Analysis shows new coal generation no longer economic in U.S.

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Analysis shows new coal generation no longer economic in U.S.

first_imgAnalysis shows new coal generation no longer economic in U.S. FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享S&P Global Market Intelligence ($):Wind energy is America’s overall lowest-cost source of new power generation, when not considering incentives, while solar and natural gas-fired facilities are also the cheapest options across wide swaths of the country, according to new analysis from the Energy Institute at the University of Texas at Austin.“This shows why, even in coal country, nobody is building coal,” said Joshua Rhodes, a research fellow at the Energy Institute whose recent analysis yielded roughly 20% and 40% cost declines for wind and solar, respectively, compared to a 2016 Energy Institute report on the levelized cost of electricity. “With gas and renewables in the system there’s just no room for coal anywhere.”The update almost eliminated coal from the institute’s interactive online map of lowest-cost new power sources throughout the United States and broadened the footprint of wind and solar as the least-expensive technologies in the county-by-county analysis. On an unsubsidized, levelized-cost basis, wind farms in Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma and Texas are the nation’s cheapest generation sources, with the cheapest wind in those states ranging from $46.76/MWh to around $48.85/MWh, the research found.The cheapest new gas generation, according to the University of Texas’ updated data, would be combined-cycle facilities in Idaho, Washington, Montana and Oregon at $52.50/MWh to $53.61/MWh. The lowest-cost U.S. solar farms, located in New Mexico, Arizona, Texas and Colorado, ranged from $62.79/MWh to $64.36/MWh. The only places new coal generation would be the cheapest option are three remote counties of Washington state, with levelized costs around $111/MWh. The analysis does not view new nuclear power as the most cost-effective technology anywhere in the country.While the Energy Institute’s analysis appears to bode well for the future competitiveness of wind and solar as federal tax incentives phase down, experts remain split on how the real impact may play out in the marketplace. Analysts from Bloomberg NEF, IHS Markit and Navigant Consulting, for instance, recently presented wildly diverging views on future solar capacity additions as the investment tax incentive declines for businesses and zeroes out for homeowners. IHS, the most bearish of the three on solar, also foresees a plunge in wind investment post-federal tax breaks.More ($): ‘No room for coal’: Wind, solar, gas seen as cheapest U.S. power without subsidieslast_img read more

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Dominica’s Tourism Act to be amended

first_imgLocalNews Dominica’s Tourism Act to be amended by: – February 24, 2012 Share Sharing is caring! 127 Views   no discussions Tweetcenter_img Tourism Minister Hon. Ian Douglas. Tourism Minister Ian Douglas has announced that his ministry is considering several amendments to the Tourism Act with a view to enhancing tourism standards and the quality of service provided on the island.The Tourism Regulations and Standards Act #19 governs the Tourism Industry; providing guidelines for development and enforcement of standards, licensing and certification of service providers as well as rules, regulations and offences.The Minister emphasized at a press conference on Friday the necessity for these amendments enable to the Discover Dominica Authority (DDA); which is the agency charged with the responsibilities of monitoring and enforcing the Act, the ability to enforce disciplinary measures against violators.“We’ve been looking at strengthening the DDA’s hand to enforce disciplinary action against some of the service providers that want to play outside of the rules. When you play outside the rules what you’re really doing is damaging the industry, you’re jeopardizing the ability of Dominica to compete on the regional and international markets and you’re really causing trouble in the industry. So we want to strengthen the hand of the DDA in certain aspects like the licensing fee structure.”It is instructive to note that the ministry has reviewed some of the reasons for the pull out of Carnival Victory in 2009 which caused serious economic strain on some of the stakeholders within the industry.(L:R): Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Tourism and Legal Affairs Mrs. Claudia Bellot, Tourism Minister Ian Douglas and CEO of DDA Colin Piper at Friday’s press conference.One of the reasons he alluded to was some private tour operators who tend to compete directly with the ship thus jeopardizing the ship’s ability to sell tours. The proposed amendments include a licensing fee structure, the implementation of a ticketing system for violation of the Act and an outline of the penalties for violation.Mr. Douglas explained that the implementation of a ticketing system for violators of the Act will be similar to the traffic ticketing system.This he said would essentially deal with violators in a swift and effective manner.“If we introduce a ticketing system we can bring some speed to the system so they don’t have to wait for a court date and go to a magistrate, or seek legal advice and adjournments. So it would be very much like a traffic violator who would go to the Magistrate’s Office to pay a ticket.”The punishment for these violations would range from a fine to possible disqualification of certification by the DDA. Mr. Douglas further noted that the level at which service is provided across the island must also be addressed.According to him citizens must recognize and appreciate that we are a service type industry and that the “tourism industry is all about providing quality service in everything that we do”.He is hopeful that these amendments will “tighten the industry” so it can operate at and provide the best level of service.Dominica Vibes News Share Sharelast_img read more

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Panel explores interpretation of Constitution

first_imgMembers of the panel included Professor Rebecca Brown of the USC Gould School of Law, Breck Kadaba, a J.D. candidate at the USC Gould School of Law and Alex Fullman, editor in chief of the USC Journal of Law and Society. Lee Epstein, provost professor of law and political science and Rader Family trustee chair in law, served as a moderator for the discussion.Some of the issues covered during the event included the recent health care law, super PACs and the issue of blind donations, content-based restrictions and the effect of freedom of speech on law and Prop. 8 in California, all in the context of where they stand constitutionally.The constantly debated health care law was the first issue covered. Brown covered the issue by defining Congress’ powers, which most importantly in this instance include the regulation of commerce and taxes.In her argument, Brown scrutinized the health care law from the perspective of the Constitution.“The theory objecting to this was that when you make a person buy [health care], the status of that person before the law that takes effect is not commercial at all,” Brown said.The next topic covered was money in politics, specifically focusing on super PACs and the recent Citizens United decision.Fullman said that the Supreme Court’s decision in the Citizens United case, which gave corporations the right to spend independent money wherever they please without disclosure, could be harmful to elections.“There’s a real need for disclosure. There’s a lot of dark money and that is the real threat to the integrity to our electoral system,” Fullman said.Next, law student Breck Kadaba addressed the Supreme Court’s interpretation of the right to free speech.Kadaba stressed the United States’ puritanical roots and its devotion, as both a country and a government, to the words and policies of the Constitution as the reason for many of these policies, especially the Supreme Court’s unwillingness to create a strict definition for free speech.“The court doesn’t want to be the person to come down and say, ‘Well, here’s the line,’” Kadaba said.The panelists finished the discussion with the topic of the Prop. 8 case and the constitutionality of gay marriage. Though the case has been kicked up to the Supreme Court, the justices have not yet revealed whether or not they will take the case.The main issue in the case, according to Brown, is whether prohibiting same-sex couples from marrying could be ruled as discrimination.“Every person in this country is entitled not to be grouped and treated more burdensomely than anyone else without a rational reason,” Brown said. The USC Levan Institute for Humanities and Ethics hosted a panel Monday on contemporary constitutional issues in celebration of the 225th anniversary of the signing of the U.S. constitution.Analysis · Law student Breck Kadaba (left), Journal of Law and Society editor Alex Fullman, Professor Rebecca Brown and moderator Lee Epstein tackled issues from Prop. 8 to Super PACs. – Ricardo Galvez | Daily Trojanlast_img read more

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