Sanja Sudar, Kurija Janković: The hotel is not the sole reason for the arrival of the guest, but it is the destination where it is located

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Sanja Sudar, Kurija Janković: The hotel is not the sole reason for the arrival of the guest, but it is the destination where it is located

first_imgHotel Kurija Janković from Virovitica, a heritage hotel or a four-star heritage hotel, received great recognition, the most important of its guests who are the best and most relevant critics. It is the first guest recognition from the Booking.com Guest Review Awards 2017 with a high score of 9.2, and recently the hotel was also included in Fodor’s Travel Guidebook, a publication of the world’s largest publisher of travel guides.”In July last year, on the recommendation of the travel agency Boho Travel Art, the Janković Curia was visited by Andrea MacDonald, a tourist journalist of Fodor’s Travel, who collected information on tourist attractions in Slavonia for the new edition of “Croatia 2018 Guidebook”. On that occasion, the entire offer of the Janković Curia was presented to her, its history and plans for the future were told, and in cooperation with Nippy Adventures, a bike tour along the Drava River was made on electric bicycles, which are usually offered by the hotel, thus creating a complete cycling experience.”Points out Sanja Sudar, head of the Janković Curia.Thus, the heritage hotel will be on the list of recommended accommodation facilities in this part of Croatia, while the cycling tourist offer is rated as excellent. As Fodor’s is the world’s largest publisher of tourist guides in English, whose observations and recommendations have significantly influenced the choice of vacation spot for more than 75 million of its readers for 20 years, this is more than a great advertisement, and the recommendation will be visible in print. an edition of the guide that will be available for purchase on Amazon, as well as on Fodor’s website. “The great news that has arrived at the Janković Curia these days, about the inclusion in Fodor’s guide as a recommended accommodation facility in this part of Croatia, certainly means a lot to us. That recommendation will be visible in the print edition of the guide, which will be available for purchase on Amazon, as well as on Fodor’s website. Whether the hotel will be included in the offer depended exclusively on the hotel reviews and the actual experience of the journalist. So, not knowing if we would eventually find ourselves in the company of the elect, we waited impatiently for this good news. The exceptional quality of accommodation in the historical heritage, the combination of our electric bicycles and the interestingly designed Drava route of the cycling guide rounded off the visit of Fodor’s team and showed that we definitely deserve our place on the tourist map of Croatia and the world.”Sudar points out and adds that they offer bed and breakfast, and that they refer guests to local restaurants that work with local ingredients and indigenous dishes.The magic formula for success is very simple. Let’s be what we are, sell an authentic and home-made story and look at the guests not as a number, but as people who came on vacation and met and experienced something new. “The way we welcomed the representative of the Fodor guide is identical to the way we usually greet our guests. We wanted the experience of staying in our area to be authentic, without pushing into the offer of some things that are not natural and characteristic for us. The enthusiasm was first aroused by the Curia as such – a beautiful, elegantly restored 19th-century building that simply radiates uniqueness. ” says Sudar and adds that such objects also bring with them interesting historical sketches that everyone from the Janković Curia team is happy to pass on to visitors.Sanja Sudar: We are also aware that the hotel is not the sole reason for the arrival of the guest, but it is the destination where it is located Hotel Kurija Janković has 18 comfortable double rooms, and guests have at their disposal a coffee bar, restaurant, meeting room, conference hall, souvenir shop and bicycles. The hotel is located at the place where Slavonia embraces Podravina and in the environment of the UNESCO Transboundary Biosphere Reserve Mura-Drava-Danube. Visitors to the hotel are half domestic and half foreign guests, mostly from Austria, Germany, Hungary, Slovakia and the Czech Republic, and last year there was a growth of over 200% in overnight stays. I would like to emphasize that the main focus must be on authenticity, destination as well as the focus on local and traditional gastronomy. It is in this field that they score at the Kurija Janković Hotel. Also, most hoteliers have no way of understanding that the motive for coming is not accommodation, but a quality, diverse and authentic experience of the destination.The atmosphere in Kurija Janković is always homely and pleasant, we always try to respond to every request of the guest with a smile and provide him with a special experience in which he will feel appreciated and welcome, not just as one client in a row, said Sanja Sudar. the word “domestic” runs through our entire business and guests are increasingly recognizing it. “Homemade, homemade, homemade! The hotel serves a traditional Slavonian-Podravina breakfast prepared from local ingredients, and the offer of the coffee bar consists of local wines, liqueurs, teas, natural juices, craft beers, and in local restaurants freshly caught Drava fish is prepared in the traditional local way. We believe that the destination needs to be experienced with all your senses, and the inclusion of local producers in the hotel offer was a completely logical and correct choice for us. We are also aware that the hotel is not the sole reason for the arrival of the guest, but it is the destination in which it is located. We are proud of the untouched nature and richness of flora and fauna of the continental part of Croatia, which tells its own amazing story. Guests of our hotel regularly use bicycles as well as electric ones that we offer”Sudar points out.The message and business philosophy is clear.By the way, the hotel opened its doors to its first guests in 2016, when it got a whole new glow from the old ruins. In the first year of operation, they had an average of 66 nights per month, while last year there was an increase of 220% and an average of 212 nights per month, which is proof of how personalized approach and attitude towards guests is highly valued and respected. That should be imperative. “One of the problems of this part of Croatia is certainly the lack of organized tourism in the form of agency tourist packages, so all the results achieved are individual efforts by hotels and our local caterers and family farms with which we strive to create an attractive tourist product. We hope that the entire tourist offer of the continental part of Croatia will be more visible because we have something to offer with its content and quality. Cycling is certainly one of the directions we have chosen because Virovitica-Podravina County, which through EU projects has marked five hundred kilometers of bike trails in our hilly-plain area, has given us a good foundation for the development of this type of tourism. The experience is what the guest brings home, and we strive to make it truly memorable and special”Says Sudar and adds at the end that they are happy to wait for every occasional traveler and will be happy to create a personalized experience for each guest.Yes, they work and fight and live tourism 0/24. If you need advice on how to extend the tourist season, ask our tourist heroes from the continent, who work all year round. If I can do it on the continent, then why not at sea.Small family and boutique hotels must be our main base, at least in my opinion, because they employ local people, use local food, have a more intimate and homely atmosphere, and they are the ambassadors of our tourism and work all year round. Of course, we also need large hotels, but certainly as a development concept based on small family hotels, it is sustainable and more efficient. It is private renters with six or more rooms who should be encouraged to take this path, to become small family hotels with a story.In the tourism development strategy, we need 1.000 small family resorts, not 1.000 tourist resorts.&amp;lt;/p&amp;gt;&lt;br /&gt;<br />
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First Frame Lowered into Place for the New Antarctic Wharf

first_imgA major milestone has been reached on the new Antarctic wharf project at Rothera Research Station.Following two months of deconstructing the old Biscoe wharf, the first frame of the new 74-meter long structure has been lowered into place.Over the weekend, divers completed the final part of the wharf deconstruction along the sea bed, making way for the first 55–tonne frame to be installed on Tuesday.Lowered carefully into position onto temporary guides from a 300-tonne crane, the operation took 12 hours. In relatively warm and sunny conditions, the team worked throughout the evening fine-tuning the frame setting to within 40mm tolerance.This precision engineering was critical to ensuring the alignment for the new wharf, which will provide safe berthing and efficient operations for the new RRS Sir David Attenborough.In total 20 frames will make up the wharf’s skeleton, with seven due for installation during this season by Construction Partner BAM and Technical Advisor Ramboll.BAM Project Engineer Ian Wenkenbach said: “Two years of planning came to bear fruit on Tuesday, with the successful installation of the critical first frame. The full-scale trial assembly and lift undertaken back in September in the UK ensured that the operation here in Antarctica went according to plan.”Importance of the new Antarctic WharfThe new wharf at the Rothera Research station will provide safe berthing and efficient operations for the new 129-meter long Polar Research Vessel, the RRS Sir David Attenborough.The commissioning of the RRS Sir David Attenborough is part of a major government polar infrastructure investment program designed to keep Britain at the forefront of world-leading research in Antarctica and the Arctic.This £200m commitment represents the UK government’s largest investment in polar science since the 1980s. It includes a raft of modernization across the BAS estate.Supporting BAS is a Technical Advisor team led by Ramboll, which includes Turner & Townsend and NORR Architects, working alongside BAS’s construction partners BAM.last_img read more

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Trust at Stake

first_imgby, Eilon Caspi, ChangingAging GuestbloggerTweet7Share38Share13Email58 SharesWoodcarver: Eilon Caspi Photographer: Jason R. CampbellTruth is like a vast tree, which yields more and more fruit, the more you nurture it. The deeper the search in the mine of truth the richer the discovery of the gems buried there, in the shape of openings for an ever greater variety of service – GandhiI strongly support efforts to cure Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia. These scientific breakthroughs would bring tremendous relief and hope to millions of people currently living with these conditions and many more who will develop them in the future. It is estimated that 5.5 million Americans of all ages were living with Alzheimer’s disease in 2017. By 2050, the number of people age 65 and older with the disease may nearly triple to a projected 13.8 million, “barring the development of medical breakthroughs to prevent or cure Alzheimer’s disease” (2017 Alzheimer’s Disease Facts & Figures, Alzheimer’s Association). Such sorely needed breakthroughs would also bring great relief to millions of family members and friends who currently support and care for these individuals. However, there is an increasing recognition among a growing number of experts that these efforts must be done in a more responsible, balanced, transparent, accountable, and ethical way than has generally been done to date. It is imperative to be truthful with the public about the current actual evidence-based likelihood for cure of Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia. The public has the right to know. Giving realistic hope for cure is needed if we are fully committed to “Authentic Partnership” with this population (a term coined by Professor Sherry L. Dupius, Murray Alzheimer’s Research and Education Program, University of Waterloo, Canada).Frequent but unrealistic promises for cure of Alzheimer’s disease as “just around the corner” have been a commonplace and “business as usual” in the past several decades. Numerous thought leaders have recently expressed their deep concern about these misleading and unethical claims; some of whom have stated that such promises are a strategy for massive fund raising efforts aimed predominantly at curing the disease. For example, Professor Peter Whitehouse, a prominent geriatric neurologist, cognitive neuroscientist, and global bioethicist, who has seen thousands of people struggling with brain aging throughout his career, makes a strong case as to why he believes “We are giving people false hope.” He explains,“False hope is a better fund raiser than realistic expectations. Organizations that comprise the Alzheimer’s empire thrive because the Alzheimer’s myth is a cash cow that keeps on giving. Many of us in the field worry that the pursuit of truth has been eclipsed by the pursuit of raising funds.”In accordance, Dr. Paul Raia, a national expert who worked for nearly 30 years in various leadership positions at one of the founding chapters of the Alzheimer’s Association wrote me recently, “There is a deliberate attempt to mislead the public and a misdirection of funds. There will not be any single cure, because there are many different diseases that combine to cause many forms of dementia. Prevention could significantly reduce the number of dementia cases…” My recent article – Trust at Stake: Is the “Dual Mission” of the U.S. Alzheimer’s Association Out of Balance? – provides a comprehensive description of these concerns, the growing recognition of the “unbounded complexity” of Alzheimer’s disease, the major challenges involved in curing it (not to mention dozens of other forms of dementia…) as well as the far-reaching negative consequences these unrealistic claims have on the daily lives, support, and care provided to millions of people living with dementia and the support and education sorely needed by their family and paid care partners. Shortly after my article was published on August 25, 2017 (only the 150-word abstract of the article was publicly available at that point), I was told by a colleague of mine, a co-chair of a leading and innovative national dementia-friendly education and advocacy organization (i.e. “the organization”) that the National Office of the U.S. Alzheimer’s Association contacted two of the organization’s board members and at least two of the organization’s partners about their concerns and “thinly veiled threats” to withhold funding to their organizations and companies if “the organization” would publish information about my article in its e-News (which it has already done at that point; the e-News stated that I raised “a crucial question” in my article). I was told that these board members and partners “voiced their concern about upsetting the Alzheimer’s Association.” In the words of my colleague at the organization, “The bullying reach of the Alzheimer’s Association hit “the organization.”A few days later, a colleague of mine who is living with dementia and a leading national advocate for this population, wrote me that the Alzheimer’s Association is “squashing the article wherever they see it.” He added that it has become toxic and people have removed it from their websites and social media due to pressure by the Alzheimer’s Association. He encouraged me to make the full-text version of the article publicly available as, in his words, “this will have a bigger impact.” Other colleagues told me that many people want to read the full-text article but are unable to do so because they do not have subscription to a university library database. Thanks to a generous donation made by an individual who for years was caring for a parent living with dementia (the donor asked to remain anonymous), the full-text article is now publicly available online free of charge. (Citation: Caspi, E. (2017). Trust at stake: Is the “dual mission” of the U.S. Alzheimer’s Association out of balance? Dementia: The International Journal of Social Research and Practice. Published Online Ahead of Print.)What makes it so that the predominant biomedical research focus on cure and the frequent but unrealistic promises for cure as being “just around the corner” represent one of the biggest problems in a field dedicated to serving, supporting, and caring for this population? For several decades, the gross imbalance has been systematically diverting precious societal resources – many billions of public (tax payers) and private donor dollars away from psychosocial research aimed at improving the safety, quality of care, support, and quality of life of people with dementia as well as from prevention of abuse and neglect of these individuals in the community and long-term care homes. As importantly, it diverted funding away from evidence-based person-directed care and timely support and education that should be provided to these underserved individuals and their family care partners. After reading my article, Dr. Paul Raia wrote me:“Too much attention is given to the quest for the ‘magic pill,’ too little attention is being given to prevention through healthy lifestyle, too little money and research is put into treating symptoms of those living with dementia with behavioral interventions, too little money is put into supporting families as caregivers, and too little effort is put into regulating services like adult day heath [centers], assisted living and dementia care in nursing homes. In all of this, the Alzheimer’s Association has focused on the wrong targets and exploited the general public lack of information.” Another colleague of mine who lives with dementia and is an advocate for this population wrote me, “It is useless to direct our energies to the Alzheimer’s Association…they are just too powerful with their funding and ability to kill off anyone who dares to question them.” A couple of weeks ago, when I asked my colleagues at “the organization” if they would be willing to share the link to the full-text version of my article within the organization’s network, I was told that the board of the organization expressed their wish that “the organization” would not “appear to be agitating the Alzheimer’s Association” (the comment was made in reference to the earlier dissemination of a link to the abstract of my article in the organization’s e-News) and therefore it would not be possible.  Which made me wonder…What about the dozens of millions of people living with dementia and their family members who are very frustrated, upset, and “agitated” by the fact that for decades sorely needed (including life saving) support services and educational programs are not provided to them because precious societal resources and funding (many billions of $) have been diverted away from these services and programs in the excessive quest to cure Alzheimer’s disease?  Interestingly, one Webster dictionary definition of the word “Agitate” is: “To discuss earnestly.” Unfortunately, the fear of certain organizations and individuals to publicly “say it as it is” and “speak truth to power” (the National Alzheimer’s Association has been described to me by my colleagues as an 800-pound gorilla) serves as a persistent barrier for our society’s ability to have a sincere and open national discussion about the most effective ways to serve and support people living with Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia and optimize their psychological well-being and brain health. It is worth noting that shortly after the publication of my article, a co-chair of “the organization” wrote me “I thought the article was very compelling and very realistic.” Another co-chair wrote me: “Kudos for such a terrific article!!” “Excellent job” and “This is an important body of work.” The person added that the organization “110% supports you.” Later on the co-chair wrote me, “Few people are willing to speak truth to power.” The day we see the truth and cease to speak is the day we begin to die – Martin Luther King Jr. The National Alzheimer’s Association knows the truth. I wrote the article to the general public, people in earlier stages of dementia and their family members, policy makers, federal funding agencies (such as National Institute on Aging), foundations, and private donors in hopes that they will become more informed when they develop their strategic plans and funding priorities. A notable example is Bill Gates’ recent donation of 50 million dollars from his personal money towards efforts to cure the disease: Bill Gates’ Newest Mission: Curing Alzheimer’s Disease, CNN, November 14, 2017.  In addition, numerous celebrities are systematically identified and recruited by the National Alzheimer’s Association often for the cause of curing Alzheimer’s disease. For example, the National Alzheimer’s Association Annual Report (Fiscal Year 2016; pages 37-40) lists no less than 146 “Celebrity Champions,” who, according to the association, “enthusiastically embrace our vision of a world without Alzheimer’s disease.” To what extent these individuals are fully informed when they decide how to contribute their time, resources, wealth, and influence to addressing Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia? The biomedicalization of Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia frequently perpetuates the misconceptions and harmful stigma commonly associated with living with these conditions. According to the Alzheimer’s Association, “stigma is the use of negative labels to identify a person with a disability or illness. Stigma around Alzheimer’s disease exists, in part, due to lack of public awareness and understanding of the disease.” The association adds, “facing stigma is often a primary concern of people living with Alzheimer’s and their care partners.” True. Is it possible that the National Alzheimer’s Association, an organization claiming to “drive the national conversation about Alzheimer’s,” intentionally stigmatize the very population it serves? Does it suffer from Dementism? Dr. Stephen Post, bioethicist and author of the book The Moral Challenge of Alzheimer’s Disease and recipient of the Pioneer Medal for Outstanding Leadership in Health Care, wrote in the year 2000,   “The convenient propensity to think more highly of some lives than others must be restrained by some principle of equal human worth.” He adds, “The term Ageism [i.e., “discrimination based on age”] does not capture the specificity of resentment against the deeply forgetful. We therefore need a new term, and I here suggest ‘dementism.’”In her ChangingAging post called Confronting Dementism (January 21, 2015), Lynn Casteel Harper, M.Div. a writer, minister, and chaplain, writes about barriers for a dementia-inclusive world:“Bioethicist Stephen Post uses the term ‘dementsim’ to describe the prejudice against the deeply forgetful. Dementism reflects a deep cultural sickness that combines a bias against old age (agesim) with a bias against impaired cognition (cognitivism). The result is a highly pessimistic and reductionist attitude toward persons with dementia. They are their disease; they are shells, husks, the “living dead”; they can have no quality of life. The disease is “the death that leaves the body behind,” which feeds the notion that dementia creates a category of sub-humans, not unlike zombies.”Is it possible that the National Alzheimer’s Association knowingly stigmatize people living with dementia as a means to control the national conversation about Alzheimer’s disease and serve its mission to “conquer” the disease? Sounds unlikely…right? Especially given the Alzheimer’s Association’s helpful webpage called Overcoming Stigma and 2-minute video called Alzheimer’s Stigma 2013 (informed by the great work of the Alzheimer’s Association Early-Stage Advisory Group).This possibility was recognized over half a century ago by Erving Gofffman, professor of sociology and author of the book Stigma: Notes on the Management of Spoiled Identity (1963). He stated, “Stigmatization can serve as a means for formal social control.”Christine Bryden, an author and advocate who is living with dementia, observed that using negative images that are stigmatizing to people living with dementia serve a fund raising purpose. She says, “the stereotype tugs at the heartstrings and loosens the purse strings.”  A couple of recent examples that make one wonder whether this might be the case include the biased, deterministic, tragedy-oriented narrative, fear-fueling, stigmatizing, and disempowering PBS film Alzheimer’s: Every Minute Counts (January 25, 2017) (that, not surprisingly, concludes with a plug for medical research funding) and the Alzheimer’s Association’s recent stigmatizing and damaging campaign called Pure Imagination Project. For a balanced, informed, and responsible analysis of this film and campaign, see ChangingAging post Alzheimer’s: Every Person Counts: A Call for Action (January 23, 2017) and Anne Basting’s recent ChangingAging post called Stealing Hope (December 29, 2017).Another film is called Monster in the Mind: The Convenient Un-Truth about Alzheimer’s Disease, which was screened on July 26 2016 at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Canada. The film is a product of Jean Carper, a former medical journalist who 30 years ago was “part of the propaganda machinery to sell Alzheimer’s to the public.” It describes the transformation she went through as she learned more and more about the disease over the years. It contains critically important messages to the public such as those that could enable to move beyond fear tactics as a powerful strategy for massive fund raising for cure and unrealistic promises for cure into the realm of informed action aimed at prevention of the disease.  A recent article by Dr. Peter Reed, Dr. Jennifer Carson and colleagues in AMA Journal of Ethics provides a compelling discussion of the far reaching negative impacts of “the tragedy discourse of dementia” (which currently is largely driven by the National Alzheimer’s Association) on perpetuating the stigma experienced by this population. It also describes the major missed opportunities caused by it; ones that prevent the implementation of large-scale initiatives and funding that would enable this population to live their life to the fullest despite having substantial cognitive disabilities. (Citation: Reed, P., Carson, J., & Gibb, Z. (2017). Transcending the tragedy discourse of dementia: An ethical imperative for promoting selfhood, meaningful relationships, and well-being. American Medical Association Journal of Ethics, 19(7), 693-701.)  Pfizer’s historic decision to discontinue its efforts to develop treatments for Alzheimer’s disease (announced on January 6, 2018) is an important landmark that may signal a paradigm shift; the decision warrants a closer look elsewhere (as more information will be released to the public about it in the future) not only because of the possible losses it may represent but as importantly the rare opportunity for positive and meaningful fundamental changes it could bring to this underserved population. Should we be surprised about Pfizer’s decision? The collective view of dozens of researchers in U.S., Canada, and U.K. as was reported in detail in the groundbreaking book Alzheimer’s Conundrum: Entanglements of Dementia and Aging by Professor Margaret Lock (published in 2013) suggests that the answer is “No.” Why? Some of the fundamental premises underlying the majority of research studies aimed at finding a cure for Alzheimer’s disease have been called into question in recent years. Examples include, the “Localization Theory;” “the Amyloid Cascade Hypothesis”; Insufficient strength of correlation between amyloid plaques and cognitive dysfunction; the fact that “a good proportion of individuals who harbor plaque (the substance commonly hypothesized to incite the molecular cascade that results in Alzheimer neuropathology) continue to be cognitively in good health;” and the fact that the leap from clinical trials in animal models (such as mice) to humans is substantial and not always fully appreciated and openly recognized. Dr. Allen G. Power, M.D., author of the two books: Dementia Beyond Drugs: Changing the Culture of Care and Dementia Beyond Disease: Enhancing Well-Being, asserts: “If you are waiting for the magic pill . . . .This is probably 50 or 70 illnesses with different combinations of causes, lifestyles, life events, and other diseases feeding into it. There is not going to be a magic bullet coming any time soon. I hope that we’re gonna have drugs that can modify the progression of the disease . . . The truth is that right now we need to care for millions of people who are going to have dementia and what happens is that we put all of our money into this basket of cure and we are putting no money into improving the care for millions of people that need it. So we need to change the balance, I am not saying we should stop doing drug research . . . but we need to drastically change the balance because it’s just not realistic to give 98% of our donation $ to try and find that pill and do nothing for these 5 million people that need something today. I am not saying that to create despair or discourage you. I am saying this to empower you.” He then added:“Go out today and change the life of someone with dementia. Don’t wait for the pill because there are things we can do right now that can re-engage people and create life worth living.”In accordance, Dr. William H. Thomas, M.D., Founder of the Eden Alternative; author of the book What are Old People For? How Elders Will Save the World, states:  “I would be willing to bet there will never be a simple, well tolerated medical cure for dementia. Why not? The human brain is an astonishingly complicated organ and its workings are vastly more complicated than the simple chains of cause and effect on which most medical treatment rely. Nonmedical approaches to the well being of people living with dementia can go far beyond anything any pill has to offer.”Professor Margaret Lock concludes her well-researched and eye-opening book by stating:“In the haste to find cures, less often marked is another problem, namely a shift of attention away from social, political, and environmental factors, including poverty, inequality, discrimination, and racism – factors deeply implicated in disease causation. These are the variables that thus far have received the least attention in the Alzheimer’s disease world.” She adds:“A public health approach to aging and Alzheimer’s will have a much greater effect in reducing the incidence of Alzheimer’s disease worldwide than will the technologically oriented molecular approach currently being heralded as a paradigm shift.” While Pfizer’s decision may at least partially reflect the repeated and very costly failures of “promising” compounds, moving from one extreme (predominant focus on use of public and private dollars for cure) to another (Pfizer’s decision) is likely unhelpful either. A collective scientific and public health pause to deeply, genuinely, and openly reflect about the fundamental premises underlying all previous, current, and future efforts to cure and prevent Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia may ultimately prove as a more reasonable, responsible, and promising approach.  Such reflection might even lead to realizing Marcel Proust’s observation by which, “the real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes, but in having new eyes.”Only through the full commitment to engagement in this deep transformational reflection (to ensure full transparency and accountability, key steps in the reflection process must be open to the public; tax payers and private donors who pay the lion share of drug treatments) it would be possible to regain the public’s trust, which is necessary if we are serious about creating an “authentic partnership” with people living with dementia.  “There is one thing that is essential to science more than intelligent methods; that is, the genuine passion to find the truth, whatever it may be” – Charles Sanders Peirce, American philosopher and scientist who is considered “the father of pragmatism.” Related PostsWhile Awaiting A CureWe owe it to ourselves and our communities to stand up and demand that, while we await development of a cure or treatment for Alzheimer’s Disease, resources are to also be spent on figuring out how to live well with dementia.Will More Money Buy an Alzheimer’s Cure?To much fanfare from the Alzheimer’s disease research lobby, the Obama administration announced plans this week to dramatically increase federal funding on Alzheimer’s. But advocates for those who live with the disease are asking why more isn’t being done to educate the public and improve care and living conditions for…Report finds Alzheimer’s claims $202 billion in unpaid careThe Alzheimer’s Association just released 2011 Alzheimer’s Disease Facts and Figures report sheds light on the staggering cost of unpaid caregiving provided by family members caring for a loved one with Alzheimer’s. Nearly 15 million people in the United States care for a loved one with Alzheimer’s disease or another form…Tweet7Share38Share13Email58 SharesTags: alzheimer’s association Dementialast_img read more

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