Chelsea beat Spurs in semi-final clash

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Chelsea beat Spurs in semi-final clash

first_imgEmbed from Getty Images Chelsea 4 Tottenham 2Eden Hazard and Nemanja Matic scored second-half goals as Chelsea won a pulsating FA Cup semi-final against Tottenham to secure a first final appearance in five years.Willian’s double had given the Blues the lead after an enthralling first half.Harry Kane cancelled out Willian’s superb early free-kick, but Heung-Min Son fouled Victor Moses in the box and Willian smashed home the resulting penalty.Dele Alli dragged Tottenham level after the break, but Hazard’s low shot and a thunderous first-time strike from Matic earned victory in the closing stages.Spurs, with Christian Eriksen starring, had long spells of possession on both occasions after drawing level, but failed to create many chances.And Antonio Conte’s side, who will play Arsenal or Manchester City in the final next month, earned a clinical win following the introduction of both Diego Costa and Hazard with just over 30 minutes remaining.Embed from Getty ImagesPedro and Willian were both to the fore as Chelsea made a lively start to the first period following a spine-tingling minute’s applause for Tottenham under-23 coach Ugo Ehiogu, the former England defender who this week died at the age of 44.Willian, who played in a front three alongside Pedro and the ineffective Michy Batsuyai, had already threatened by the time Nathan Ake’s tackle allowed Pedro to race through and provoke the foul that led to the opening goal.Willian curled in a glorious 20-yard free-kick, the Brazilian bending the ball into the far corner and past Hugo Lloris after Pedro had been cynically brought down by Toby Alderweireld.Batshuayi then missed a great chance to double the lead, heading tamely at goal from an N’Golo Kante cross.And Spurs, who have now only beaten Chelsea twice in 17 attempts, equalised when Kane flicked the ball into the far corner with a stooping header from Eriksen’s cross.Embed from Getty ImagesSpurs, who have now lost their past seven FA Cup semi-finals, gained in confidence having been second best before the equaliser and began to dominate possession, with Eric Dier going close with another headed chance.Willian’s cool spot-kick restored the Chelsea half-time lead, only for Alli to make it 2-2 with an exquisite first-time finish from Christian Eriksen’s cross.But the introduction of Hazard, Costa and Cesc Fabregas breathed new life into Chelsea.Hazard, who ended Tottenham’s title hopes with the equaliser in a 2-2 draw last season, crashed the ball home after Spurs failed to clear a Fabregas corner to put the Blues 3-2 up.And Matic smashed in an unstoppable 25-yard first-time effort from a Hazard pass to make it 4-2 soon after.Chelsea: Courtois; Azpilicueta, Luiz, Ake; Moses, Kante, Matic, Alonso; Willian [Hazard 61], Batshuayi [Costa 61], Pedro [Fabregas 74].Subs not used: Begovic, Zouma, Terry, Chalobah.   Ads by Revcontent Trending Articles Urologists: Men, Forget the Blue Pill! This “Destroys” ED x ‘Genius Pill’ Used By Rich Americans Now Available In Netherlands! x What She Did to Lose Weight Stuns Doctors: Do This Daily Before Bed! x One Cup of This (Before Bed) Burns Belly Fat Like Crazy! x Men, You Don’t Need the Blue Pill if You Do This x Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch) x Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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Neotel goes prepaid with Blue Label

first_imgJohannesburg-based Blue Label Telecoms is a market leader in the distribution of prepaid products and services to unbanked and under-banked consumers in emerging and developing economies across the globe. Blue Label joint CEO Brett Levy pointed out that more than 80% of the South African population purchased airtime on a prepaid basis. “More so, as our customer base increases we want to ensure that they have easy access to our products and services on a national basis and with this new partnership we are convinced that there will be a strong uptake from the customers using our services,” said Pandey. South African telecoms operator Neotel has appointed Blue Label Telecoms as its e-voucher vendor partner. He explained that with over 130 000 points of presence in South Africa, Blue Label was a leading company in voucher services and had a proven, viable solution that met Neotel’s needs. “Blue Label Telecoms has over ten years experience in this growing space and has built long-term partnerships with our distribution network to ensure that prepaid products and services are conveniently available for our client’s customers,” he said. “We are excited to be working with Neotel to extend their reach into the market.” To date, Neotel has entered into strategic partnerships in place with Altech Autopage Cellular, Postnet South Africa, Samsung and Nashua, while also opening retail stores in Johannesburg, Pretoria, Durban and Cape Town. 28 July 2010 “Neotel will soon be launching prepaid services to the market and we required a partner that had a wide operational footprint, and with Blue Label Telecoms we have gained that reach into their extensive distribution network, including large chain stores, independent retailers and petroleum forecourts,” Neotel CEO Ajay Pandey said in a statement this week. SAinfo reporterWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

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Providing Fresh Air in Our Home

first_imgOne of the features in our new house that I’m most excited about barely raises an eyebrow with some of our visitors: the ventilation system. I believe we have the highest-efficiency heat-recovery ventilator (HRV) on the market — or at least it’s right up there near the top.I’ll describe this Zehnder HRV and its impressive specifications and features — but not until next week. This week I’ll provide a little background on ventilation. Ventilation optionsVentilation can take many different forms. Very generally, systems can be categorized into about a half-dozen generic types:No ventilation. This is almost certainly the most common option in American homes. There is no mechanical system to remove stale indoor air (and moisture) or bring in fresh outside air. In the distant past, when buildings weren’t insulated, this strategy worked reasonably well — relying on the natural leakiness of the house.It’s worth noting, though, that even a leaky house doesn’t ensure good ventilation. For this strategy to work there has to be either a breeze outside or a significant difference in temperature between outdoor and indoors. Either of these conditions creates a pressure difference between indoors and out, driving that ventilation. On calm days in the spring and summer, there might be very little air exchange even in a really leaky house.Natural ventilation. In this rather uncommon strategy, specific design features are incorporated to bring in fresh air and get rid of stale air. One approach is to create a solar chimney in which air is heated by the sun, becomes more buoyant, and rises up and out through vents near the top of the building; this lowers the pressure in the house, which draws fresh air in through specially placed inlet ports. The rest of this blog will focus on mechanical ventilation.Exhaust-only mechanical ventilation. This is a relatively common strategy in which small exhaust fans, usually in bathrooms, operate either continuously or intermittently to exhaust stale air and moisture generated in those rooms. This strategy creates a modest negative pressure in the house, and that pulls in fresh air either through cracks and other air-leakage sites or through strategically placed intentional make-up air inlets. An advantage of this strategy is simplicity and low cost. A disadvantage is that the negative pressure can pull in radon and other soil gases that we don’t want in houses.Supply-only ventilation. As the name implies, a fan brings in fresh air, and stale air escapes through cracks and air-leakage sites in the house. The air supply may be delivered to one location, dispersed through ducts, or supplied to the ducted distribution system of a forced-air heating system for dispersal. A supply-only ventilation system pressurizes a house, which can be a good thing in keeping radon and other contaminants from entering the house, but it risks forcing moisture-laden air into wall and ceiling cavities where condensation and moisture problems can occur.Balanced ventilation. Much better ventilation is provided through a balanced system in which separate fans drive both inlet and exhaust airflow. This allows us to control where the fresh air comes from, where that fresh air is delivered, and from where exhaust air is drawn. Balanced ventilation systems can be either point-source or ducted. With ducted systems, it makes sense to deliver fresh air to spaces that are most lived in (living room, bedrooms, etc.) and exhaust indoor air from places where moisture or pollutants are generated (bathrooms, kitchen, hobby room).Balanced ventilation with heat recovery. If there are separate fans to introduce fresh air and exhaust indoor air, it makes a lot of sense to locate these fans together and include an air-to-air heat exchanger so that the outgoing house air will precondition the incoming outdoor air. This air-to-air heat exchanger — more commonly referred to today as a heat-recovery ventilator or HRV — is the way to go in colder climates. A slightly different version, known as an energy-recovery ventilator (ERV), is similar but transfers moisture as well as heat from one airstream to the other, keeping more of the desirable humidity in the house in the winter and reducing the amount of humidity introduced from outdoors in the summer. Alex is founder of BuildingGreen, Inc. and executive editor of Environmental Building News. In 2012 he founded the Resilient Design Institute. To keep up with Alex’s latest articles and musings, you can sign up for his Twitter feed. RELATED ARTICLES Designing a Good Ventilation System GBA Encyclopedia: Ventilation ChoicesAre HRVs Cost-Effective?HRV or ERV?A New Way to Duct HRVsVentilation Rates and Human HealthHow Much Fresh Air Does Your Home Need? Joseph Lstiburek: Just Right and Airtightcenter_img Tight homes need mechanical ventilationI’ll focus more on HRVs in next week’s blog, especially our new high-efficiency Zehnder system. Following that I’ll address why commissioning an HRV is so important and how that’s done — or at least how it was done with our system.I’m a firm believer that all homes should have mechanical ventilation. With better-insulated, tighter homes, that ventilation is all the more important. But even in a very leaky house, one can’t count on bringing in much fresh air or calm days in the spring and fall when there isn’t a pressure differential across the building envelope.If budgets allow, going with balanced ventilation is strongly recommended, and if you’re doing that in a relatively cold climate, like ours, then providing heat recovery is a no-brainer. Mechanical ventilation always takes energy; with heat recovery the energy penalty of fresh air is minimized. Why ventilate?For centuries homes weren’t ventilated, and they did all right, didn’t they? Why do we need to go to all this effort (and often considerable expense) to ventilate houses today?There are several reasons that ventilation is more important today than it was long ago. Most importantly, houses 100 years ago were really leaky. Usually they didn’t have insulation in the walls, so fresh air could pretty easily enter through all the gaps, cracks, and holes in the building envelope.Also, the building materials used 100 years ago were mostly natural products that didn’t result in significant offgassing of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), formaldehyde, flame retardants, and other chemicals that are so prevalent in today’s building materials, furnishings, and belongings.last_img read more

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