Can’t accept Dutee Chand’s same-sex relation, says mother

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Can’t accept Dutee Chand’s same-sex relation, says mother

first_img Sprinter Dutee Chand, who recently came out about her same-sex relationship with a younger relative is facing a tough battle of acceptance in her family.After her elder sister Saraswati’s alleged that Dutee is being pressurised and blackmailed, the athlete’s mother Akhoji Chand told ANI, that it is not possible for her to accept her daughter’s relationship status. When asked if there is any conspiracy, he said, “I feel some conspiracy may have happened to exploit her property and income. There may be some enemies behind it who may have created a conspiracy. Dutee should avoid this matter and should focus on her sports career.” Meanwhile, Ananata Charan Das, one of the neighbours, said, “I have no opinion (on this matter). It is personal and sensitive. The Supreme Court has decided one can marry (same-sex)… a girl can marry a girl. So, it may be possible in society and in front of law but I can’t appreciate it because our villagers won’t like this.” First Published: 20th May, 2019 15:43 IST LIVE TV Asia News International READ: Dutee Chand Faces Expulsion From Family After Revealing Same Sex Relationship “I told her (Dutee) that I cannot accept this. She told me that the court has given the order. When I asked which court has given you such order, she told me that High court. I told her that I’m alive here and you are bringing orders from the court. She told me that yes court has given order and all the mentors are supporting me. (She asked) whether you will support me or not. I asked which Sir, Shiv Sir, Gagan Sir or Samanta sir, Achyut Samant of KIIT college,” she said. “I want that she (Dutee) should focus on her sports as the government wants. Government has given a lot of money to her for the sake of the country. Dutee may not keep father and mother’s name but she should keep the prestige of the nation through her sports,” Akhoji added. Last Updated: 20th May, 2019 15:43 IST Can’t Accept Dutee Chand’s Same-sex Relation, Says Mother Sprinter Dutee Chand, who recently came out about her same-sex relationship with a younger relative is facing a tough battle of acceptance in her family Written By COMMENT Dutee, the 100m record holder, was hailed for her brave revelation by social media users.The sprinter had made the country proud by clinching two silver medals at the 2018 Asian Games. “Dutee wants to marry a girl, who is the daughter of my niece, so she is my grand-daughter. In this relation, Dutee will be like a mother of that girl. Then how will it be possible in our society in Odisha,” Akhoji told ANI. FOLLOW US SUBSCRIBE TO US “She told that I’ll do everything by the help of them. I told her that I’ll like to talk to them, but she avoided it. So day before yesterday, I told my elder daughter Saraswati that I don’t know where they are staying, you take me to them. Saraswati took me to them but he (Achyut Samant of KIIT) had already left for Delhi and yesterday when all these things were happening.” WATCH US LIVE READ: ‘In The Future, I Would Like To Settle Down With Her’: India’s Fastest Woman Dutee Chand Reveals That She Is In A Same-sex Relationshiplast_img read more

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Enjoy your honeymoon in Mauritius

first_imgA view of the Pereybere beach, the smallest and one of the best in the islandRediscovered in the 16th century (though Arab and Malay sailors are known to have visited the island as early as the 10th century) by the Portuguese, Mauritius was uninhabited until 1598 when first the Dutch,,A view of the Pereybere beach, the smallest and one of the best in the islandRediscovered in the 16th century (though Arab and Malay sailors are known to have visited the island as early as the 10th century) by the Portuguese, Mauritius was uninhabited until 1598 when first the Dutch, then French and finally the British colonised the tiny island before it became independent in 1968.Even though the British rule lasted a relatively longer period, the French roots are more evident in the Mauritian lifestyle and people still prefer to speak Creole and French over the official English language.Right from the time when you set foot at the SSR International Airport at Plaisance, chances are that if you say you are from India, the locals, who proudly refer to the island as ‘Little India’-a moniker attributed to former Prime Minister Indira Gandhi, will give you a warmer welcome. Not surprising since over 68 per cent of Mauritians are of Indian origin whose forefathers migrated to Mauritius as indentured labourers during the British rule.Though India is seventh among top 10 nations in the Mauritius tourism pie, it contributes only a fraction to the market dominated by Europe till now. However, the Mauritian Tourism minister Nando Bodha plans to change that. He recently announced plans to attract over 100,000 Indian tourists within the next five years, more than doubling the number from the existing 49,779 (as per February 25, 2011 data). Says the minister, “Being initially frequented by honeymooners only, today we have different segment of travellers from India visiting the island.””Both Mauritius and India have a long standing historical and cultural connect. It offers the Indian travellers a perfect feel of home away from home while taking an international vacation with family, friends or spouse,” adds Bodha.Deputy director of the Mauritius Tourism Promotion Authority (MTPA) Vijaye Haulder agrees. “We speak Hindi, our culture and food habits are similar, what’s not to like,” he says.Mauritian Sega dancers on the beachThis ‘rainbow’ nation offers a blend of cultures, Indian, African, Chinese, French and British. And there’s plenty to do, from various sporting activities to visiting leisure parks, undersea walks, submarine rides to watching hundreds of dolphins accompanying your catamaran, lazing on beaches or long drives on the ‘tea route’ lined by tea estates are just a few of the excellent options. For a sublime experience visit the Belle Mare beach before the first light to view the perfect sunrise and head to Flic en Flac at dusk for the most surreal sunset you are likely to see, ever. At Vieux Grand Port, the oldest settlement in southeast Mauritius, you can see the ruins of the first Dutch fortifications. Or visit a former sugar factory at Beau Plan’s Aventure du Sucre. The museum here tells the story of sugar, the original economy booster once upon a time, and along the way covers the history of Mauritius.Have you heard of the Talipot Palm which flowers once in 60 years and withers thereafter? If you are lucky you might just see one in full bloom at the SSR Botanical Garden in Pamplemousses which also houses 500 different species of plants. With rising spending power, the Indian tourist, who tends to spend over Rs 16,000 per person per day, is increasingly being wooed by the island which relies on tourism as one of its prime sources of income. “Mauritius is an extremely popular mid-haul destination especially among the honeymoon travellers,” agrees Amal Rakeshi, Thomas Cook’s associate vice president Leisure Travel Outbound.”In the past few years it has caught up with families also. Honeymooners and families looking for a relaxing holiday with a focus on water sports look at Mauritius as an ideal destination,” adds Rakeshi. Arrivals from India, the nation’s top source for Asian tourists, went up by 26.8 per cent in 2010 to 49,779 (39,252 in 2009).In response, the authorities in the island nation are looking at new ways to woo the Indian tourist too. “We organise international golf tournaments and aim to introduce polo to attract the top segment of travellers,” says MTPA’s Haulder.Exploring the undersea world is a popular choice among touristsBodha’s ministry is also promoting the island as a wedding destination for Indians on the lookout for innovative options for this most memorable day. In the last six months MTPA has helped in organising over five big Indian weddings. “You have to give us at least a three month prior notice, we’ll take care of the rest for you,” says Haulder adding that they had to turn down half a dozen requests due to lack of time recently. The MTPA has instituted a special committee to push the wedding tourism strategy.Travelling to the island can be comparatively expensive though. It has four direct entry points from India-Delhi, Mumbai, Chennai and Bangalore, though only the Mauritian national carrier flies on this route.Rakeshi attributes the sustained interest to special deals at popular resorts which more than make up for the airfare. “Direct flights, no crime and discrimination, people of Indian origin works with travellers. It’s a mix of activities and sightseeing to families who are looking for more than relaxation. It’s the safe, easy to get around, more exotic than the Far East destination image that sells,” he says.”Good resorts with private access to nice pristine beaches, lack of Thailand-like nightlife makes it more exotic than the other beach destinations closer home,” adds Rakeshi.Whether you are the gung-ho activity seeker or looking for a romantic interlude, Mauritius offers more than you can expect to pack in on your average three- to seven-day trip. So pack your swimsuits and head for this exotic island just about seven hours by flight from India. The writer is a journalist based in Mauritius.advertisementadvertisementlast_img read more

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Mohawk man beats Canada Customs on illegal search case

first_imgTom FennarioAPTN NewsA Mohawk man from Akwesasne has beaten charges he was facing from the Canadian Border Services Agency (CBSA) with a never-before-used defence.“It’s harassmen – they have no right to do this to people around here,” said Kanawakeron Jody Swamp.In 2017, Swamp, 53, was pulled over at customs in Cornwall Ont., just across the river from where he lives in Akwesasne.Swamp was in possession of about $300 worth of firecrackers.He was charged with three violations of the Customs Act, along with a single charge for transporting explosives, even though he was coming from the Ontario side of Akwesasne, Kawehno:ke island.“As soon as I saw this case, and read the legislation, I thought this doesn’t make sense and something needs to be done,” said Swamp’s lawyer Keith Gordon.What upset Gordon is that CBSA doesn’t appear to be following its own rules.So the Mohawk Ojibway lawyer set out to prove it.Gordon argued before an Ontario judge that in 2012, the CBSA told a senate committee travellers not suspected of coming from the U.S. “would be release [sic] right away.”This was in reference to Cornwall’s unique position as the only Canadian port of entry that has both local and international traffic.That’s because the Akwesasne Mohawk Territory falls on the borders of Quebec, Ontario and New York State.This means travellers coming from New York must cross through Kawehno:ke (also known as Cornwall island) in Akwesasne, before reaching the Canadian port of entry in Cornwall.Even Akwesasne residents coming from the New York side who live on the island must pass through customs in Cornwall before returning to the island.Mohawks who live on Kawehno:ke must pass through customs whenever they want to go into Cornwall, which they consider their unceded territory and where they need to do shopping and other errands.“Everybody on this island [Kawehno:ke] they must go through there at least twice a day, three times a day. People want to get groceries and stuff like that,” explained Swamp when asked what daily life is like on Akwesasne’s Ontario side.Akwesasne Mohawks make up about 70 per cent of traffic at the Cornwall customs, and during rush hours the wait can add quite a bit of time to the commute.Gordon says they are treated like criminals on their own unceded territory.“I’ve been asking myself, ‘Why isn’t it being challenged? Why is it being continued? Why am I hearing people of this community talk about discrimination, arbitrariness, harassment?’” he asked.Last week, an Ontario judge ruled because Swamp was travelling within Canada, he could not be searched without reasonable suspicion.“A weight was lifted off my shoulders, you know, having them come down on me, for no reason, and having me going through the court system for so long, it was just a big relief,” said Swamp.In an email to APTN News CBSA declined to be interviewed and said they are “reviewing the court decision and will assess next steps.”They have 30 days to appeal the decision.For now, Gordon and Swamp will savour a victory they hope will set a precedent.“The argument is, Canada, follow your own laws,” concluded Gordon.tfennario@aptn.ca@tfennariolast_img read more

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