Research to boost rooibos exports

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Research to boost rooibos exports

first_imgRooibos is indigenous to the Cedarberg region, north-west of Cape Town. This is the only place in the  world where Rooibos grows naturally. (Image: SA Rooibos Council) The rooibos industry is a major employer in the Cederberg and surrounding areas. The industry is labour-intensive and provides about 4 500 jobs. (Image: SA Rooibos Council) MEDIA CONTACTS • Soekie Snyman  SA Rooibos Council   +27 21 552 8845RELATED ARTICLES • South Africa develops rooibos flavour wheel • Cookies with a cause in SA • South African olive oil is the best, study shows • Online ad help for small business • Amarula cream a global market leaderWilma den HartighThe South African Rooibos Council is participating in an international project to improve the export competitiveness of rooibos, one of the country’s most well-known products.The project is a combined effort between the SA Rooibos Council and the International Trade Centre – a joint agency of the World Trade Organisation and the UN. Funding for the project is provided by the government of The Netherlands.“We are delighted that international funders see the potential to take the rooibos product further,” says Soekie Snyman from the Rooibos Council.South Africa is the world’s only producer of rooibos, which is a unique selling point of the product. Classified as a herb, rooibos is part of the fynbos family of plants found in the Cape Floral Kingdom, one of only six recognised floral kingdoms of the world.Used mainly as tea but available in a wide variety of other products, rooibos is indigenous to the Cederberg region north-west of Cape Town and will only grow in this area. The region’s hot and dry summers, winter rainfall and coarse sandy soil provide ideal growing conditions for the hardy rooibos plant.According to the SA Rooibos Council, 72% of South African households buy rooibos tea and sales are increasing at about 5% a year. While the value of exported tea has increased by an average 26% year-on-year between 2005 and 2009, more than 90% of rooibos is exported in bulk, with little value added.In 2007 the world’s largest flavour company Givaudan named rooibos as one of the flavours to watch in its annual FlavourVision forecast. Since then, rooibos has gone from being a flavour to watch to a local and international beverage of choice.Thinking creatively about rooibosThe research initiative will help the industry to think more creatively about marketing the sought-after herb.“To sustain the growth we’ve achieved over the past 12 years we have to continue developing the domestic market as well as assess new opportunities to expand exports,” says Martin Bergh, chairman of the SA Rooibos Council.The research project will help the industry to better understand rooibos’s export potential, explore ways to increase current production, sustain jobs and boost the value of exported tea.Currently about half of the 12 000 tons of rooibos produced annually is exported, mostly to Germany. According to Snyman, Germany buys and sells the largest quantities of herbs such as rooibos. “It is the international herb trading capital of the world,” she says.Rooibos is exported to more than 30 countries. Germany, The Netherlands, Japan, the UK and US are the biggest importers.In addition to the opportunities for value adding, the rooibos industry is a major employer in the Cederberg and surrounding areas. The industry is labour-intensive and provides about 4 500 jobs.The South African government has recognised this as one of the focus areas in its Industrial Policy Action Plan – by promoting the exports of added-value rooibos products, jobs in the sector will be better protected.Taking these factors into account, the goal of the initial six-month project is to conduct an in-depth analysis of the structure and pricing of the German rooibos market. The findings will help the industry to identify new opportunities and market segments.In a statement Lilia Naas, programme manager at the International Trade Centre, explained that the research forms part of the inception phase of the project. Should the results prove encouraging, a second phase of the project would implement activities to improve the positioning of rooibos in international markets.Value adding potentialSnyman says that rooibos is a versatile product that is used extensively in the manufacture of products such as pet skincare ranges, alcoholic liqueurs, rooibos-smoked butter, salad dressings, yoghurt, jams, jellies and biscuits.Rooibos is also a favourite ingredient in experimental cuisine. At the Twelve Apostles Hotel in Cape Town, which recently made it onto the Condé Nast Traveler Magazine listing of the 80 best new hotels in the world, you can enjoy rooibos ice-cream as part of their fynbos-inspired menu.Although value adding is important, Snyman says that the main focus of the industry is still tea. “There is a growing market trend for speciality teas. In South Africa, the speciality tea market is still small, but it’s growing fast,” she says.South Africa’s unofficial national drinkBesides its sweet flavour, another reason for the increasing popularity of rooibos is the proven health benefits.The SA Rooibos Council has invested more than R2-million (US$252 000) in independent scientific research to determine the benefits of rooibos. It is funding six projects at several local universities and science councils, focusing on how rooibos can counter cancer and stress as well as the link between rooibos and exercise. A project on rooibos and obesity is also underway.A recent collaborative study by scientists at four international research facilities found the first clinical evidence that drinking rooibos tea significantly increases the antioxidant capacity in human blood, boosting the body’s natural defences.last_img read more

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Northern Ohio Crops Day

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Allen Gahler, Ohio State University ExtensionNorthern Ohio Crops Day, held annually on the first Thursday in February at Ole Zim’s Wagon Shed near Gibsonburg, Ohio in Sandusky County is all set for another outstanding program that the progressive grain crop producer will not want to miss.Thursday, Feb. 7, 2019, the program will begin at 8:30 a.m. with a look at fungicide use in alfalfa led by Jason Hartschuh, Ag Educator in Crawford County. Alan Sundermeier, Ag Educator in Wood County will then provide an update on the status of palmer amaranth and waterhemp in the area along with management strategies. A discussion on temperature inversions and their impact on our spray practices will be led by OSU Extension climatologist Aaron Wilson.Greg Labarge, OSU Extension agronomic systems specialist will give an update on where we’ve been and what we’ve learned on Lake Erie, phosphorous, and water quality, and Andrew Kleinschmidt from OSU’s Ag Engineering department will present research findings on high speed planters and pinch row mitigation.Chris Zoller, Ag Educator in Tuscarawas County will lead a discussion on financial strategies and farm management in difficult economic times, and Allen Gahler, Ag Educator in Sandusky County will present local research findings from a study analyzing the use of cover crops as forages for livestock feed.CCA credits will be available. Pesticide license holders that attend the entire program will receive 3 hours of certification including all categories, and commercial credits will be available as well. Fertilizer re-certification will be covered beginning at 1:00 p.m. Registration is open at 8:00 a.m. with morning refreshments and time to visit with local sponsors, and the program beginning at 8:30. Lunch will be served by the Ole Zims staff. Sponsors include several local ag businesses, and plenty of time will be available for participants to visit their display tables. There is a $50 registration fee for the program, which includes all certification credits, and pre-registration is required by calling the Sandusky County Extension office at 419-334-6340 or by emailing Allen Gahler at gahler.2@osu.edu.last_img read more

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Cartoon: A Use Case for the iPad

first_imgAh, yup. Between the price point, the locked-down App Store approach, the spiffy design, the tech specs, the lack of camera, the lack of multitasking, the lack of phone, the cool iBook Store, the corny iBook shelves, the impending transformation of personal computing, the impending collapse of Apple stock, the green light for 3G voice-over-IP apps, the telco deals, the publisher deals, the rumor fact checks, the comparisons with Windows, the Kindle-killing, the not-Kindle-killing and the just-have-to-wait-and-see, all of the good points are taken.Okay, except maybe pointing out how disappointed cartoonists are that there’s no pressure-sensitive stylus. But That Would Be Self-Serving, so I won’t say it.I’m sure there are probably a few more sanitary-napkin jokes left waiting in the wings (Anyone joke about a Maxi model yet? They did? Bugger.) but I’d like to think I’m above that. (Addendum:Alex tells me that “wings” is also circulating as an iPad joke. God, I’m clueless about this stuff. Is there a course I can take somewhere? Or maybe an app?)All I can say is this: Dollhouse wrapped on Friday night, and I’m just about certain that even if the zombie apocalypse was brought about, not by the depradations of the Rossum Corporation, but by an iPad OS update that went horribly, horribly wrong… I’d still want one of the gorgeous damn things. Related Posts 9 Books That Make Perfect Gifts for Industry Ex… Tags:#Cartoons#web rob cottingham 4 Keys to a Kid-Safe App 5 Outdoor Activities for Beating Office Burnout More Noise to Signal. 12 Unique Gifts for the Hard-to-Shop-for People…last_img read more

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Everything You Need to Know About Exporting Video

first_imgBreak through the confusion and save yourself some time with these quick tips for great exporting video files.When it comes to exporting video, there’s a lot to learn. From bit-depths to codecs, it can all be quite intimidating for someone new to the exporting game. Instead of wasting time exporting (only to find your video pixelated or too large in size), check out this quick tutorial created by David Kong.Kong’s video covers everything you need to know about exporting in Adobe Media Encoder, which can be used to export timelines and compositions from After Effects and Premiere Pro. However, the topics covered by David apply to any other editing software, including FCPX and Avid Media Composer.The tutorial takes a very scientific look at how what various exporting terms mean, including:FormatsCodecs and WrappersAssigning PresetsUnderstanding Bit-RatesSquare vs. Anamorphic PixelsThe Benefits of Multi-Pass RenderingIf you’re  interested in learning more about codecs, check out the first part of this series in our ‘Everything You Need to Know About Codecs‘ post.This video was first shared by David Kong on his Vimeo channel. Thanks for sharing, David!Want to learn more about exporting? Check out a few of the following resources:Exporting with Alpha Channels in After EffectsExporting Finished Video from Premiere ProExporting Video with an Alpha Channel in FCPXHave any additional exporting tips?  Let us know in the comments below.last_img read more

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Odisha group starts drive to retrieve discarded flags

first_imgA group of environmental activists of Odisha’s Berhampur are engaged in retrieving national flags made of paper and plastic that have been thrown all around the city after the Republic Day celebrations.They are members of Berhampur Sabuja Bahini. “We were hurt to see our national flag thrown in garbage dumps, drains and on the roadside,” said BSB president Sibaram Panigrahy. “Many people buy paper and polythene flags to express nationalistic fervour on Republic Day. However, after a few hours, they have no hesitation in disposing of these flags in a derogatory manner,” said BSB member P. Aravind Kumar.In its bid to create awareness among the people to respect the Tricolour, the BSB started its drive to salvage the discarded flags on January 27. During the drive, which continued on Monday, the activists told the residents that the national flag is like a picture of deities and it should not be disposed of unceremoniously. The Tricolours salvaged by this group are being cleaned up and stored. “We will reuse them in future events,” said BSB secretary M. Dilip Kumar. The members of the group said they were happy to see that the use of polythene flags had gone down drastically in Berhampur in comparison to the Independence Day celebrations last year.last_img read more

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