Southland Conference Earns 12 Selections to AP FCS All-America Teams

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Southland Conference Earns 12 Selections to AP FCS All-America Teams

first_imgTHIRD TEAMOFFENSEQuarterback — Chandler Burks, junior, Kennesaw State.Running backs — De’Lance Turner, senior, Alcorn State; Detrez Newsome, senior, Western Carolina.Linemen — Skyler Phillips, senior, Idaho State; Zach Mitchler, junior, Kennesaw State; Alex Thompson, senior, Monmouth; Iosua Opeta, junior, Weber State; Ross Demmel, junior, Wofford.Tight end — Ross Dwelley, senior, San Diego.Receivers — Nathan Stewart, sophomore, Sam Houston State; Justin Watson, senior, Penn.All-purpose player — Khris Gardin, senior, North Carolina A&T.Kicker — Lorran Fonseca, junior, Nicholls. AP ReleaseFRISCO, Texas – Southland Conference football earned a total of 12 selections to the 2017 Associated Press FCS All-America Teams, the AP announced Tuesday. DEFENSELinemen — Andrew Ankrah, senior, James Madison; Jonathan Petersen, senior, San Diego; Darius Jackson, senior, Jacksonville State; P.J. Hall, senior, Sam Houston State.Linebackers — Brett Taylor, senior, Western Illinois; Darius Leonard, senor, South Carolina State; Nick DeLuca, senior, North Dakota State.Backs — Mike Basile, senior, Monmouth; George Odum, senior, Central Arkansas; Taron Johnson, senior, Weber State; Jordan Brown, senior, James Madison.Punter — Joe Zema, senior, UIW. The 2017 Associated Press FCS All-America Teams Sam Houston State and Central Arkansas lead with four spots each while Houston Baptist, UIW, McNeese and Nicholls all garnered individual selections. DEFENSELinemen — Anthony Ellis, senior, Charleston Southern; Ahmad Gooden, junior, Samford; Jaison Williams, sophomore, Austin Peay; Abdullah Anderson, senior, Bucknell.Linebackers — Matthew Oplinger, senior, Yale; Jared Farley, senior, Northern Iowa; Brandon Bryant, senior, Lafayette.Backs — Marlon Bridges, sophomore, Jacksonville State; Phillip Parham, senior, senior, Lafayette; Davontae Harris, senior, Illinois State; Rashad Robinson, junior, James Madison.Punter — Ian Berryman, junior, Western Carolina. The AP FCS All-America selections are chosen by a panel of 10 media members who cover FCS football. The total number of selections is three times as many as in 2016, when the Southland garnered four total selections across the three teams. The conference now has 188 total first team all-American selections in its history.center_img The conference landed five on the third team: Sam Houston State wide receiver Nathan Stewart, Nicholls placekicker Lorran Fonseca, Garrett Dolan of Houston Baptist and the Central Arkansas duo of defensive lineman Chris Terrell and defensive back Tremon Smith. Sam Houston State senior quarterback Jeremiah Briscoe earned second team honors, joined by UCA junior offensive lineman John Cook and junior McNeese placekicker Gunnar Raborn. The Bearkats earned two first team selections in junior wide receiver Davion Davis and senior defensive lineman P.J. Hall. Central Arkansas’ George Odum was named a first team defensive back. Senior punter Joe Zema of UIW rounded out the league’s first team honorees. SECOND TEAMOFFENSEQuarterback — Jeremiah Briscoe, senior, Sam Houston State.Running backs — Roc Thomas, senior, Jacksonville State; Zane Dudek, freshman, Yale.Linemen — Stetson Dagel, senior, South Dakota; John Cook, junior, Central Arkansas; Timon Parris, senior, Stony Brook; Ben Huss, senior, Duquesne; Matthew Schmidt, senior, Furman.Tight end — Andrew Vollert, senior, Weber State.Receivers — Neil O’Connor, junior, New Hampshire; Jaelon Acklin, senior, Western Illinois.All-purpose player — Elijah Marks, senior, Northern Arizona.Kicker — Gunnar Raborn, junior, McNeese. FIRST TEAMOFFENSEQuarterback — Chris Streveler, senior, South Dakota.Running backs — Dominick Bragalone, junior, Lehigh; Josh Mack, sophomore, Maine.Linemen — Brandon Parker, senior, North Carolina A&T; Austin Kuhnert, senior, North Dakota State; Jacob Ohnesorge, senior, South Dakota State; Aaron Stinnie, senior, James Madison; Justin Lea, senior, Jacksonville State.Tight end — Dallas Goedert, senior, South Dakota State.Receivers — Keelan Doss, junior, UC Davis; Davion Davis, junior, Sam Houston State.All-purpose player — John Santiago, junior, North Dakota.Kicker — Trey Tuttle, freshman, Weber State. DEFENSELinemen — Darin Greenfield, sophomore, South Dakota; Chris Terrell, sophomore, Central Arkansas; Ben Sorensen, senior, Sacramento State; Nick Wheeler, sophomore, Colgate.Linebackers — Garrett Dolan, senior, Houston Baptist; Thomas Costigan, junior, Bryant; Christian Rozeboom, sophomore, South Dakota State.Backs — Elijah Campbell, sophomore, Northern Iowa; Franklin McCain III, redshirt freshman, North Carolina A&T; Tremon Smith, senior, Central Arkansas; Davanta Reynolds, junior, North Carolina Central.Punter — Austin Barnard, senior, Samford.last_img read more

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Hesperos receives SBIR grant to create humanonachip model to mimic Alzheimers disease

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Aug 29 2018Hesperos, Inc., announced today the receipt of a NIH Phase I Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) National Institute on Aging (NIA) to help create a new multi-organ “human-on-a-chip” model that can realistically mimic the biology of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) and the effects of potential new therapies under realistic human physiological conditions.Hesperos founders Michael L. Shuler, Ph.D, and James J. Hickman, Ph.D., are pioneers of organ-on-a-chip technology, and their company is the first to create pumpless microfluidic multi-organ systems with fully integrated physiological functions, such as blood circulation and nerve connections.The AD model will be a three-organ system that includes brain cells (cortical neurons) and functioning liver and blood-brain-barrier constructs, as well as re-circulating blood and cerebral spinal fluid surrogates. This will enable scientists to study the body’s systemic response to any chemical introduced into the model, including how it metabolizes in the liver, and how it penetrates into the brain through the blood-brain barrier.This is important, because the toxicity of drugs can change once metabolized. In some cases, they become less effective; in others, the metabolites that are produced can cause unexpected — and sometimes dangerous — effects. Current human-based in vitro toxicity studies have only limited capacity to predict such functional changes, and that has been the demise of many potential therapeutics.”There are estimated to be 50 million people in the world with dementia — that’s more than the population of Spain, and it is projected to nearly triple by 2050. Many of the people with dementia have AD, resulting in an urgent need for new, effective treatment options for the disease,” said Hickman, Hesperos’s chief scientist and professor at the University of Central Florida’s Hybrid Systems Laboratory. “Development of a low-cost, easy-to-use system to assess drugs for AD would improve efficacy and toxicological evaluations for patient specific treatments, providing a significant benefit to the drug development community and patients.”Related StoriesComputers, games, crafting keep the aging brain sharpAI-enabled device detects if targeted chemotherapy is workingScientists discover how resistance to the chemotherapy drug 5-fluorouracil arisesHesperos scientists will make models using both healthy brain cells created from pluripotent stem cells, and cells with different mutations consistent with AD. Functional readouts of responses to drugs administered to the models will give valuable insights into both direct central nervous system effects and peripheral effects.Later phases of the project will also test long-term effects, and include real patient samples, to test its viability as a tool to inform real-time, personalized treatment decisions as part of precision medicine.”The integrated use of these pre-clinical test systems and physiologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic models provides a powerful tool for evaluating the dynamic interaction between drugs, aging biological system and disease, and will facilitate rational drug development and clinical trial design,” said Dr. Shuler, Hesperos CEO and founding Chair of the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Cornell University. Source:http://www.hesperosinc.com/last_img read more

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