Warriors’ Steph Curry breaks left hand after collision with Suns’ Baynes

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Warriors’ Steph Curry breaks left hand after collision with Suns’ Baynes

first_imgSAN FRANCISCO — Warriors guard Stephen Curry exited Wednesday’s game against the Phoenix Suns in the third quarter with a broken left hand.The Warriors confirmed the news on Twitter after performing X-rays on Curry.Three-and-a-half minutes into the quarter, Curry drove for a layup and was fouled by Suns center Aron Baynes when he fell head first into the restricted area. The 6-foot-10, 260 pound Baynes fell with him, and landed on Curry.Here’s the play where Steph Curry hurt his wrist. He …last_img read more

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Joburg property now online

first_img12 July 2005Information about property in Johannesburg is now available online.The city’s economic development unit, working with the South African Property Owners Association (Sapoa), has set up two online databases – one covering 25 business nodes across the city and the other containing information about residential property in the inner city.To view the online property maps, go to City of Johannesburg e-services and click on the map. Depending on your internet connection there may be a wait for all the map data to be retrieved.The databases are to be continuously updated and extended over a three-year period at a cost of R4-million, says Li Pernegger, programme manager for economic area regeneration in the unit.Pernegger says the business node database summarises information on 25 business nodes.“The data will provide you with a snapshot of the business node at a specific point in time and the user can also compare nodes. In future you will be able to view development trends in the nodes.”The two databases are available to members of the public free of charge.The business nodes database provides information for the property sector, with an appraisal of 25 business nodes to assess their economic prospects. It also contains a brief overview of each node, including history, node description and catchment area.In due course, says Pernegger, “we will consolidate the two into one Economic Activity Areas database that contains both erf-based and property sector-related information”.The inner city database provides detailed information on buildings in parts of the inner city, giving an idea of property values across the region, from the most expensive skyscrapers to more humble dwellings.Initially, offering information on certain parts of the central business district, Braamfontein and Newtown, it will gradually be extended to cover more parts of the city.The two databases are hosted by the city’s corporate geographical information services (CGIS). In its January sitting, the council endorsed the proposal to set up a property database jointly with Sapoa, clearing the way for the joint venture, the first such partnership in the country, to be implemented.Sapoa is the representative body of the commercial and industrial property sector in the country.Source: City of Johannesburglast_img read more

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Research to boost rooibos exports

first_imgRooibos is indigenous to the Cedarberg region, north-west of Cape Town. This is the only place in the  world where Rooibos grows naturally. (Image: SA Rooibos Council) The rooibos industry is a major employer in the Cederberg and surrounding areas. The industry is labour-intensive and provides about 4 500 jobs. (Image: SA Rooibos Council) MEDIA CONTACTS • Soekie Snyman  SA Rooibos Council   +27 21 552 8845RELATED ARTICLES • South Africa develops rooibos flavour wheel • Cookies with a cause in SA • South African olive oil is the best, study shows • Online ad help for small business • Amarula cream a global market leaderWilma den HartighThe South African Rooibos Council is participating in an international project to improve the export competitiveness of rooibos, one of the country’s most well-known products.The project is a combined effort between the SA Rooibos Council and the International Trade Centre – a joint agency of the World Trade Organisation and the UN. Funding for the project is provided by the government of The Netherlands.“We are delighted that international funders see the potential to take the rooibos product further,” says Soekie Snyman from the Rooibos Council.South Africa is the world’s only producer of rooibos, which is a unique selling point of the product. Classified as a herb, rooibos is part of the fynbos family of plants found in the Cape Floral Kingdom, one of only six recognised floral kingdoms of the world.Used mainly as tea but available in a wide variety of other products, rooibos is indigenous to the Cederberg region north-west of Cape Town and will only grow in this area. The region’s hot and dry summers, winter rainfall and coarse sandy soil provide ideal growing conditions for the hardy rooibos plant.According to the SA Rooibos Council, 72% of South African households buy rooibos tea and sales are increasing at about 5% a year. While the value of exported tea has increased by an average 26% year-on-year between 2005 and 2009, more than 90% of rooibos is exported in bulk, with little value added.In 2007 the world’s largest flavour company Givaudan named rooibos as one of the flavours to watch in its annual FlavourVision forecast. Since then, rooibos has gone from being a flavour to watch to a local and international beverage of choice.Thinking creatively about rooibosThe research initiative will help the industry to think more creatively about marketing the sought-after herb.“To sustain the growth we’ve achieved over the past 12 years we have to continue developing the domestic market as well as assess new opportunities to expand exports,” says Martin Bergh, chairman of the SA Rooibos Council.The research project will help the industry to better understand rooibos’s export potential, explore ways to increase current production, sustain jobs and boost the value of exported tea.Currently about half of the 12 000 tons of rooibos produced annually is exported, mostly to Germany. According to Snyman, Germany buys and sells the largest quantities of herbs such as rooibos. “It is the international herb trading capital of the world,” she says.Rooibos is exported to more than 30 countries. Germany, The Netherlands, Japan, the UK and US are the biggest importers.In addition to the opportunities for value adding, the rooibos industry is a major employer in the Cederberg and surrounding areas. The industry is labour-intensive and provides about 4 500 jobs.The South African government has recognised this as one of the focus areas in its Industrial Policy Action Plan – by promoting the exports of added-value rooibos products, jobs in the sector will be better protected.Taking these factors into account, the goal of the initial six-month project is to conduct an in-depth analysis of the structure and pricing of the German rooibos market. The findings will help the industry to identify new opportunities and market segments.In a statement Lilia Naas, programme manager at the International Trade Centre, explained that the research forms part of the inception phase of the project. Should the results prove encouraging, a second phase of the project would implement activities to improve the positioning of rooibos in international markets.Value adding potentialSnyman says that rooibos is a versatile product that is used extensively in the manufacture of products such as pet skincare ranges, alcoholic liqueurs, rooibos-smoked butter, salad dressings, yoghurt, jams, jellies and biscuits.Rooibos is also a favourite ingredient in experimental cuisine. At the Twelve Apostles Hotel in Cape Town, which recently made it onto the Condé Nast Traveler Magazine listing of the 80 best new hotels in the world, you can enjoy rooibos ice-cream as part of their fynbos-inspired menu.Although value adding is important, Snyman says that the main focus of the industry is still tea. “There is a growing market trend for speciality teas. In South Africa, the speciality tea market is still small, but it’s growing fast,” she says.South Africa’s unofficial national drinkBesides its sweet flavour, another reason for the increasing popularity of rooibos is the proven health benefits.The SA Rooibos Council has invested more than R2-million (US$252 000) in independent scientific research to determine the benefits of rooibos. It is funding six projects at several local universities and science councils, focusing on how rooibos can counter cancer and stress as well as the link between rooibos and exercise. A project on rooibos and obesity is also underway.A recent collaborative study by scientists at four international research facilities found the first clinical evidence that drinking rooibos tea significantly increases the antioxidant capacity in human blood, boosting the body’s natural defences.last_img read more

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Feeding Farmers Week 3 – Watson Farms, Sandusky County

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Week number three of Feeding Farmers, courtesy of AgriGold, took the Ohio Ag Net crew to Watson Farms in northern Ohio on the Sandusky-Seneca County line.The family operation is headed up by Dusten Watson. He took over in recent years after his dad Lee handed down the keys to the next generation, something he plans to do himself down the road. The farm also recently brought on the full-time employee Joe Ringholz.They’ve experienced a unique planting season. Some much needed rain this past Thursday was “a godsend.” Dusten did say that they should’ve stayed home with regard to planting on May 9th as everything put in the field that day had to be replanted.Ty Higgins talks more about the farm in the video below.last_img read more

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Enjoy your honeymoon in Mauritius

first_imgA view of the Pereybere beach, the smallest and one of the best in the islandRediscovered in the 16th century (though Arab and Malay sailors are known to have visited the island as early as the 10th century) by the Portuguese, Mauritius was uninhabited until 1598 when first the Dutch,,A view of the Pereybere beach, the smallest and one of the best in the islandRediscovered in the 16th century (though Arab and Malay sailors are known to have visited the island as early as the 10th century) by the Portuguese, Mauritius was uninhabited until 1598 when first the Dutch, then French and finally the British colonised the tiny island before it became independent in 1968.Even though the British rule lasted a relatively longer period, the French roots are more evident in the Mauritian lifestyle and people still prefer to speak Creole and French over the official English language.Right from the time when you set foot at the SSR International Airport at Plaisance, chances are that if you say you are from India, the locals, who proudly refer to the island as ‘Little India’-a moniker attributed to former Prime Minister Indira Gandhi, will give you a warmer welcome. Not surprising since over 68 per cent of Mauritians are of Indian origin whose forefathers migrated to Mauritius as indentured labourers during the British rule.Though India is seventh among top 10 nations in the Mauritius tourism pie, it contributes only a fraction to the market dominated by Europe till now. However, the Mauritian Tourism minister Nando Bodha plans to change that. He recently announced plans to attract over 100,000 Indian tourists within the next five years, more than doubling the number from the existing 49,779 (as per February 25, 2011 data). Says the minister, “Being initially frequented by honeymooners only, today we have different segment of travellers from India visiting the island.””Both Mauritius and India have a long standing historical and cultural connect. It offers the Indian travellers a perfect feel of home away from home while taking an international vacation with family, friends or spouse,” adds Bodha.Deputy director of the Mauritius Tourism Promotion Authority (MTPA) Vijaye Haulder agrees. “We speak Hindi, our culture and food habits are similar, what’s not to like,” he says.Mauritian Sega dancers on the beachThis ‘rainbow’ nation offers a blend of cultures, Indian, African, Chinese, French and British. And there’s plenty to do, from various sporting activities to visiting leisure parks, undersea walks, submarine rides to watching hundreds of dolphins accompanying your catamaran, lazing on beaches or long drives on the ‘tea route’ lined by tea estates are just a few of the excellent options. For a sublime experience visit the Belle Mare beach before the first light to view the perfect sunrise and head to Flic en Flac at dusk for the most surreal sunset you are likely to see, ever. At Vieux Grand Port, the oldest settlement in southeast Mauritius, you can see the ruins of the first Dutch fortifications. Or visit a former sugar factory at Beau Plan’s Aventure du Sucre. The museum here tells the story of sugar, the original economy booster once upon a time, and along the way covers the history of Mauritius.Have you heard of the Talipot Palm which flowers once in 60 years and withers thereafter? If you are lucky you might just see one in full bloom at the SSR Botanical Garden in Pamplemousses which also houses 500 different species of plants. With rising spending power, the Indian tourist, who tends to spend over Rs 16,000 per person per day, is increasingly being wooed by the island which relies on tourism as one of its prime sources of income. “Mauritius is an extremely popular mid-haul destination especially among the honeymoon travellers,” agrees Amal Rakeshi, Thomas Cook’s associate vice president Leisure Travel Outbound.”In the past few years it has caught up with families also. Honeymooners and families looking for a relaxing holiday with a focus on water sports look at Mauritius as an ideal destination,” adds Rakeshi. Arrivals from India, the nation’s top source for Asian tourists, went up by 26.8 per cent in 2010 to 49,779 (39,252 in 2009).In response, the authorities in the island nation are looking at new ways to woo the Indian tourist too. “We organise international golf tournaments and aim to introduce polo to attract the top segment of travellers,” says MTPA’s Haulder.Exploring the undersea world is a popular choice among touristsBodha’s ministry is also promoting the island as a wedding destination for Indians on the lookout for innovative options for this most memorable day. In the last six months MTPA has helped in organising over five big Indian weddings. “You have to give us at least a three month prior notice, we’ll take care of the rest for you,” says Haulder adding that they had to turn down half a dozen requests due to lack of time recently. The MTPA has instituted a special committee to push the wedding tourism strategy.Travelling to the island can be comparatively expensive though. It has four direct entry points from India-Delhi, Mumbai, Chennai and Bangalore, though only the Mauritian national carrier flies on this route.Rakeshi attributes the sustained interest to special deals at popular resorts which more than make up for the airfare. “Direct flights, no crime and discrimination, people of Indian origin works with travellers. It’s a mix of activities and sightseeing to families who are looking for more than relaxation. It’s the safe, easy to get around, more exotic than the Far East destination image that sells,” he says.”Good resorts with private access to nice pristine beaches, lack of Thailand-like nightlife makes it more exotic than the other beach destinations closer home,” adds Rakeshi.Whether you are the gung-ho activity seeker or looking for a romantic interlude, Mauritius offers more than you can expect to pack in on your average three- to seven-day trip. So pack your swimsuits and head for this exotic island just about seven hours by flight from India. The writer is a journalist based in Mauritius.advertisementadvertisementlast_img read more

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