Report: H5N1 mutated rapidly in Indonesian cluster

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Report: H5N1 mutated rapidly in Indonesian cluster

first_imgJul 12, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – Genetic studies show that the H5N1 avian influenza virus mutated multiple times as it spread through an Indonesia family in May, but the significance of the changes is uncertain, according to a news report today in Nature.The journal, basing its report on confidential genetic sequence data, published a chart showing that a total of 32 mutations were identified in viruses collected from six patients in the family case cluster. Previous reports from the World Health Organization and other experts gave the impression that only a few mutations had been found.The case cluster in North Sumatra involved a 37-year-old woman who apparently contracted the virus from poultry and then passed it to six relatives before she died. One of those six, a 10-year-old boy, then passed the virus to his father. WHO officials said last month that a specific mutation found in the boy and his father marked the first laboratory confirmation of human-to-human transmission of the virus.On May 23, the WHO said genetic sequencing of two viruses from the case cluster had shown “no evidence of genetic reassortment with human or pig influenza viruses and no evidence of significant mutations.” A month later, at the end of an avian flu conference in Jakarta, WHO officials told reporters the virus had mutated slightly when it infected the 10-year-old boy, and the same mutation showed up in his father. The mutation didn’t make the virus more transmissible or virulent, officials said.The genetic data obtained by Nature came from a presentation by University of Hong Kong virologist Malik Peiris at a closed session of the Jakarta meeting in June, the article says.The magazine says that 21 mutations were identified in a virus from the father of the 10-year-old boy, involving seven of the virus’s eight genes, suggesting that the virus was evolving rapidly as it spread. In addition, from one to four mutations were found in viruses collected from five other patients.The story says one of the mutations confers resistance to the antiviral drug amantadine, a finding not reported by the WHO.However, the virus did not spread beyond the extended family, as the article notes. “Many of the genetic changes did not result in the use of different amino acids by the virus,” the story says. “And there were no amino-acid changes in key receptor binding sites known to affect pathogenicity and transmissibility.”According to the magazine, viruses from six of the eight cases in the cluster have been sequenced, but the WHO has not shared the findings, saying they belong to Indonesia. The data have been released only to a few researchers linked to the WHO and the US Centers for Diseases Control and Prevention, the story says.Virologists quoted by the journal asserted that the withholding of sequence data on H5N1 is hindering scientists’ understanding of the virus. But WHO staff member Paul Gully replied, according to the article, that the agency’s job is investigating outbreaks, not doing academic research, and that labs don’t have the time or resources to do “high-quality sequencing” during outbreaks.See also:May 23 WHO statement on genetic data from the case clusterhttp://www.who.int/csr/don/2006_05_23/en/index.htmlJun 23 CIDRAP News story “H5N1 mutation showed human transmission in Indonesia”last_img read more

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Miranda Ramirez leads Syracuse to 5-2 home-opening win over Cornell

first_img Published on January 26, 2020 at 8:06 pm Contact Thomas: tgshults@syr.edu | @ThomasShults5 Facebook Twitter Google+ It all started in warmups when senior captain Miranda Ramirez yelled out instructions to her young teammates, of whom three of six are freshmen.After Syracuse lost the doubles point, Ramirez, the No. 80 singles player in the nation, huddled everyone up and urged SU to “take the singles, we can’t let them have any more breaks.” They listened, and Ramirez’s 6-1, 7-5 singles win clinched a team victory and SU’s fourth singles match win. Ramirez added a doubles victory to improve to 6-0 on the season in Syracuse’s (3-0) 5-2 win over Cornell (0-4).“We know that we have the confidence to beat this team,” Ramirez said postgame.SU lost the doubles point when partners Polina Kozyreva and Zeynep Erman, as well as ITA’s No. 48 Kim Hansen and Sonya Treshcheva both lost. Then, led by Ramirez, SU huddled and regrouped to win five of the first six singles sets.Even though Ramirez encouraged her teammates to play assuredly, her own confidence waned in her singles match against Ashley Huang. After cruising through the first set 6-1, Ramirez stumbled in the second. All looked to be going as planned for Ramirez, up 3-1 in the second set before coughing up three straight games, and falling behind 4-3.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textHead coach Younes Limam said there’s “ups and downs” in tennis, and after taking a sip of Gatorade and consulting with assistant coach Jennifer Meredith, Ramirez turned to her trusty serve for back-to-back aces to swing momentum.“Mentally I had to stay strong and just sort of know that like I was better,” Ramirez said. “It was a little closer than I think it needed to be but it’s alright as long as I get the W in the end.”Ramirez’s aces led to her taking four the next five games, breaking Huang’s serve once. At one point, Huang led out a frustrated sigh, banging the green tarp by the wall with her racket after losing the set lead. After regaining the lead, Ramirez’s straight-faced demeanor also returned.Hansen and Guzal Yusupova played similarly in control, losing a combined four games total. Freshman Kozyreva, playing in place of an injured No. 111 Sofya Golubovskaya, won 6-1, 7-6 for SU’s fifth singles win.After its third straight win, Syracuse circled to stretch, with the veteran Ramirez leading the routine. Leadership comes naturally, said Ramirez. And even when she was struggling, Limam said he wasn’t too concerned with Ramirez’s match, evidence of the trust they’ve developed over the past four years.“They all owned their court, and I’m super proud of them,” said Ramirez. “So it’s a great team win today.” Commentslast_img read more

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