Landowner Groups Encouraged By Eminent Domain Reform Bills

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Landowner Groups Encouraged By Eminent Domain Reform Bills

first_img X Share 00:00 /01:08 Travis Bubenik/Houston Public MediaPrivate property rights advocates want to see further reform of eminent domain laws in Texas.In Texas, pipelines and highways can often be built on your property whether you like it or not. But a statewide group wants farmers, ranchers and other landowners to have a bigger seat at the negotiating table when that happens. Now, there’s a new push in the state senate to reform “eminent domain” laws.These laws are based on the idea that some projects are in the public interest and deserve some leeway. But as the state grows, and pipelines move into new areas, that power has become more controversial.“You have a lot of landowners who have never experienced this before,” says Jason Skaggs with the Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association, part of a broader “Texans for Property Rights” group.The group is praising three bills filed by Brenham Republican Lois Kolkhorst. The measures would make companies be more specific about pipeline plans. The bills would also set up new rules for how landowners are paid as these projects roll through.“Landowners really want a fair compensation,” Skaggs says. “They want a fair process, they don’t want to be intimidated.”Industry attorney James Mann says the measures would only burden companies who are trying to build infrastructure the state needs.“I’ve seen pipeline projects come to a dead halt because of litigation over things much less serious than some of the provisions we’re seeing,” he says. Mann feels the industry’s done enough to accommodate reforms in recent years, and he says it’s likely these bills will see opposition. Listen To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code:last_img read more

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Mystery over apparent dearth of lithium 7 in universe deepens

first_img © 2012 Phys.org (Phys.org)—Researchers studying the cosmos have been stumped by an observation first made by Monique and François Spite of the Paris Observatory some thirty years ago; they noted that in studying the halos of older stars, that there should be more lithium 7 than there appeared to be in the universe. Since that time many studies have been conducted in trying to explain this apparent anomaly, but thus far no one has been able to come up with a reasonable explanation. And now, new research has deepened the mystery further by finding that the amount of lithium 7 in the path between us and a very young star aligns with would have been expected shortly after the Big Bang, but doesn’t take into account the creation of new amounts since that time. In their paper published in the journal Nature, Christopher Howk and colleagues suggest the discrepancy is troubling because it can’t be explained with normal astrophysics models. Journal information: Nature This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. New ideas add further mystery to why there is less lithium-7 in the universe than expected Estimates of the lithium abundance in the SMC interstellar medium and in other environments. Credit: Nature, 489, 121–123.center_img More information: Observation of interstellar lithium in the low-metallicity Small Magellanic Cloud, Nature, 489, 121–123 (06 September 2012) doi:10.1038/nature11407AbstractThe primordial abundances of light elements produced in the standard theory of Big Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) depend only on the cosmic ratio of baryons to photons, a quantity inferred from observations of the microwave background. The predicted primordial 7Li abundance is four times that measured in the atmospheres of Galactic halo stars. This discrepancy could be caused by modification of surface lithium abundances during the stars’ lifetimes or by physics beyond the Standard Model that affects early nucleosynthesis. The lithium abundance of low-metallicity gas provides an alternative constraint on the primordial abundance and cosmic evolution of lithium that is not susceptible to the in situ modifications that may affect stellar atmospheres. Here we report observations of interstellar 7Li in the low-metallicity gas of the Small Magellanic Cloud, a nearby galaxy with a quarter the Sun’s metallicity. The present-day 7Li abundance of the Small Magellanic Cloud is nearly equal to the BBN predictions, severely constraining the amount of possible subsequent enrichment of the gas by stellar and cosmic-ray nucleosynthesis. Our measurements can be reconciled with standard BBN with an extremely fine-tuned depletion of stellar Li with metallicity. They are also consistent with non-standard BBN.Press release What’s really bothering all the scientists working on the lithium problem is the fact that it’s the only element that doesn’t fit with models of how things should have come to exist right after the Big Bang. All known elements occur in amounts predicted, except for lithium 7; there’s just a third as much as theorists think there should be. In trying to understand why, researchers have looked at old stars that surround the Milky Way galaxy, low mass bosons called axions, and more recently binary stars that are believed to harbor black holes. Unfortunately, such studies have only made the problem worse by suggesting that even more lithium 7 ought to be hanging around somewhere than was predicted earlier.In this new research the team looked at one single huge young star in the Small Magellanic Cloud, or more precisely, at the spectrum measured of gas and dust through which light must travel to get from there to here, and found that the amount of lithium 7 is consistent with theories that suggest how much of the element there should have been shortly after the Big Bang, which is unsettling because scientists know that more of it should have been created between then and now. Thus, these new results only add to the mystery of where all the rest of it is, or worse, why it wasn’t created in the first place as models suggest. Citation: Mystery over apparent dearth of lithium 7 in universe deepens (2012, September 6) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-09-mystery-apparent-dearth-lithium-universe.html Explore furtherlast_img read more

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