matrix changed things. In 1999, this cyberpunk action movie exploded into theaters heralding a new millennium, a new era for filmmaking and a time when bending over backwards and flailing your arms while making whooshing noises was the coolest thing ever. Twenty years have passed since The Matrix opened in the US on March 31, 1999. (It debuted on April 8 in Australia and on June 11 in the UK.) Computer-generated imagery (CGI) was revolutionizing special effects, video tapes were giving way to DVDs and mobile phones were fast becoming a must-have. The Matrix captured all that. It’s a movie everyone remembers — even if they haven’t seen it. Two decades on, we asked sci-fi fans among the global CNET crew to share their memories of the Wachowskis’ Oscar-winning, franchise-starting original. In your playground, college dorm or family home, was The Matrix a groundbreaking instant classic or a pretentious cyberpunk snooze? A whole new universe  Keanu Reeves ushered in a new era in the 1999 movie The Matrix. Ronald Siemoneit/Getty Images I was in Mexico City when The Matrix came out, and Trinity had me at the first frame of that kick we experienced in 360 degrees. It was my last year of high school and I was contemplating a degree in cinematography, so this movie opened my mind to a whole new visual effects universe. I remember spending long hours chatting with my friends about the camera angles and stunts and eagerly considering if we would take the blue or red pill. Morpheus’ “bring it on” hand gesture became part of our slang and I’ll never look at a spoon the same way. I have seen The Matrix several times over the years and it remains one of my favorite movies because it still touches on relevant themes, the effects hold up amazingly well after 20 years, and the costumes are as cool as ever. — Tania González (San Francisco) Bullet timing Carrie-Anne Moss In 'The Matrix'Carrie-Ann Moss answers the call. Archive Photos/Getty Images “You think that’s air you’re breathing now?” I first entered The Matrix when it was in theaters in 1999, and my unsuspecting 12-year-old mind was blown — the combination of philosophical elements and Bullet Time slo-mo effects made it stand out from every other cinematic experience I’d had. It was the first DVD I bought too, so I watched the government lobby shootout and the subway fight between Neo and Agent Smith over and over (to the point where they kinda lost their impact), in addition to getting stuck in the special features and seeing how it all came together. As the 2003 sequels grew closer, my friends and I got really caught up in the hype. The Animatrix animated short film anthology gave us a delicious helping of backstory and acted as a gateway drug for anime. See All Now playing: Watch this: Apple 1:32 Aug 31 • iPhone XR vs. iPhone 8 Plus: Which iPhone should you buy? Aug 31 • Your phone screen is gross. Here’s how to clean it 2019 movies to geek out over • The Matrix remembered 77 Photoslast_img read more

Continue Reading

Holidaymakers sufferings BNP demands Quaders removal

first_imgRuhul Kabir RizviBangladesh Nationalist Party (BNP) on Saturday demanded resignation of road transport and bridges minister Obaidul Quader for his ‘failure’ to ensure smooth journeys for holidaymakers ahead of Eid-ul-Fitr.”The sufferings the home-goers facing are indescribable. The minister [Quader] has utterly failed… we think he is mainly responsible for the public sufferings, and he should step down,” said BNP senior joint secretary general Ruhul Kabir Rizvi Ahmed.He came up with remarks at a press conference at BNP’s Naya Paltan central office.The BNP leader said people are going through immense sufferings on their way to home due to rundown highways, mismanagement, exorbitant transport fares and unabated extortion on roads.Referring to Quader’s comment that people are going home smoothly without facing any tailback, Rizvi said the minister made the remark to hide his failures.”He also mocked the sufferers with his comment. We think he’s resorting to such falsehood only to protect his cabinet membership by appeasing the prime minister.”He alleged that the government has continued repression on BNP leaders and activists by implicating them in ‘false and fabricated’ cases. “Many of our leaders and activists have long been on the run to avoid harassment and repressive acts. They can’t return their home even on the occasion Eid.”The BNP leader criticised prime minister Sheikh Hasina for repeatedly seeking vote for her party enjoying government facilities. “The prime minister again sought vote for her party yesterday [Friday]. Seeking vote for a party holding the important post of prime minister is a complete violation of the election code of conduct.”He alleged that the prime minister has been begging votes desperately as she has realised that people will not cast their votes for Bangladesh Awami League for snatching their voting rights.Rizvi Ahmed also said the AL leaders and activists have got scared realising that they will suffer a massive debacle in the next polls.last_img read more

Continue Reading

Road crashes kill 5

first_imgAt least five people were killed in separate road accidents in Noakhali and Thakurgaon districts on Sunday, reports UNB.In Noakhali, two people died while another injured in a head-on a collision between a bus and a CNG-run auto-rickshaw on Laksam-Sonaimuri road at Rampur in Sonaimuri upazila in the morning.The deceased are CNG driver Rakib, 25, son of Ruhul Amin, Mizan, 31, and his brother Belal, 39, son of Bachchu Mia of Kathalia village in the upazila.Quoting locals, Abdullah-Al Masum, additional superintendent of police in Sonaimuri-Chatkhali Circle, said the accident took place when a Noakhali-bound bus collided head-on with a CNG-run auto-rickshaw around 10:00am, leaving the trio dead on the spot and one injured.On information, police recovered the bodies and took injured Abul, 29, to Noakhali General Hospital, the official added.In Thakurgaon, two motorcyclists –Faruk and Kausar of Parpugi village in sadar upzila — died on the spot in a head-on collision between a minibus and a motorcycle at Mathurapur in upazila sarad.The accident took place when the minibus hit the motorcycle around 3:00pm leaving two motorcyclists dead on the spot and injuring one, witnesses said.Locals rushed inured Robiul of the same village to Thakurgaon Sadar Modern Hospital, said Abdul Latif Mia, officer-in-charge of Thakurgaon Sadar police station.last_img read more

Continue Reading

IndoPak series Picture to be clear by next month

first_imgHopeful of the Indo-Pak series coming through in December despite the escalation in diplomatic tensions, Pakistan Cricket Board’s senior official Najam Sethi said the situation would be clear by next month.“I am not bothered by political statements coming from India or the fuss in the media around the series. I see it happening because they are highs and lows in Indo-Pak relations all the time and the situation is still not that serious to say there will be no cricket series in December,” Sethi said. Also Read – A league of his own!“I think the situation will be much clearer in September when the prime ministers of both countries and the other officials of the foreign ministries are likely to meet on the sidelines on the UN session in New York,” he said in an interview.Sethi, who was PCB chief when the MOU was signed between the two boards to play six series between 2015 and 2022 with four of them being hosted by Pakistan, said the document was signed in an ICC meeting and it is on record that BCCI said it will not back out. Also Read – Domingo named new Bangladesh cricket coach“There are millions of dollars involved in this MOU and we stand to gain a lot financially by hosting India in December. More importantly, the Indo-Pak series is even bigger than the Ashes in cricket and we need to remain cool and not panic and get worried that the series will not be held,” Sethi added.BCCI secretary Anurag Thakur said on the Geo Super channel on Monday night that the series will not go ahead if the political tensions do not subside. “There are three months and the series can be held. The BCCI wants the series to happen but our stance is clear that you can’t have bullets and cricket together. The existing outstanding issues between the two countries have to be resolved but it is wrong to say we don’t want to play the series against Pakistan.”Seth admitted that government permission and clearance for the series was a must.“When we were to tour Bangladesh earlier this there was anti-Pakistan sentiment there and we were advised to not tour.But we convinced our government that our team should go and play and we did that without any incident. So it is also not necessary that all boards will do what the government does but yes you can’t ignore the government.”last_img read more

Continue Reading

Agashe launches 11 exclusive designers this Diwali

first_imgAgashe – A multibrand prét store has made its space in most of the Delhi shoppers’ list post its March launch. The store has already seen a lot of glam from its launch to stocking names like Dhruv Kapoor, Pallavi Mohan, HUEMN, Sid Tytler, Chola and more.This festive season – Diwali being their first season – they out did themselves yet again by launching the collection of not just a couple but 11 new designers. Sheena Agarwaal, the curator and owner behind the ingenious concept marvelled her onlookers by handpicking and showcasing collections of Nachiket Barve, ILK, Zoraya, Pooja Shroff, Roshni Chopra, Rajat Tangri, Kashmiraa, Ruceru, Poshpride, Fooljhadhi and Duet Luxury. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfThe store bedazzled with the latest works of these craft-masters from fusion-wear to chic silhouettes to gold jewellery, there was a perfect amalgamation of style and tradition to floor any fashionista this Diwali season. The launch embarked the initiation of the festive season with cheer, fullness and bright colourful spirits.Seen shopping to their hearts’ desires were many of Delhi’s beloved! Fashion blended with tradition, Agashe yet again showcased style via modern prét and Indian fusion to floor its special clientele.  Agashe is a ready-to-wear multi-brand prét store launched by Sheena Agarwal utilizing sexy silhouettes with a contemporary approach. The collection is designed for women who appreciate finely crafted garments that are both luxurious and unique. Agashe, conveniently located between Delhi and Gurgaon brings timeless garments of prét designers from different parts of India under one big roof.last_img read more

Continue Reading

This PhoneControlled Range Rover Helps You Get Out of a Jam

first_imgJune 17, 2015 Never mind those dreams of using a handheld device to steer your car from the back seat, James Bond-style — the real purpose of remote control may be to get your vehicle past a muddy trench.Jaguar Land Rover is developing smartphone control technology that lets you pilot a car (in this case, a Range Rover Sport) at very low speeds while you’re outside, helping you get past difficult terrain or tricky parking spots. You have to operate everything manually at the moment, but the hope is that this will eventually bring a level of push-button autonomy where you simply tap a button to get around some rocks or back out of your garage.That may be closer than you think. The company has a Range Rover Sport test model that can autonomously perform a 180-degree turn by using sensors to detect available space, and there’s plans for a “solo” model that could handle any situation by itself.Jaguar Land Rover isn’t fond of vehicles that are solely autonomous (that would “take away the fun of driving”), but the hope is that your future ride will let you engage a self-driving mode whenever a hands-on approach would be too much of a hassle. In that sense, phone-based commands are an important early step — you aren’t obliged to keep your hands on the steering wheel the entire time. Register Now » Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global 2 min read Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. This story originally appeared on Engadgetlast_img read more

Continue Reading