Warriors HQ: Second unit struggles in first playoff series

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Warriors HQ: Second unit struggles in first playoff series

first_imgWarriors beat writers Dieter Kurtenbach and Mark Medina break down the “scheming” plays the Los Angeles Clippers performed to expose concerning weaknesses in Golden State’s second unit. From the unconventional decision to make Patrick Beverley guard Kevin Durant to DeMarcus Cousins being consistently frustrated by the Clippers’ pick and roll plays, the pair also review some changes coach Steve Kerr may consider making going into game two.5:00: Do second unit struggles warrant more Andrew …last_img read more

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Rooibos gets a makeover

first_imgRooibos being harvested at Groenkol Rooibos Farm in the Clanwilliam district of the Western Cape. (Image: Rodger Bosch, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com. For more free photos, visit the image library) The Red Espresso drink with a distinct crema layer makes it look like a coffee although it’s made with a leaf traditionally used for tea. (Image: Kerry Walsh Photography) Tamara O’ReillyThe look, taste and health properties of a South African-invented beverage that’s neither coffee nor tea is causing quite a stir with lovers of both drinks.Red espresso is made from rooibos, the uniquely South African plant that only grows on 250km of the earth’s soil in the Cederburg Mountains in the Northern Cape Province. The drink is made in the same method as an espresso – where the coffee is brewed by forcing extremely hot water through finely ground coffee. Although red espresso is made from a plant considered a tea, it bears the distinct characteristics of an espresso – such as crema, a crème coloured foam that appears on the top of an espresso.The idea for the drink came in 2005, when Carl Pretorius, a firm coffee drinker, began realising the toll that the caffeinated drink was taking on his body. He began playing around with ideas and after months of sourcing the best rooibos and experimenting with preparation methods, he came up with a complimentary combination of a tea made like a coffee.“Red espresso offers a healthy alternative to coffee without compromising on taste or style and satisfies my need for an authentic espresso experience,” says Pretorius. “I didn’t want to give up on the ritual and sophistication of coffee, but I also didn’t want to drink an ordinary cup of tea. Delicious, full-bodied, caffeine-free and even coated with crema, red espresso is my solution to having the best of both – good health and espresso style.”The drink is caffeine free and contains five times the amount of antioxidants, which are said to help with a host of ailments like headaches, digestive problems and boosting the immune system.In its three-year-existence, the drink has become available in coffee shops, restaurants and stores around the country and has debuted to wide acclaim internationally.  It is available in the US, Canada, Portugal, Denmark, Switzerland and parts of Asia.In the first year of the drink’s launch in South Africa, more than one million cups of espresso were sold. This doubled in the second year and the product is now a staple in many homes and restaurants. Red espresso shines when made in an espresso machine or stovetop espresso machine but it can be made using other appliances like a drip coffee machine or percolator.  Like its coffee counterpart, red espresso can also be used to make lattes and cappuccinos.Coffee connoisseurs and organisations that honour innovations have also taken notice. In 2006 it won the New Product of the Year Award at the 2006 SA Food Review/Symrise New Product Competition. The competition rewards innovative food that is true to South African eating trends as well as its accompanying marketing.According to SA Food Review’s Brenda Neall, this is quite an award. “Reaching the finals of this competition, never mind winning it, takes some doing. Each entry goes under the beady scrutiny of its creator’s peers on the judging panel – including marketers, food scientists, dieticians, packaging experts, and a microbiologist. Apart from uniqueness, market demand for the product and its sustainability is carefully evaluated.”At the World Tea Expo held in Las Vegas in May 2008, it was named one of the Top 10 Tea Products. Red espresso’s greatest achievement though is winning the Best New Product award in the Specialty Beverage Category at the world’s largest coffee show organised by the Specialty Coffee Association of America.“As a South African company, bringing this award home feels like winning the World Cup. The coffee industry is huge and incredibly competitive. For us to get their endorsement is a major feat,” said Pretorius on winning the award.  “I am delighted that my invention has such global appeal. I also feel privileged to have such fantastic support and such talented people around me. It comes through in everything about red espresso.”The farm from which the rooibos is sourced takes great pride in producing and harvesting the best quality leaves. Apparently, four generations of rooibos farmers have operated from this farm, rendering the current farmers experts on the subject.   The plant thrives in the high altitude, rocky soil and a very specific climate which cannot be mimicked.Do you have any comments or queries about this article? Email Tamara O’Reilly at tamarao@mediaclubsouthafrica.com.Related articlesAn infusion of innovationSpreading the love – and profit Slackpacking in the CederburgUseful links Specialty Coffee Association of America Red Espresso SA Food Review  South African Foodieslast_img read more

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Lawyers protest arrest of Nagpur advocate Surendra Gadling

first_imgLawyers from the Indian Association of People’s Lawyers have expressed their concern over the arrest of advocate Surendra Gadling from his house in Nagpur, alleging an attack on lawyers who are fighting cases of marginalised people.Mr. Gadling has been arrested in relation with the violence at Bhima Koregaon near Pune when Dalits congregated to celebrate the British victory over Peshwas with the help of Mahar soldiers.Addressing the media here on Thursday, IAPL vice-president Sudha Bharadwaj said that the sudden arrest was part of a pattern where “people’s lawyers” are being targeted, in violation of the widely-held norm that “being a lawyer of a political prisoner is not a crime”.A release by the IAPL said that this is part of a larger pattern: advocates Upendra Nayak of Odisha, Murugan of Tamil Nadu and Satyendra Chaubey of Chhattisgarh “have all been implicated in the cases of their own clients, which is absolutely unacceptable as per United Nations principles on the role of lawyers”.“In the morning of June 6, 2018, the Pune Police arrested senior advocate Surendra Gadling from his house in Nagpur at 6 a.m. The arrest has been made in connection with an FIR registered on January 8, 2018 at Vishrambaug PS in Pune. The FIR originally alleged inciting communal harmony at the Elgar Parishad program organised on December 31, 2018 to commemorate 200 years of the victory of Mahar soldiers over the Peshwa in the Bhima Koregaon battle,” the release said. “In March 2018, the case was converted into a criminal conspiracy. On April 17, 2018, though the FIR did not originally name advocate Gadling, the police raided his house and office and confiscated all possible CDs, hard disks, computer systems – including the family’s devices. Yesterday he and other intellectuals and activists were arrested in the same case, by adding several sections of the draconian Unlawful Activities Prevention Act (UAPA), which ensures long detention and difficulty in obtaining bail.”Apart from Mr. Gadling, head of the English department at Nagpur University Shoma Sen, Marathi poet Sudhir Dhavale, Rona Wilson of the Committee for the Release of Political Prisoners and anti-displacement activist Mahesh Raut have also been arrested.“The bias of the state is all the more obvious when the leaders of Hindutva organisations named in many complaints and FIRs as instigators of the Bhima Koregaon violence – Milind Ekbote and Sambhaji Bhide – whose anticipatory bail applications have been refused by even the Supreme Court, still roam free,” the release said.last_img read more

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Odisha group starts drive to retrieve discarded flags

first_imgA group of environmental activists of Odisha’s Berhampur are engaged in retrieving national flags made of paper and plastic that have been thrown all around the city after the Republic Day celebrations.They are members of Berhampur Sabuja Bahini. “We were hurt to see our national flag thrown in garbage dumps, drains and on the roadside,” said BSB president Sibaram Panigrahy. “Many people buy paper and polythene flags to express nationalistic fervour on Republic Day. However, after a few hours, they have no hesitation in disposing of these flags in a derogatory manner,” said BSB member P. Aravind Kumar.In its bid to create awareness among the people to respect the Tricolour, the BSB started its drive to salvage the discarded flags on January 27. During the drive, which continued on Monday, the activists told the residents that the national flag is like a picture of deities and it should not be disposed of unceremoniously. The Tricolours salvaged by this group are being cleaned up and stored. “We will reuse them in future events,” said BSB secretary M. Dilip Kumar. The members of the group said they were happy to see that the use of polythene flags had gone down drastically in Berhampur in comparison to the Independence Day celebrations last year.last_img read more

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