Former Rockets coach Kevin McHale says James Harden ‘is not a leader’

first_imgLOOK: Loisa Andalio, Ronnie Alonte unwind in Amanpulo for 3rd anniversary Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss00:50Trending Articles01:20Poe: PH needs ‘better leadership’ in traffic agencies to resolve problem01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games MOST READ Read Next Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH “But James is not a leader,” the Boston Celtics legend said in an appearance on NBA TV. “He tried being a leader last year, tried doing that stuff. I think Chris Paul is going to help him just kind of get back into just being able to hoop and play and stuff like that.”The #OpenCourt guys discuss if @CP3’s arrival will benefit @JHarden13 and the @HoustonRockets. pic.twitter.com/hT2bibHrpSFEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout— NBA TV (@NBATV) October 6, 2017 BSP sees higher prices in November, but expects stronger peso, low rice costs to put up fight South Korea defender scores 2 own goals in loss to Russia LATEST STORIES Fire hits houses in Mandaluyong Citycenter_img Fire hits houses in Mandaluyong City Nonong Araneta re-elected as PFF president Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Frontrow holds fun run to raise funds for young cancer patients  Houston Rockets guard James Harden (13). (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File)James Harden had pretty successful individual  season last year, averaging career bests in points (29.1), rebounds (8.5) and assists (11.2) while moving to the point guard position for the Houston Rockets.With the five-time NBA All-Star expected to slide back to the shooting guard position due to the arrival of Chris Paul, former Rockets head coach Kevin McHale questioned the crafty lefty’s leadership.ADVERTISEMENT McHale, who mentored Harden for three and a half seasons, said his teammates had a hard time listening to the bearded guard due to his deficiencies on the defensive end of the floor.“Look, if James tells you, ‘Chuck, you got to play better D.’ You listening to him? You got to be kidding me. I lived through it, believe me,” the coach-turned-analyst said. “Everybody in the locker room did this [hand on forehead]. Every time he mentioned defense, everybody would put their head down, like you got to be kidding me.”Still, McHale lauded his former player as “fantastic with the ball and a “great passer.”“The guy’s got phenomenal vision. Talk about vision, James can see all the passes and do everything,” he shared.  Khristian Ibarrola /raADVERTISEMENT View commentslast_img read more

Ohio State mens lacrosse preparing for tests against Syracuse Robert Morris

Out of the frying pan and into the fire is how the Ohio State men’s lacrosse team might be feeling this preseason. After traveling to powerhouse No. 5 Johns Hopkins for a scrimmage last weekend, the team is set to host a doubleheader Saturday against two more nationally respected programs, No. 12 Syracuse and Robert Morris. The upcoming doubleheader and the regular season have seen ramped-up practices for the Buckeyes, which will be looking to test out some fringe first team players in the matchups this weekend. Coach Nick Myers said he is encouraged by the team’s work ethic so far but said he wants to make sure playing time doesn’t go to some of the players’ heads. “Our motto is ‘Don’t count your reps, make your reps count,’” Myers said. “Guys who may not have got as many reps in the Hopkins game … are going to get more of a chance this weekend.” As was the case with a Jan. 20 match against Team Canada, this weekend’s doubleheader at Woody Hayes Athletic Center has sold out. The wealth of support for the team has been noticed in the locker room, too. OSU assistant coach Dave Dobbins said he thinks OSU students’ enthusiasm is going to help motivate the Buckeyes toward their lofty goal of an NCAA Tournament bid. “It’s great to have that support from the local community. It’s exciting for the guys playing in front of a home crowd,” Dobbins said. Some members of the team said they are excited to test their skills against, historically, some of the sport’s best. Senior midfielder Kevin Mack sees the matchups as a chance for the team to find out where they stand before next week’s season opener. “Syracuse is a top 10 program traditionally and Robert Morris always has a potent offense,” Mack said. “It’s just going to be a good test for us.” Like Mack, Myers said he understands even though it’s still the preseason, this match could be a good sample of what this OSU team can do. “It’s still an exhibition, but it’s an outstanding opportunity with Syracuse and Robert Morris, two very different styles of play that will really test us defensively,” Myers said. OSU starts the regular season at home against Detroit on Feb. 9. Dobbins said he can already sense the team’s excitement to start the year. “They’ve handled it well but are looking forward to the end of the preseason,” Dobbins said. “They have to strive for the season but they’ve done a nice job of it.” read more

Simeone yet to confirm Moratas signing

first_imgAtletico Madrid boss Diego Simeone remains coy on the possibility of Chelsea striker Alvaro Morata joining the club.Morata a €65m signing from Real Madrid in the summer of 2017 but has struggled to produce the goods for the London side since his move.Rumours in the Spanish press are rife Morata will join Atleti on an 18-month loan deal for a €7.5m fee, while the club will also hold a €40m option to sign the Spain international permanently.Morata played for Atleti during his youth career and while Sevilla and Barcelona have both been linked to his signature this month, a move back to the Spanish capital now appears the most likely outcome.“It has not happened yet so it is not a reality,” Simeone told reporters on Friday, as cited by Football Espana.“I will only talk about players who are at this club and if Morata does join us, then I will tell you what I think.”Gerard Pique, Neymar, BarcelonaLa Liga Betting: Match-day 4 Stuart Heath – September 14, 2019 Despite it being very early into La Liga season, both Barcelona and Real Madrid have had unprecedented starts to their campaigns. With this in…The club is considering the option of sending out Nikola Kalinic and Gelson Martins with Monaco and Arsenal the most likely destination.Los Rojiblancos are at the limit of their capped wage at €293m per annum and would be looking to balance the account.Diego Simeone provides an update on the Alvaro Morata transfer ⌚ pic.twitter.com/PbMgoLgxdM— Goal (@goal) January 25, 2019last_img read more

Empoli boss Bennacer was better than Ronaldo

first_imgAurelio Andreazzoli feels that Cristiano Ronaldo wasn’t the best player on the pitch in Empoli’s 2-1 home defeat to JuventusRonaldo’s match-winning brace secured all three points for Juventus last Saturday after falling behind due to Francesco Caputo’s opener.The Portuguese superstar was later named the Man-of-the-Match, which Empoli coach Andreazzoli strongly disagrees on.The 64-year-old instead feels the award should have gone to Algerian midfielder Ismaël Bennacer and he doesn’t even think Ronaldo’s goals were that great.“Ronaldo got man-of-the-match, but I think [Ismael] Bennacer was the best, without a doubt,” Andreazzoli told reporters on YouTube.Franck Ribery, FiorentinaFiorentina owner: “Ribery played better than Ronaldo!” Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Fiorentina owner Rocco Commisso was left gushing over Franck Ribery’s performance against Juventus, which he rates above that of even Cristiano Ronaldo’s.“Obviously he scored his goal, with a powerful shot, but Caputo’s goal was much more beautiful, both in the build-up and the finish.“He aimed for the top corner, CR7 hit it hard but he wasn’t aiming there. Then when it went in it was a beautiful goal.”18th-place Empoli will now another tricky encounter at Napoli on Friday at 20:30 (CEST) in the Serie A.last_img read more

Deliberations underway on Japans IR Implementation Bill

first_imgHaving voted into law the Basic Bill on Gambling Addiction Countermeasures late last week, Japan’s Upper House officially kicked off deliberations on the long-awaited IR Implementation Bill on Tuesday.The ruling Liberal Democratic Party and its coalition partner Komeito remain hopeful of pushing through the final piece in the country’s casino puzzle before the end of the current Diet session on 22 July, despite ongoing attempts from Japan’s opposition parties to delay passage of the IR bill. MGM, Melco, Shochiku sketch their plans for entertainment potential of Japan IRs IRs to benefit as Japan’s LDP pushes through foreign workers bill Some opponents had called on the government to halt any further discussions over the IR bill due to the devastating floods that have left 131 dead and 59 missing across the country as of Tuesday afternoon.Like last month, when senior members of the Constitutional Democratic Party of Japan alongside those from five other opposition parties expressed their opposition to House of Representatives Speaker Tadamori Oshima regarding the 32-day extension to the Diet session, those pleas fell on deaf ears.Passage of the IR Implementation Bill will open the door for Japan’s first casino resorts with three initial IR licenses to be offered. It is expected that two will be located in metropolitan areas and one in a regional location. RelatedPosts Japan set to propose members of new Casino Administration Committee this Fall Load Morelast_img read more

Central Texas Pipeline Reignites Fight Over Land Rights

first_img X 00:00 /03:59 “I had someone say the other day – ‘Just move it 70 miles south and you’ll have no problems,’” says Allen Fore, vice president of public affairs at Kinder Morgan. “Well, I assure you that someone owns property 70 miles south, and there are other concerns and issues that would present themselves on any significant reroute.”But pipeline opponents say they shouldn’t have to take the company’s word on that. They point out that in Texas there is no public process or oversight that happens before letters go out to property owners saying a pipeline’s coming.Julia Reihs/KUTLuke Ellis, a lawyer for landowners opposing the pipeline, says there’s “virtually no oversight” of for-profit companies taking land for a pipeline.If a landowner doesn’t want the pipeline, the company can use eminent domain to take the land anyway.“One of the first questions we always get from a property owner is: ‘How in the world can a private, for-profit pipeline company take my land?’” says Luke Ellis, a lawyer representing landowners, including Sansom, in their negotiations with Kinder Morgan.He says all a company has to do to claim the right to take land is fill out a form and file it with the Railroad Commission of Texas, the state’s strangely named oil and gas regulator“You and I could form an LLC tomorrow and we could start to submit a T-4 permit to the Railroad Commission saying that our LLC wants to build a private, for-profit pipeline company,” Ellis says. “There’s virtually no oversight there.”That’s something Texas has been grappling with in the courts and at the Capitol for decades. During the last several legislative sessions, lawmakers representing property owners have filed bills to overhaul the system, and the oil industry and others that use eminent domain have fought those efforts. In the end, nothing much changes.“I just think that there’s a huge coalition of … entities that take properties, that coalesce to lobby the Legislature in a way where they do not want to change the framework,” Ellis says.Emotions ‘Stirred Up’When these debates rise up, the industry usually points out that the use of eminent domain is pretty rare.Fore says the company is working with landowners to make them happy, and part of that is arriving at agreeable compensation for the land. He says the last thing the company wants are unhappy landowners.“Eminent domain is an absolute last resort and that’s not just some talking point that we came up with; that’s reality,” he says. “Because an adversarial relationship with a landowner that you cannot reach agreement with is an adversarial relationship that is going to be with you for a very long time. And that’s just not good.”But in some cases, an adversarial relationship is what happens.At the Hershey Ranch, Sansom says he wants a change in state law to create more oversight over pipeline companies. And, he says, with a new legislative session getting started not far away in Austin, the time is right.“I’m excited that it’s got people stirred up out here,” he says. “People in the Hill Country are not happy about this.”This article was originally published on http://www.kut.org/ Share Listen The quickest way there is through the Hill Country, including places like the Hershey Ranch in Gillespie County.The ranch, a 1,500-acre spread of rolling hills and weathered terraced fields, is dotted with trees, ponds and structures dating from the 1800s. If the pipeline is built underneath it, Kinder Morgan would also control about a 100-foot-wide swath of land above the pipeline to maintain it.Julia Reihs/KUTAndy Sansom says the pipeline will go “right through the heart” of his Hershey Ranch.“It will go right through the heart of the ranch,” says owner Andy Sansom.Sansom is a well-known conservationist, who once headed up the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. He’s especially upset about the pipeline because the Hershey Ranch is private conservation land, where no development is supposed to occur. But, he says, his neighbors with more traditional properties don’t want the pipeline either.“There are few parts of our state that are as iconic as the Hill Country,” he says. “It’s very clear that the people who live out here see this as an assault.”Eminent DomainThe idea that the Hill Country may be too “iconic” for this pipeline is something you can expect to hear more of as the project gets underway. Opponents have already raised concerns over the potential environmental, aesthetic and public health impacts. Kinder Morgan says it’s willing to make small adjustments to the route to accommodate landowners. But the pipeline is coming. To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Julia Reihs/KUTKinder Morgan is building a 430-mile pipeline from West Texas to the Gulf Coast. The quickest route: through the Hill Country.A fight over a pipeline is never only about the pipeline. It’s about the environment, property rights, public safety and a community’s sense of itself. Just such a fight is now brewing in the Texas Hill Country, where company Kinder Morgan plans to lay a part of its 430-mile natural gas Permian Highway Pipeline.The Houston-based company says the time is right for the project. An unprecedented drilling boom in West Texas means there’s more oil and gas coming out of the ground than companies can ship to market. The pipeline would carry natural gas to the Gulf Coast, where it can be sold domestically or exported.last_img read more

Study finds facial expressions are inherited

first_img “Before our study, it was clear that there is a component of imitation that influences facial expressions, but there was no study that compared the gestalt of facial movements of relatives in several emotions,” Peleg told PhysOrg.com. Peleg is a PhD student supervised by Professors Eviatar Nevo and Gadi Katzir at the International Graduate Center of Evolution at the Institute of Evolution, part of the University of Haifa in Israel. In the 1970s—contrary to some views of the time but in accordance with Darwin—psychologists Paul Ekman and Eibl Eibesfeldt showed that facial expressions are universal: people from different parts of the world smile when happy and frown when sad, etc. Scientists also know that individuals have unique facial expression signatures. Due to the existence of different nerves and muscles, some people will have, for example, dimples, “Duchenne” smiles (with circles under the eyes) and the ability to lift one eyebrow. Wanting to know if there might be a heritable basis for these individual signatures, Peleg et al. studied the gestalt of facial movements, seen in details such as the intensity and frequency of expressions. “Facial expressions are non-verbal communication phenotypes, meaning they are composed from genetics and environmental conditions,” said Peleg. “We decided to investigate a population of born-blind persons in order to eliminate the social influence and the effects of imitation.”In the study, the scientists video-taped 51 subjects—21 who were blind, and a total of 30 of their family members—when provoked to exhibit six emotional states: concentration, sadness, anger, disgust, joy and surprise. Next, the researchers used a classification tool to assign values (e.g. for types of movements, frequencies) to each of the subject’s expressions. After defining the values, another classification tool determined which subjects were family members. Quite convincingly, 80% of the classifications correctly identified family members when taking into account all six emotional expressions. The single emotion that received correct classification of family members when tested alone was anger at 75%. In a test comparing the family members with each other, the scientists also found that related subjects showed similar frequencies of facial expressions for the emotions of concentration, sadness and anger, but not the others. Scientists have found that family members share a facial expression “signature”—a unique form of the universal facial expressions encountered worldwide. In a rare study taking into account blind subjects, Gili Peleg, et al. have discovered that family members were identified by their facial expressions 80% of the time, giving scientific support to the observation that a child “has her Daddy’s smile.” Citation: Study finds facial expressions are inherited (2006, November 7) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2006-11-facial-inherited.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. “The hereditary influence that appeared in think-concentrate, sadness, and anger may relate to the induction of the high diversity of facial movements by these emotions, as we found in a previous study,” said Peleg. “We believe that if our study population was larger, we could get significant results even in the other three emotional states: disgust, joy and surprise.”Peleg et al. hope that finding a heritable basis for facial expression signatures may lead to discovering genes responsible for facial expressions. If so, it might be possible to develop repair mechanisms for people lacking facial expressions, such as people with autism. Much information can be communicated through a person’s facial expressions, and the scientists also wonder about their evolutionary significance.“Communication abilities have an evolutionary advantage; therefore facial expression phenotypes should be conserved,” said Peleg. “Facial expressions are important in inter-individual and hierarchical interactions of people within our own species; between different human races; between different tribes; and in animals between different species. The relationships of mother-babies; bonding of pairs; aggression interactions between individuals and so on should be very important in hierarchical situations in human and animal societies. Likewise, facial expressions should be of great importance as pre-mating isolating mechanisms between species.“The genetic basis of facial expressions is probably composed of an array of gene coding for muscle structure, bone structure and muscle innervations,” Peleg continued. “However, our results also demonstrate kinship sequences of facial expression. This could indicate genetic conservation and the existence of brain regions that control facial expressions.”Citation: Peleg, Gili, Katzir, Gadi, Peleg, Ofer, Kamara, Michal, Brodsky, Leonid, Hel-Or, Hagit, Keren, Daniel, and Nevo, Eviatar. “Hereditary family signature of facial expression.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. October 24, 2006. Vol. 103 No. 43. 15921-15926.By Lisa Zyga, Copyright 2006 PhysOrg.comlast_img read more

Mystery over apparent dearth of lithium 7 in universe deepens

first_img © 2012 Phys.org (Phys.org)—Researchers studying the cosmos have been stumped by an observation first made by Monique and François Spite of the Paris Observatory some thirty years ago; they noted that in studying the halos of older stars, that there should be more lithium 7 than there appeared to be in the universe. Since that time many studies have been conducted in trying to explain this apparent anomaly, but thus far no one has been able to come up with a reasonable explanation. And now, new research has deepened the mystery further by finding that the amount of lithium 7 in the path between us and a very young star aligns with would have been expected shortly after the Big Bang, but doesn’t take into account the creation of new amounts since that time. In their paper published in the journal Nature, Christopher Howk and colleagues suggest the discrepancy is troubling because it can’t be explained with normal astrophysics models. Journal information: Nature This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. New ideas add further mystery to why there is less lithium-7 in the universe than expected Estimates of the lithium abundance in the SMC interstellar medium and in other environments. Credit: Nature, 489, 121–123.center_img More information: Observation of interstellar lithium in the low-metallicity Small Magellanic Cloud, Nature, 489, 121–123 (06 September 2012) doi:10.1038/nature11407AbstractThe primordial abundances of light elements produced in the standard theory of Big Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) depend only on the cosmic ratio of baryons to photons, a quantity inferred from observations of the microwave background. The predicted primordial 7Li abundance is four times that measured in the atmospheres of Galactic halo stars. This discrepancy could be caused by modification of surface lithium abundances during the stars’ lifetimes or by physics beyond the Standard Model that affects early nucleosynthesis. The lithium abundance of low-metallicity gas provides an alternative constraint on the primordial abundance and cosmic evolution of lithium that is not susceptible to the in situ modifications that may affect stellar atmospheres. Here we report observations of interstellar 7Li in the low-metallicity gas of the Small Magellanic Cloud, a nearby galaxy with a quarter the Sun’s metallicity. The present-day 7Li abundance of the Small Magellanic Cloud is nearly equal to the BBN predictions, severely constraining the amount of possible subsequent enrichment of the gas by stellar and cosmic-ray nucleosynthesis. Our measurements can be reconciled with standard BBN with an extremely fine-tuned depletion of stellar Li with metallicity. They are also consistent with non-standard BBN.Press release What’s really bothering all the scientists working on the lithium problem is the fact that it’s the only element that doesn’t fit with models of how things should have come to exist right after the Big Bang. All known elements occur in amounts predicted, except for lithium 7; there’s just a third as much as theorists think there should be. In trying to understand why, researchers have looked at old stars that surround the Milky Way galaxy, low mass bosons called axions, and more recently binary stars that are believed to harbor black holes. Unfortunately, such studies have only made the problem worse by suggesting that even more lithium 7 ought to be hanging around somewhere than was predicted earlier.In this new research the team looked at one single huge young star in the Small Magellanic Cloud, or more precisely, at the spectrum measured of gas and dust through which light must travel to get from there to here, and found that the amount of lithium 7 is consistent with theories that suggest how much of the element there should have been shortly after the Big Bang, which is unsettling because scientists know that more of it should have been created between then and now. Thus, these new results only add to the mystery of where all the rest of it is, or worse, why it wasn’t created in the first place as models suggest. Citation: Mystery over apparent dearth of lithium 7 in universe deepens (2012, September 6) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-09-mystery-apparent-dearth-lithium-universe.html Explore furtherlast_img read more