Vietnam looks to tap huge offshore wind potential

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Vietnam looks to tap huge offshore wind potential

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Nhȃn Dȃn:The sea from Quy Nhon to Ho Chi Minh City is considered one of the areas with the greatest potential for offshore wind power production in the world, with average wind speeds of 7-11 metres per second, experts have said.The assessment was provided at a roundtable discussion on the development of offshore wind power in Vietnam with Dutch experience, held by the Dutch Embassy in Vietnam in collaboration with the Vietnamese Ministry of Industry and Trade (MoIT) in Hanoi on April 9.Speaking at the event, Do Duc Quan, Deputy Head of the MoIT’s Electricity and Renewable Energy Authority, said that the demand for energy in Vietnam, especially electricity during 2020-2030, would be huge, as energy demand is increasing, while energy supply is and will be facing challenges, amidst traditional energy sources such as hydropower, coal, oil and gas that are gradually depleted and difficult to develop.In such context, considering the exploitation of renewable energy sources, the Vietnamese government aims to produce 10.7% of electricity from renewable sources by 2030. It targets that the total wind power capacity will reach about 1,000 MW by 2020 and 6,200 MW by 2030.Currently, Vietnam’s total installed wind power capacity is about 190MW, with four wind farms onshore and near shore with a capacity of 6 MW to 100 MW each, while an additional of 263 MW of wind power is under construction and 412 MW is in the process of appraisal approval. Approximately 4,236 MW have been approved, raising the total registered wind power capacity to 10,729 MW.With great advantages in wind power, especially the sea area from Quy Nhon city, in Binh Dinh province, to HCM City, offshore wind energy in Vietnam has yet been fully exploited. Meanwhile, the Netherlands is one of the top five countries in the world in research and development of offshore energy. The Dutch experience would be useful to Vietnam in selecting the optimal solution for the development of offshore wind power in the most appropriate way, Quan emphasised.More: Huge potential for offshore wind power development in Vietnam Vietnam looks to tap huge offshore wind potentiallast_img read more

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Lauderhill Vice Mayor Faces Criticism Over Comments About Black Lives Matter

first_imgHowever, Berger was not finished defending his position, speaking at length about the protests, dividing them in three groups: peaceful protesters, professional agitators and “people who just want free stuff.” He said BLM has intertwined itself among the three groups. The vice mayor made several “what about” statements citing looting, destruction of property and the police officers who have been killed during the protests. He argued about the “gang-style killings that are taking place in our urban areas…where’s the outrage? All murders matter. Why is there no debate?” “One act of racism is as important as a thousand acts of racism…The other issue is whenever we have a discussion about race, there’s a sense of denial. We constantly give an excuse why we should not address these issues,” Campbell said, taking issue with Berger’s representation of the larger discourse about race. At a time when protests sparked by the death of George Floyd continue around the country—and when Nascar is banning Confederate flags, the NFL is condemning “racism and the systematic oppression of Black People” and many legislators, CEOs, and other leaders are taking a stance against police brutality and systemic racism, it would seem inconceivable that a vice mayor in a city that is 78 percent black would vote against a resolution calling for an end to police brutality against black people. But it happened. Representative Shervin D. Jones, who was invited to the virtual meeting, said he was baffled and angry at Berger’s comments. He tweeted, “Last night while joining a virtual mtg for a Broward City to speak on a resolution acknowledging that #BLM & to speak against police brutality, I was baffled by the comments of their Vice Mayor & him condemning the movement. I hung up in anger and realized ‘THIS is why we march.’” Berger, who tried to amend language of the resolution, called it “adversarial” and “factually misleading in its entirety,” citing news sources which state that “crime and suspect behavior, not race, determine police action” and there’s no racial bias in policing. The vice mayor seemed to gloss over the statistic that 1 in 1,000 black men is at risk of being killed by police, 2.5 times as many as whites saying, “Yes, it’s greater than whites. But you have to figure out, does the claim in this resolution aptly reflect that statistic?” Berger said he did not want to “piggyback” on the BLM movement, because they have a “radical agenda,” which includes abolishing prisons, having mass surveillance, defunding the police and other proposals which he does not agree with. The resolution states that Lauderhill “adamantly opposes the use of excessive force, police brutality and the unlawful killing of black people” and called for Congress and the Florida Legislature “to take immediate action to end the existing police practices that target black people and that result in the unlawful killing of black people.”center_img Campbell called out Berger for his opposition to the resolution, pointing out that whenever Berger has called on the commission to vote on resolutions he has proposed on issues impacting the Jewish community, they have always supported him as it was the right thing to do. The comments came as Berger defended his position on a resolution Commissioner Richard Campbell proposed, supporting BLM and condemning police brutality. Berger—the sole Caucasian member on the commission in a city with a 78 percent black population—was the only “no” vote on the resolution. Lauderhill Vice Mayor Howard Berger is taking heat over comments he made regarding the Black Lives Matter (BLM) movement at the city’s virtual commission meeting on Monday. Supporting the “few bad apples” narrative, Berger said, “If a person reads this resolution, he or she would think a police officer gets up in the morning, goes to work with the intention of shooting an African-American” and that the resolution does not mention the “99 percent of cops who are professional, put their lives on the line, and serve the community admirably.” In essence, he said the “resolution’s current form…it rubs me the wrong way.”last_img read more

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The constant: Dodgers’ Rick Honeycutt may be best pitching coach in baseball

first_img“I think a lot of pitching coaches can do either one or the other,” Haren said. “They’re either good at helping you try to get guys out or the majority of the old-school pitching coaches – which I would kind of consider Rick to be – old-school pitching coaches are a lot more mechanical. They want to talk to you in the bullpen. They want to talk to you about your last start – what went right? What went wrong? Were your mechanics out of whack?“He blended a lot of that with a lot of the game-plan stuff. I think the newer school type of pitching, he’s kind of adapted to that.”No season has challenged Honeycutt’s ability to adapt more than 2016.The Dodgers used 31 pitchers this season. Fifteen started at least one game. Six pitchers made their major league debuts. Rookies started a major league high 70 games and threw 424 innings in all for the Dodgers, nearly 30 percent of the staff’s total.“Yeah, it’s obviously been different when you have that many bodies to work with,” Honeycutt said with a wry smile. “I feel like my job is to be the steady ship.”One of the rookies Honeycutt steered through the rough waters of his first big league season, Ross Stripling, said the coach “had a tremendous impact” on him.“For one, his ability to scout and stuff is really incredible,” Stripling said. “He works really hard and watches more video than anyone in this locker room. If you go to him and ask him about anyone, he’s ready to tell you how to attack him. That goes for me, Julio (Urias) – from the right or left side, he’s on the ball about knowing what to do. That’s always been baffling to me. Once I pitch to them, I move on and forget about it. He seems to be able to retain it.“There’s been a bunch of things this year that he’s really helped me with. Obviously, I wouldn’t be where I am without his help. I assume that goes for me, Julio, Jose (De Leon), Kenta (Maeda).”Honeycutt had an impact on another rookie, making his job easier – first-year manager Dave Roberts.“He was a huge part of my development this year and our relationship has become a lot closer,” Roberts said. “Just his openness and willingness to help me along the way – it’s hard to really put into words what he’s meant to me.“As a person who’s been around for so long, he’s got so much knowledge and information. To empower me as the manager to make certain decisions but also to help me along the way, infuse his input – he just really gets the balance between that. With him, there’s no ego. I’ve learned a lot from him.”Honeycutt, 62, could have left for Miami along with Mattingly or taken one of the other options that presented themselves during the Dodgers’ managerial search last fall. He acknowledges spending a difficult weekend thinking through the alternatives before opting to return to the Dodgers and ride out the changes.“I really stay in my box,” he said. “My job is to adapt to whatever. I learned a long time ago – I don’t worry about the offense. I try to coordinate when guys are going to pitch and get with the defensive guys. But I stay in my little box and that is trying to make our pitchers as good as possible.” Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error “He’s the best pitching coach in baseball,” said the man considered by most to be the best pitcher in baseball, Clayton Kershaw.“He’s very prepared. He works harder than anybody, watches more video than anybody,” Kershaw said. “He’s just very good at what he does. Talking to people who have left after they had him, you take for granted what he brings when you don’t know any different. I’m sure I do that, too.”During a 13-year career with eight teams, Dan Haren worked with at least nine pitching coaches, including a one-year stop in Los Angeles, where he gives Honeycutt credit with giving him the tools to extend his career even as his velocity decreased and his arsenal diminished.“I wouldn’t want to put any other coach down, per se. But compared to other pitching coaches I think Honey puts in probably the most work of any pitching coach I ever had,” Haren said. “He’s constantly doing scouting and watching video specific to every pitcher.”Honeycutt’s greatest asset, Haren said, is his ability to blend the two aspects of the job – being both a fixer (of pitching mechanics) and a planner (of pitching attacks).center_img LOS ANGELES >> Over the past 11 seasons, the Dodgers have gone through two ownership groups, as many bankruptcies as front-office makeovers (one each), four managers, 147 pitchers … and one pitching coach.During Rick Honeycutt’s tenure, the Dodgers’ pitching staff has the lowest ERA and WHIP in the majors, the best strikeout-to-walk ratio, the most strikeouts (including an MLB record 1,510 this season) and a host of other statistical superlatives.That is probably not a coincidence.“If you look at Dodgers teams over the past 10 years and how well they have performed on the run prevention side – being around Honey the last two years, it’s not a mystery as to why,” said Dodgers president of baseball operations Andrew Friedman, who made Honeycutt the only holdover from last year’s coaching staff when Dave Roberts replaced Don Mattingly as manager.last_img read more

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