Daily earnings snatched from short drop hire car drivers

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Daily earnings snatched from short drop hire car drivers

first_img…as City Council turns park into vending areaHire car drivers who ply the East Bank Demerara route via Ramp Road, Ruimveldt, Georgetown have suddenly been confronted with their car park, situated in the Stabroek Market Square, being modified to temporarily facilitate vendors who have been relocated there to facilitate rehabilitation of the wharf.As such, the area has been barricaded since Tuesday, resulting in the hire car drivers being without a venue from which to operate. This publication caught up with some of the operators on Thursday, and Percival Etwaroo explained that the placement of vendors at their designated car park has seriously affected the livelihoods of over 45 operators.He noted that, on Tuesday, when the drivers entered the Stabroek area to carry out their daily routines, they were confronted by barricades preventing them from entering their parking area.“When we showed up for work on Tuesday morning, we found that the park was barricaded with metal mesh and poles. We cannot make any entry into the park. We don’t know where to operate from, and we were told that this was an act done by the Mayor and City Council,” Etwaroo said.Another driver added, “We are faced with a problem over the last few days, in thatBarricades placed along the short drop hire car parkit’s affecting our operation on a daily basis. It is affecting us very miserably because we cannot work to get money to take home to our family.”He said that prior to this incident, they were never notified of Council’s intentions to use the park to temporarily accommodate the vendors.As such, all of the affected drivers are calling on the Council to find an area which they can utilise.“We don’t know the reason for that. We were not notified in a way of a notice or any meeting or nothing whatsoever.We don’t know what is going on, and we would like to know if anybody from the Mayor and City Council can come and tell us what is going on,” another distraught driver said. Meanwhile, Alan Rahman, who shared the same sentiments stated, “I think it’s blatant disrespect, not only to the drivers, but to the families of the drivers and the passengers. This should never be. We should learn to give instructions, give notification, and do what is necessary. On top of that, we are being harassed by the Police when we drop off and pick up (passengers) because there is no designated location to pick up or to set (them) down.”The drivers have opined that since they cannot operate anymore, commuters would also be affected, since many would have to use a taxi to traverse the EBD area. This costs more money and increases their expenditure.“I think it’s a very irresponsible move, and (shows) lack of respect from the general public, not just the drivers. Doing something like that…because many persons traverse that area, and the hire car drivers are the main movement that you have across the East Bank area. A lot of drivers have been there for years operating,” Girdharie Singh said.The hire car drivers are requesting that the matter be looked into by Central Government, in order to facilitate a less impacting approach to addressing the situation.“We don’t have a problem, but you cannot take out the public transportation operators to facilitate a few market vendors. I think that a more proper approach should be done on this issue, because you can find better accommodation for the few market vendors (instead of having) to displace so many hire cars,” another driver said.The drivers are awaiting a response from City Council regarding the provision of an alternative space, so that they can continue operating at the park. Meanwhile, efforts to contact the Mayor and Town Clerk for a comment on the decision to leave the drivers out in the cold have proven futile.last_img read more

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A Lot Has Changed Since Houston Last Hosted The Super Bowl

first_imgListen 00:00 /03:25 Gail Delaughter/Houston Public MediaMetro now has three light rail lines to carry Super Bowl visitors. In 2004 it only had one.It was February 1, 2004 when Houston last hosted the Super Bowl. The thing a lot of people might remember most about it happened at halftime — Janet Jackson’s wardrobe malfunction. Millions of viewers saw it live.And there was also a streaker. He got on the field dressed in a referee’s uniform. The game itself was actually said to be one of the best in history. With only four seconds left on the clock, the New England Patriots kicked a 41-yard field goal, defeating the Carolina Panthers 32 to 29.The NFL had awarded the big game to Houston shortly after Bob McNair acquired the Texans franchise. The team started playing in 2002, back when their brand-new stadium was still called Reliant.To get the 2017 game, Houston had to really work for it. The city beat out a proposal from south Florida.Today preparations are moving ahead in the same venue, now known as NRG Stadium. The Patriots will be making a return visit to play the Atlanta Falcons.We spoke with NFL Director of Events Eric Finkelstein as he watched crews pull up the Texans logo from the end zone so they could install the Super Bowl 51 insignia.The stadium itself looks much the same, but it’s added a lot of amenities since 2004.There’s more food to choose from, a lot of it from local restaurants. There’s also stronger wi-fi to handle all the social media that wasn’t around 13 years ago.As for game day itself, Finkelstein says they’re always looking for ways to make the Super Bowl bigger and better.“There are so many different things that are happening, so many additional pieces that it’s amazing how much it’s evolved,” says Finkelstein.But the most striking difference could be what’s happening off the field, before and after the game. Metro CEO Tom Lambert remembers what it was like downtown in 2004 when he was the transit agency’s police chief. Discovery Green wasn’t built yet so the crowds converged on North Main Street.“I still recall at Texas and Main looking up at the Rice Hotel and the balcony and it was wall-to-wall people,” recalls Lambert. “And one said, oh my God, I hope the balcony stays there.”The Main Street light rail line had opened only a few weeks before and Lambert says things got so congested they had to shut it down.“Just the ability to move people, that was a concern,” adds Lambert. “And when you have that limited space and more and more people congested in that space, that’s always a concern.”Today Houston has three light rail lines, and they’re expected to carry thousands of fans. But Lambert says even with the limited service they learned a lot.“It demonstrated the carrying capacity of a rail car, where you could carry 200 people plus on a rail car,” explains Lambert. “And when you tie those two cars together you could move a lot of people in a dedicated corridor with very good frequencies.”And that’s another big difference between this Super Bowl and the one in 2004. University of Houston Professor Jason Draper does research on tourism and events. He says visitors now have better ways to get around Houston without a car.“I think it’s important with all the development around town, providing more opportunities and access to those areas, not having to depend on driving so much,” says Draper. “Or as much as in 2004 at least.”Events will be going on all week at Discovery Green, the George R. Brown Convention Center, and dozens of other venues.Experts say the city could see an economic impact of about $350 million. X To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Sharelast_img read more

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Mystery over apparent dearth of lithium 7 in universe deepens

first_img © 2012 Phys.org (Phys.org)—Researchers studying the cosmos have been stumped by an observation first made by Monique and François Spite of the Paris Observatory some thirty years ago; they noted that in studying the halos of older stars, that there should be more lithium 7 than there appeared to be in the universe. Since that time many studies have been conducted in trying to explain this apparent anomaly, but thus far no one has been able to come up with a reasonable explanation. And now, new research has deepened the mystery further by finding that the amount of lithium 7 in the path between us and a very young star aligns with would have been expected shortly after the Big Bang, but doesn’t take into account the creation of new amounts since that time. In their paper published in the journal Nature, Christopher Howk and colleagues suggest the discrepancy is troubling because it can’t be explained with normal astrophysics models. Journal information: Nature This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. New ideas add further mystery to why there is less lithium-7 in the universe than expected Estimates of the lithium abundance in the SMC interstellar medium and in other environments. Credit: Nature, 489, 121–123.center_img More information: Observation of interstellar lithium in the low-metallicity Small Magellanic Cloud, Nature, 489, 121–123 (06 September 2012) doi:10.1038/nature11407AbstractThe primordial abundances of light elements produced in the standard theory of Big Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) depend only on the cosmic ratio of baryons to photons, a quantity inferred from observations of the microwave background. The predicted primordial 7Li abundance is four times that measured in the atmospheres of Galactic halo stars. This discrepancy could be caused by modification of surface lithium abundances during the stars’ lifetimes or by physics beyond the Standard Model that affects early nucleosynthesis. The lithium abundance of low-metallicity gas provides an alternative constraint on the primordial abundance and cosmic evolution of lithium that is not susceptible to the in situ modifications that may affect stellar atmospheres. Here we report observations of interstellar 7Li in the low-metallicity gas of the Small Magellanic Cloud, a nearby galaxy with a quarter the Sun’s metallicity. The present-day 7Li abundance of the Small Magellanic Cloud is nearly equal to the BBN predictions, severely constraining the amount of possible subsequent enrichment of the gas by stellar and cosmic-ray nucleosynthesis. Our measurements can be reconciled with standard BBN with an extremely fine-tuned depletion of stellar Li with metallicity. They are also consistent with non-standard BBN.Press release What’s really bothering all the scientists working on the lithium problem is the fact that it’s the only element that doesn’t fit with models of how things should have come to exist right after the Big Bang. All known elements occur in amounts predicted, except for lithium 7; there’s just a third as much as theorists think there should be. In trying to understand why, researchers have looked at old stars that surround the Milky Way galaxy, low mass bosons called axions, and more recently binary stars that are believed to harbor black holes. Unfortunately, such studies have only made the problem worse by suggesting that even more lithium 7 ought to be hanging around somewhere than was predicted earlier.In this new research the team looked at one single huge young star in the Small Magellanic Cloud, or more precisely, at the spectrum measured of gas and dust through which light must travel to get from there to here, and found that the amount of lithium 7 is consistent with theories that suggest how much of the element there should have been shortly after the Big Bang, which is unsettling because scientists know that more of it should have been created between then and now. Thus, these new results only add to the mystery of where all the rest of it is, or worse, why it wasn’t created in the first place as models suggest. Citation: Mystery over apparent dearth of lithium 7 in universe deepens (2012, September 6) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-09-mystery-apparent-dearth-lithium-universe.html Explore furtherlast_img read more

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