Graphics student bags on shoppers’ waste

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Graphics student bags on shoppers’ waste

first_imgLegislators across the country have been struggling to find answers to the issue. Recently, San Francisco became the first major U.S city to ban oil-based plastic bags, requiring shoppers to use paper, biodegradable or canvas bags instead. The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors also is considering a similar ban, an effort to deal with the 6 billion plastic grocery bags used in the county each year. “Consumers tend to think of plastic bags as being free, but they are really costly for the environment,” said Bryan Early, a policy associate for the environmental group Californians Against Waste. Early, who focuses on plastic waste, said AB 2449, passed in 2006, will go in effect July 1, forcing all major grocery stores to brand their plastic bags with the message, “Please reuse me.” Stores will also be bound to have reusable bags for sale. “The good thing about this legislation is that it’s taking this first step and really bringing to mind the idea of reusing bags,” Early said. “Hopefully, in the climate we are in of environmental awareness people, realize that these little things we can do really add up to make a difference.” Gail Swanlund, a CalArts faculty member and adviser to Jaster on his project, said graphic design artists have really begun to be more aware of their powers to create change. “Graphic design is a really powerful tool,” Swanlund said. “It’s very engaging on a personal level.” A year and a half ago, Jaster decided he wanted to combine his design skills with his desire for social change by placing bright yellow, blue and green “reuse” graphics on paper bags that he handed out at his local Ralphs market. Jaster’s efforts got him recognition in the art world, and got his work displayed in several art galleries. But he said as time went on, he felt he needed to do more. “I began to wonder what I really achieved. I wanted to prevent the project from becoming a one-liner.” This new tote bag project will bring Jaster back to his regular market. Growing up in communist East Germany until the Berlin Wall crumbled when he was 11, Jaster said his upbringing was definitely different than most Americans his age. “I was not deprived, but it was an environment where you made the most of every little thing you had,” Jaster said. Jaster remembers how amazed he was with the wealth in America when he came here as an exchange student at 16. Grocery bags in particular were always interesting to him because back home, both before and after the fall of the Berlin Wall, the sacks were washed and rinsed after every use. In most European countries, taxes on disposable bags are already levied. “That definitely makes people bring their own bag,” Jaster said with a smirk. As he prepped himself days before the bag event, Jaster admitted he was nervous, but said he’d be happy if just a few were moved by his message. “I am not trying to persuade anyone to change the law. I just want to talk to shoppers directly and let them know they have a lot of power to opt out of a crazy, wasteful habit.” connie.llanos@dailynews.com (661) 257-5254160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! “This is a gesture, a provocation for thought,” Jaster said. “Most conservation efforts go back to the same question, paper or plastic, but they are just confusing the issue with a choice when the real answer is: neither.” His idea is to give a small group of people “sexy bags” that they’ll look forward to using for shopping instead of disposable ones. By taking the bags, the shoppers must agree to use them for at least six months. “This is an ecological intervention that forces people to stop and consider what they are doing to the environment,” Jaster said. Every year, Americans consume more than 100 billion disposable shopping bags – that is 1 million bags a minute. While paper bags traditionally have been looked at as the more eco-friendly option – they are biodegradable and can be recycled, they are made from trees and once used, break down in landfills. Plastic bags are made with petroleum products and end up filling drains, or worse, washing up on ocean shores. VALENCIA – If you see him toiling away by the sewing machine, all this German-born graphic design student asks is that you stop by and chat. His message: Neither paper nor plastic. To celebrate Earth Day, Roman Jaster will be handing out 40 handmade sacks today to shoppers at Ralphs grocery in Valencia’s Granary Square. Jaster, a graphic design student at nearby California Institute of the Arts, said this living art project is his personal crusade against bag waste. last_img read more

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WATCH: Special moment 99-year-old gets her wish to perform ‘Danny Boy’ with Daniel O’Donnell

first_imgThis is the moment Kitty Cosgrave got her wish to sing ‘Danny Boy’ with Daniel O’Donnell, in front of a large audience.Kitty’s daughter, Kathleen, recorded the video on the night and was overjoyed to see her mother get her wish. “She never thought it would happen to her, and to sing Danny Boy with him… No words can describe.” Kathleen said.Footage shows the 99-year-old great-great-grandmother being utterly content during the performance.WATCH: Special moment 99-year-old gets her wish to perform ‘Danny Boy’ with Daniel O’Donnell was last modified: August 17th, 2019 by Shaun KeenanShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Gardai hunt for tin thieves in Buncrana

first_imgGardai are investigating the theft of 40 sheets of galvanised tin from a company at Stragill in Buncrana.The theft of the large number of sheets took place between the 15th and 28th of August.Gardai say a vehicle and trailer would have been needed to transport the stolen sheets. Any information on the theft should be given to Gardai in Buncrana.Gardai hunt for tin thieves in Buncrana was last modified: September 3rd, 2019 by Staff WriterShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:buncranadonegalGardaiTHEFTStinlast_img read more

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Rooibos gets a makeover

first_imgRooibos being harvested at Groenkol Rooibos Farm in the Clanwilliam district of the Western Cape. (Image: Rodger Bosch, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com. For more free photos, visit the image library) The Red Espresso drink with a distinct crema layer makes it look like a coffee although it’s made with a leaf traditionally used for tea. (Image: Kerry Walsh Photography) Tamara O’ReillyThe look, taste and health properties of a South African-invented beverage that’s neither coffee nor tea is causing quite a stir with lovers of both drinks.Red espresso is made from rooibos, the uniquely South African plant that only grows on 250km of the earth’s soil in the Cederburg Mountains in the Northern Cape Province. The drink is made in the same method as an espresso – where the coffee is brewed by forcing extremely hot water through finely ground coffee. Although red espresso is made from a plant considered a tea, it bears the distinct characteristics of an espresso – such as crema, a crème coloured foam that appears on the top of an espresso.The idea for the drink came in 2005, when Carl Pretorius, a firm coffee drinker, began realising the toll that the caffeinated drink was taking on his body. He began playing around with ideas and after months of sourcing the best rooibos and experimenting with preparation methods, he came up with a complimentary combination of a tea made like a coffee.“Red espresso offers a healthy alternative to coffee without compromising on taste or style and satisfies my need for an authentic espresso experience,” says Pretorius. “I didn’t want to give up on the ritual and sophistication of coffee, but I also didn’t want to drink an ordinary cup of tea. Delicious, full-bodied, caffeine-free and even coated with crema, red espresso is my solution to having the best of both – good health and espresso style.”The drink is caffeine free and contains five times the amount of antioxidants, which are said to help with a host of ailments like headaches, digestive problems and boosting the immune system.In its three-year-existence, the drink has become available in coffee shops, restaurants and stores around the country and has debuted to wide acclaim internationally.  It is available in the US, Canada, Portugal, Denmark, Switzerland and parts of Asia.In the first year of the drink’s launch in South Africa, more than one million cups of espresso were sold. This doubled in the second year and the product is now a staple in many homes and restaurants. Red espresso shines when made in an espresso machine or stovetop espresso machine but it can be made using other appliances like a drip coffee machine or percolator.  Like its coffee counterpart, red espresso can also be used to make lattes and cappuccinos.Coffee connoisseurs and organisations that honour innovations have also taken notice. In 2006 it won the New Product of the Year Award at the 2006 SA Food Review/Symrise New Product Competition. The competition rewards innovative food that is true to South African eating trends as well as its accompanying marketing.According to SA Food Review’s Brenda Neall, this is quite an award. “Reaching the finals of this competition, never mind winning it, takes some doing. Each entry goes under the beady scrutiny of its creator’s peers on the judging panel – including marketers, food scientists, dieticians, packaging experts, and a microbiologist. Apart from uniqueness, market demand for the product and its sustainability is carefully evaluated.”At the World Tea Expo held in Las Vegas in May 2008, it was named one of the Top 10 Tea Products. Red espresso’s greatest achievement though is winning the Best New Product award in the Specialty Beverage Category at the world’s largest coffee show organised by the Specialty Coffee Association of America.“As a South African company, bringing this award home feels like winning the World Cup. The coffee industry is huge and incredibly competitive. For us to get their endorsement is a major feat,” said Pretorius on winning the award.  “I am delighted that my invention has such global appeal. I also feel privileged to have such fantastic support and such talented people around me. It comes through in everything about red espresso.”The farm from which the rooibos is sourced takes great pride in producing and harvesting the best quality leaves. Apparently, four generations of rooibos farmers have operated from this farm, rendering the current farmers experts on the subject.   The plant thrives in the high altitude, rocky soil and a very specific climate which cannot be mimicked.Do you have any comments or queries about this article? Email Tamara O’Reilly at tamarao@mediaclubsouthafrica.com.Related articlesAn infusion of innovationSpreading the love – and profit Slackpacking in the CederburgUseful links Specialty Coffee Association of America Red Espresso SA Food Review  South African Foodieslast_img read more

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Black Friday Vs. Cyber Monday: Toward A New Shopping Calendar

first_imgThe Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technology Related Posts What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … christina ortiz Are Black Friday and Cyber Monday fighting a battle neither of them can win? It certainly looks that way as shopping landscape shifst both online and offline. A few holiday seasons down the road, both big-deal days may seem as quaint and dated as Sears Catalogs and keeping stores closed on Sundays. Enter Cyber Monday The term “Cyber Monday” was born during the holiday season of 2005, when the U.S. Trade Association’s National Retail Federation began to notice that shoppers who had just spent the entire Thanksgiving weekend barreling through crowded stores, were cyber-shopping when they sat down at their work computers on the following Monday. The federation’s site Shop.org officially coined the term in 2005 and set up an eponymous site in 2006. Obviously, post-Thanksgiving online shopping at work had been going on long before the NRF put a name on it. But it’s grown into something bigger and more influential, not only changing the way Black Friday works, but also the way retail stores handle the holiday shopping season. Cyber Monday revealed the biggest weakness in the Black Friday concept: brick-and-mortar. What used to be an asset is now hurting this once powerful shopping day as harried workers rebel against early hours and ornery customers fighting over flat screens. Add on the fact that retailers are now expanding Black Friday into Thanksgiving evening, and you’ve got one messed up system. That’s why Black Friday is now projected to be only the second busiest shopping day of the year, behind Cyber Monday. Research from Compuware APM pegs total spending on Cyber Monday at $1.44 billion. But what about Cyber Monday? Does it even make sense?In the modern world, it doesn’t matter what day it is, wherever you are, you can shop the holiday sales from anywhere as long as you’re connected. Most shoppers now have decent Internet connections from home, and as Dan Rowinski pointed out last week, mobile shopping now accounts for about 12% of the purchases made on Cyber Monday. Obviously, you don’t need to be back at work to use your smartphone.Et Tu, Target? So what’s the future of Cyber Monday in a world where office computers are not required to buy online? Retailers are recognizing this and beating Cyber Monday to the punch by starting sales earlier – both online and in store. The sales calendars don’t matter any more, but that doesn’t mean retailers won’t try to leverage the ideas with sales and deals tied to no-longer-relevant concepts.Online-only sites like Amazon are morphing Cyber Monday into Cyber Week. They’re posting new deals every day leading up to Black Friday or during the week following Cyber Monday to help keep the shopping excitement going longer. Brent Shelton, a spokesman for FatWallet, told the Daily Finance Blog that we should be expecting events like “Cyber Monday II” on December 5. Whether it’s longer sales online or in store, the retail calendar we follow today won’t stand the test of time. And that’s probably a good thing compared to getting up at 4am to stand in line at Wal-Mart – or spending your work day on eBay.Image courtesy of Shuttershock.center_img Tags:#Amazon#e-commerce Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagementlast_img read more

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Karni Sena leader agrees to watch Padmaavat

first_imgFilm distributors in Rajasthan on Monday announced that they would not acquire the distribution rights of Sanjay Leela Bhansali’s film, Padmaavat, with Rajput groups demandinga complete ban on the movie and threatening violence at cinema halls screening the period drama.The film exhibitors also gave in writing to Rajput Karni Sena, spearheading an agitation that they would not screen the film. Meanwhile,Karni Sena founder Lokendra Singh Kalvi agreed to watch Padmaavat on Mr. Bhansali’s invitation before its release on January 25.Rajasthan’s leading film distributors, Yash Raj Jai Pictures and Marudhar Cine Entertainment, said that they had decided not to distribute the movie in the State. The decision came four days after the Supreme Court stayed the notifications and orders of Rajasthan and two other States banning the film’s release. .Hearing todaythree-judge bench of the apex court would hear on Tuesday the State government’s interim application seeking modification of its January 18 order allowing the film’s release. Home Minister Gulab Chand Kataria on Monday asked Karni Sena and the erstwhile royal family of Mewar to become co-petitioners in the case by filing review petitions.“We have conveyed people’s sentiments to the Supreme Court through our petition seeking recall of its order. We have to find a way out to respect the popular beliefs and faith in history, which should not be distorted,” said Mr. Kataria. He said the State government had invited the Rajput groups to join the legal recourse to get the matter settled.Mr. Kalvi told reporters that a “public curfew” would be enforced and protests organised outside the cinema theatres if Padmaavat was screened. He also said that he had accepted the film-makers’ invitation to watch the movie at a pre-screening event, but added that he knew it was a “ploy to deceive Rajputs”.Youth climbs towerProtesters blocked highways in Rajsamand and Barmer and raised slogans outside two cinema halls in Jaipur, warning them against screening the film. A 20-year-old youth climbed a mobile phone network tower in Bhilwara demanding a ban on the movie. He was later brought down.The Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh (RSS) extended support to the demand for ban on Padmaavat, saying no one should be allowed to distort history.last_img read more

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