Emissions force Talen to take Colstrip coal units offline

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Emissions force Talen to take Colstrip coal units offline

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Billings Gazette:Colstrip Power Plant, one of the largest electricity generators in the northwestern United States, has been shut down for at least a month because of air pollution problems, The Billings Gazette has learned.Talen Energy, which operates the plant, is trying to dispel rumors that newer portions of the four-generator power plant have been permanently shut down after failing to comply with the EPA’s Mercury and Air Toxics Standards. None of the power plant’s four units are effectively functioning currently.The details were disclosed to The Gazette in a leaked email, which was written by Colstrip Plant Manager Neil Dennehy. “There is no truth in the rumor that the units will be permanently shut down due to this issue,” Dennehy wrote.Neither Dennehy nor Talen Media Relations Manager Todd Martin responded to Gazette interview requests Tuesday. But Montana’s Department of Environmental Quality confirmed Colstrip’s shutdown over air pollution problems that began at least 28 days ago. That’s when Talen notified the state that its newer generators, Colstrip Units 3 and 4, were emitting Hazardous Air Pollutants, or HAPs, at unsafe levels.Talen shut the units down so it could figure out what went wrong. Since then, the units have fired up only for testing. On July 10, Talen informed the state that its HAPs were still too high. HAPs are pollutants that are known to cause cancer or suspected of causing cancer or other serious health problems like birth defects. The toxic ingredients include lead, cadmium, chromium and other compounds.Dennehy said in his email that Talen would not operate the units out of compliance. By coincidence, Colstrip’s two other generating units are shut down for scheduled maintenance, leaving the power plant completely nonoperational.Right now without Colstrip electricity, those utilities are buying electricity on the spot market and doing so without interruption, sometimes at prices lower than the cost of Colstrip power. All six of Colstrip’s owners own other generating facilities, ranging from hydroelectric dams to wind farms and natural gas plants.More: Colstrip Power Plant shut down to address unsafe pollution emission, scheduled maintenance Emissions force Talen to take Colstrip coal units offlinelast_img read more

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New nose grown on patient’s forehead

first_img Sharing is caring! 25 Views   no discussions Share Tweet Sharecenter_img HealthInternationalLifestylePrint New nose grown on patient’s forehead by: – September 28, 2013 Share A new nose has been grown by surgeons on a patient’s forehead, so it can be transplanted to replace his original one.Xiaolian, 22, didn’t look after his badly damaged nose following a traffic accident in August 2012.The infection corroded the cartilage of his nose, making it impossible for surgeons to fix it.They then decided to grow him a new one at a hospital in Fuzhou in Fujian province, China.It was grown by placing a skin tissue expander onto Xiaolian’s forehead, cutting it into the shape of a nose and planting cartilage taken from his ribs.A doctor checks Xiaolian’s damaged noseThe surgeons said that the new nose is in good shape and the transplant surgery could be performed soon.Mr Shehan Hettiaratchy is Chief of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at the Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust and a member of the British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons (BAPRAS).He says: “The forehead is a traditional place to get extra tissue from to rebuild a nose. The skin from there is a good match for nose skin.“Most importantly, the forehead skin can be moved to the nose and keep its blood supply, which is essential otherwise the skin would die.”BBC Newslast_img read more

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High schoolers storm USC to protest Trump

first_imgSeveral hundred middle and high schoolers from the 32nd Street School gathered on campus Thursday afternoon to protest Donald Trump’s victory in the presidential election. They were joined by USC students and faculty as they marched down Trousdale, eventually gathering near Tommy Trojan and chanting “Not our president” and “Si, se puede,” or“yes, we can” in Spanish. Many held signs proclaiming solidarity with minority groups and denouncing Trump and the Republican Party as fascist. Others held up flags from Mexico and El Salvador, expressing solidarity in reference to Trump’s claims that he would deport all 11 million undocumented immigrants currently residing in the U.S.“We are proud of our country,” one protester holding up a Salvadoran flag said in Spanish. “We want to tell Donald Trump that he cannot deport us, and that he cannot destroy us.” Students explained that seniors at the 32nd Street School collectively decided to come to USC in order to “make their voices heard.” “We’re very upset about what happened during the election and how many people were influenced by hate,” said Reginald Albert, a high school senior from the 32nd Street School. Other protestors held up the rainbow flag of the LGBT movement while many chanted “the people united will never be divided.” The group rallied in front of the Student Union, then began to disperse as some moved toward Exposition Park while others marched out onto Figueroa Street. USC students and faculty formed a “human wall” along Trousdale, then gathered around Tommy Trojan to take turns speaking about what the possibility of a Trump presidency means for them.One student said that as an undocumented immigrant, she had been taken in by a white woman who helped her eventually get to USC. She urged students to stay united against hate in the face of divisive rhetoric. “This proves that not everyone is racist,” she said. “There are good people out there.” By 1:00 p.m., the majority of the protesters had moved off campus. A group of around 200 people from USC made its way down Figueroa Street toward Downtown, where A group marched back onto campus near 2:00 p.m. yelling, “F–k Donald Trump” as they moved down Trousdale Parkway toward Tommy Trojan. Late Thursday evening, another group gathered at Tommy Trojan and marched downtown, where they assembled in front of City Hall in further protest.The Office of the Provost issued a statement Thursday evening recognizing the discontent that has spread throughout campus and saying that it would not allow “abuse, threats, harassment, intimidation or violence” targeted toward any members of the USC community. The statement, which was signed by Provost Michael Quick, Vice President for Student Affairs Ainsley Carry and Dean of Religious Life Varun Soni, urged students to report incidents of bias online or through USC’s LiveSafe app. “Given the fact that our community reflects such a profound pluralism of experiences, identities, perspectives, and beliefs, it is inevitable that we will sometimes face deep disagreements regarding fundamental issues,” the email statement said. “However, as a cherished community of scholars and artists, we have the unique opportunity and the shared responsibility to model how we engage, interrogate, and reconcile our differences with civility, respect, and empathy.”last_img read more

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Lester Holt speaks on journalism, politics

first_imgNightly News anchor Lester Holt spoke about interviewing President Donald Trump and moderating a presidential debate with Dean Willow Bay at Wallis Annenberg Hall Thursday night. Photo by Tomás Mier | Daily Trojan“See, my hand started to shake when you said that,” said NBC Nightly News anchor Lester Holt after being asked about moderating the first 2016 presidential debate at an event hosted at Wallis Annenberg Hall Thursday night.Along with analyzing clips of the debate, Holt, in conversation with Willow Bay, the dean of the Annenberg School of Communication and Journalism, spoke about politics, journalism and transparency.The two then discussed different clips of Holt moderating the first Hillary Clinton-Donald Trump debate, which Holt said he had not watched in its entirety. He explained that being the moderator was one of the most challenging things in his career.“The difficult thing was turning on cable TV and hearing people talk about me,” he said. “You think it doesn’t get into your head, but it does.”Holt spoke about interviewing Trump after he had become president — explaining how quickly Trump opened up to speak to him following the president’s firing of FBI director James Comey. He also spoke about visiting a U.S. naval base in South Korea, where he said the military is prepared for a nuclear attack from North Korea.“When you realize how many people could die, it’s quite disturbing,” he said.The conversation then opened to questions from pre-selected journalism students. Garrett Schwartz, a senior majoring in broadcast and digital journalism, asked about a journalist’s use of social media.Holt explained that social media is important to keep people informed, but that he was always cautious.“I am very guarded, because that’s what gets us in trouble,” Holt said. “When we get into the pundit world too much, we risk to fall into those traps.”Holt addressed issues of objectivity in journalism, explaining that the most important thing for a journalist is remaining objective.“You don’t just need to hold yourself accountable, but others accountable too,” Holt said. “You have to be clear with who you are.”CORRECTION: A previous version of this post incorrectly stated that Holt spoke about visiting a U.S. Naval base in North Korea. The base was in South Korea. The Daily Trojan regrets the error.last_img read more

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What channel is Georgia vs. Baylor on today? Time, TV schedule for Sugar Bowl 2020

first_imgGeorgia hopes this Sugar Bowl appearance goes better than the last one.The Bulldogs’ 2018 season finished with a decisive loss to Texas in which it trailed 28-7 early in the fourth quarter. This one will conclude with a Jan. 1 matchup against Baylor that figures to be a similarly difficult task. MORE: Georgia vs. Baylor odds, predictions, betting trendsWhat channel is Georgia vs. Baylor on today?TV channel (national): ESPNLive stream: WatchESPNGeorgia vs. Baylor is televised nationally on ESPN. Sean McDonough and Todd Blackledge will call the game from the TV booth, and Holly Rowe will offer additional reporting from the sideline.What time does the Sugar Bowl start?Date: Wednesday, Jan. 1Start time: 8:45 p.m. ETThe Sugar Bowl meeting between Georgia and Baylor starts at 8:45 p.m. ET on Wednesday, Jan. 1. The Bulldogs are 4-0 all-time against the Bears, though the schools haven’t played one another since 1989.New Year’s 6 bowl scheduleSaturday, Dec. 28BowlTeamsCotton Bowl ClassicPenn State 53, Memphis 39Peach Bowl (CFP semifinal)LSU 63, Oklahoma 28Fiesta Bowl (CFP semifinal)Clemson 29, Ohio State 23Monday, Dec. 30BowlTeamsTime (ET)TVOrange BowlFlorida vs. Virginia8 p.m.ESPNWednesday, Jan. 1BowlTeamsTime (ET)TVRose Bowl GameWisconsin vs. Oregon5 p.m.ESPNSugar BowlGeorgia vs. Baylor8:45 p.m.ESPNMonday, Jan. 13BowlTeamsTime (ET)TVCollege Football Playoff championshipLSU vs. Clemson8 p.m.ESPN Like No. 5 Georgia (11-2), No. 7 Baylor (11-2) spent much of the year in the College Football Playoff discussion. Despite falling short of that destination, claiming the Sugar Bowl would mark a successful campaign for each team and a building block for the future.Here’s a guide to everything to need to watch the Sugar Bowl matchup between Georgia and Baylor, including start time, TV channels and a full New Year’s Six bowl schedule.last_img read more

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