Peter Sterling appointed to Blues coaching role

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Peter Sterling appointed to Blues coaching role

first_imgThe Maroons have won ten out of the last eleven series as pressure mounts on Daley and his staff.terling replaces Immortal Bob Fulton who filled the role under Daley, Ricky Stuart and Craig Bellamy.The former Eels, New South Wales and Kangaroos halfback has high hopes for the side.”I feel like I have been asked to step into a situation that is on the verge of something extremely special with the group Laurie has assembled and the decisions he has made during his tenure,” Sterling said.”I am really excited to be involved in something that is a very special part of the game.”Daley said he was thrilled to have someone of Sterlng’s knowledge on board.”I couldn’t be happier that Sterlo was not only available, but really excited about the opportunity,” Daley said.”He will bring so much to our squad that is aligned with the culture and team values we aspire to.”His knowledge of the game is without peer.”last_img read more

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Jagdeo’s office prepares dossier

first_img“25 scandals within 16 months”The A Partnership for National Unity/Alliance For Change (APNU/AFC) Government, led by President DavidOpposition Leader Bharrat JagdeoGranger was elected to office just over 16 months now and the political 6Opposition People’s Progressive Party/Civic (PPP/C) has concluded that the coalition Government has already been embroiled in more questionable practices than the PPP/C which ruled Guyana for 23 years.The Office of the Leader of the Opposition, Bharrat Jagdeo, on Wednesday said it has been diligently monitoring the APNU/AFC Government’s use of public funds and the levels of transparency and accountability; issuing an eight-page ‘dossier’ on 25 “scandals” of the Government over the past 16 months.“The APNU/AFC Government has been exposed with more scandals and corruptions in 16 months than successive PPP/C Administrations were accused of in 23 years,” Jagdeo’s office said, adding that between June 2015 and August 2016, 14 months of the coalition Government, some 16 “scandals” were uncovered.But Jagdeo’s office said that the month of August 2016 “took the cake”with the exposure of the Sussex Street Drug Bond deal, the BK International and Government of Guyana’s $1 billion “out-of-court” settlement and the issuance of two fuel licences to Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of the Guyana Water Inc, Dr Richard Van West-Charles.Among the other “scandals” highlighted by Jagdeo’s Office are the questions which still linger over the inauguration of President David Granger, the alleged removal of eight containers of steel by BK International from the Public Health Ministry compound, the dismissal of close to 2000 Amerindian Community Service Officers (CSO), the appointment of 33 foreign honorary advisors, as well as a number of Presidential and Ministerial advisors.The Opposition also listed the selection of a disqualified company to complete the Specialty Hospital, leading to an abandonment of the project.“The first act of the Government was to give themselves enormous salary increases between 50-100 per cent of what the former Government Ministers received. This was quietly done in September 2015 and the parliamentary Opposition had to wage a struggle in Parliament to bring a motion to reverse this. When the motivon was finally heard in December, it was defeated by the Government’s one seat majority,” Jagdeo’s Office said.It also highlighted the D’Urban Park Development project, pardoning of convicted felons, the US$16 million settlement with Surinamese company, RUDISA, the Georgetown “Clean-up Campaign” and debt write-offs for Demerara Distillers Limited and other businesses by the Guyana Revenue Authority and the Mayor and City Council, as well as the controversial Georgetown parking meter contract.The PPP said that for September 2016, there were four new scandals.The coalition APNU/AFC campaigned on a platform of accountability and transparency and to bring and to deep-rooted corruption in public offices.In April 2016, the US Department of State said that corruption continued to be among the leading human rights problems facing Guyana.“There remained a widespread public perception of corruption involving officials at all levels, including the Police and the judiciary,” the Country Reports on Human Rights Practices for 2015, released by the Department, said, adding that there were very low prosecution of public officials found to be corrupt.The Transparency Institute of Guyana Inc (TIGI) had concluded that there was facilitating and proliferating of corruption in the country, pointing to a number of questionable appointments by the Government, conflict of interest involving at least one Minister and interference in the work of some autonomous agencies like the Guyana Revenue Authority (GRA).However, President Granger had distanced his Government from any corruption, stating that critics should look at the Private Sector where corruption is rampant.last_img read more

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In Colombia biodiversity researchers seek relief from regulatory red tape

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Colombian biologist Jean Paul Delgado dropped plans to sequence the genome of Bolitoglossa ramosi, a native salamander that can regenerate lost limbs, because of burdensome regulations. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country By Andrew J. Wight Feb. 25, 2019 , 4:45 PM MEDELLÍN, COLOMBIA—In 2011, when biologist Jean Paul Delgado set up his laboratory at the University of Antioquia (UdeA) here, he was eager to help his home nation learn more about its extraordinary biological wealth, including some 800 species of salamanders, frogs, and other amphibians. Delgado’s enthusiasm soon turned to frustration, however, and he’s largely abandoned his efforts to study Colombia’s biodiversity.Sitting in his office recently, he displayed the reason: a huge folder stuffed with the paperwork needed to get government permission to collect native species or just sample their DNA. It can take a year or more to obtain approval from Colombia’s Ministry of Environment and Sustainable Development, Delgado says. And, “If you deviate from the contract, there will be consequences” that could include fines and research restrictions.Many Colombian researchers say the cumbersome, stressful process has prompted them to give up on studies involving the nation’s more than 62,000 native species. Delgado, for example, is no longer planning to sequence the genome of Colombian salamander Bolitoglossa ramosi, which regenerates lost limbs. And UdeA chemist Alejandro Martínez dropped his effort to extract useful chemical compounds from marine sponges found along the nation’s Caribbean coast. “My scientific productivity was sadly affected,” Martínez says. Such setbacks, however, moved Delgado to action. Two years ago, he launched a campaign to persuade the government to reform the permit process. Now, after traveling the nation to forge alliances with university leaders and elected officials, Delgado is cautiously optimistic that this could be the year his efforts produce results. One reason for hope: President Iván Duque Márquez, who took office in August 2018, has made biodiversity preservation a “matter of national security,” and signed off on creating the nation’s first science ministry. “The creation of the ministry is an opportunity to make slow processes faster,” says Iván Darío Agudelo Zapata, a member of Colombia’s Senate who championed the creation of the ministry.The problem, researchers argue, is that there were unintended consequences from Colombia’s implementation of international agreements, such as the 1993 Convention on Biological Diversity, designed to give nations greater control over their biologial wealth. In general, those pacts require researchers to explain how they plan to collect and study organisms, and aim to ensure that the nations where those organisms originated share in any profits from valuable discoveries. The rules aren’t supposed to hamper research, but there is often “a lack of understanding of the basis and intentions of international treaties … by the national-level bureaucrats,” says Kamaljit Bawa, a conservation biologist at the University of Massachusetts in Boston who has written about the issue.In Colombia, the result has been red tape that is unecessarily strangling studies, researchers argue. Under current rules, for instance, scientists at Colombian universities need a permit even if they just want to sequence ubiquitous lab organisms such as yeast or fruit flies found within the nation’s borders, notes microbiologist Javier Correa Álvarez of EAFIT, a private research university here. And despite help from his university’s three full-time lawyers, Correa says it recently took him a year to obtain a permit for a field study, “and a year is an eternity in our field.”In order to streamline biodiversity research, the lobby effort is urging the government to end contracts on genetic access, to ease sampling restrictions, and to make the permit process quicker and easier. Such changes “would take a lot of stress and pain away,” Delgado says. Reformers are also thinking about asking the government to grant an amnesty to scientists who have already run afoul of the rules. (It is not clear how many there are; Colombian researchers are reluctant to discuss the matter, and the environment ministry did not respond to an inquiry about how often it has sanctioned scientists.)Change could require action by both Colombia’s Congress and executive branch. But the reformers are hopeful that the country’s increasingly science-friendly political climate, and the creation of the new science ministry, will produce action by the end of this year. “For the first time,” Agudelo notes, “science has a seat in the president’s Cabinet.”center_img In Colombia, biodiversity researchers seek relief from regulatory red tape Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Andrea Gómez/Genetics, Regeneration and Cancer Group at the University of Antioquia last_img read more

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