Blueberry Tour.

Blueberry Tour.

first_imgMany new rabbiteye and southern highbush releases from Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina and Florida.Fruit set of rabbiteye and southern highbush using growth regulators.Mulching rates and effects on southern highbush.Applying pine bark mulch with a row mulcher.Plant establishment. Researchers with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences will be there to answer your questions throughout the tour and during the cookout. Stay as long as you like.Alapaha is 17 miles east of Tifton, Ga., on U.S. Highway 82. The research farm entrance is 2.5 miles south of Alapaha on U.S. Highway 129. Heading south, look for the UGA Blueberry Research Farm sign on the right.To learn more about the tour, call Scott NeSmith at (770) 228-7243 or Gerard Krewer at (229) 386-3410. It’s not time for blueberries yet. On May 3, however, it will be time for the Blueberry Research Farm Twilight Tour and Cookout near Alapaha, Ga.The tour will start at 5 p.m. Research and demonstration projects will show, among other things:center_img UGA CAES File Photolast_img read more

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The scorpion myth

first_imgBy April ReeseUniversity of GeorgiaLarge frontal pinchers, six pairs of eyes, eight legs, a tailtipped with a venomous stinger — sounds like a nightmare. Butit’s really just a “harmless” scorpion.A scorpion uses its front pinchers mostly as feelers because even with a dozen eyes it can’t see very well. And the venom inits stinger, which it raises threateningly above its body, is nostronger than a typical bee’s.They’re not as dangerous as they look, said Elmer Gray, andentomologist with the University of Georgia College ofAgricultural and Environmental Sciences.”Many species of scorpions are innocuous, or nonpoisonous, and produce stings that are followed by sharp pain or a burningsensation and a lump, which usually disappears with nocomplications,” he said.At least two species, Gray said, are native to Georgia: theSouthern devil (Vejovis carolinianus) and striped (Centruroides vittatus) scorpions. The former can growto 1.5 inches long, while the latter can get a bit bigger.”These scorpions aren’t considered life-threatening, althoughsome people may have … reactions such as swelling and fever,”he said. “People who have allergic reactions to bee stings may be more likely than others to have the same reactions withscorpion stings.”Although scorpion stings in Georgia aren’t normally deadly, they still hurt. And “scorpions are aggressive and will sting ifprovoked,” he said.Treating the stingGray suggests using an ice pack and pain relievers to ease the pain of a sting.”Washing the wound lessens the chances of secondary infection,” he said. “Antihistamines may help. … Calamineproducts, such as Caladryl, or corticosteroids can also beapplied if swelling is prolonged.”If you have an unusual or prolonged reaction, he said, contact a doctor.Night travelers”Scorpions are nocturnal,” Gray said, “and hide under debris,including boards, rocks, tree bark and rubbish piles during theday. They’re attracted to areas that provide shelter, moistureand their prey — mostly insects.”Scorpions don’t usually live in packs or travel in groups, soit’s rare to become infested with them. But watch out for mothers or you might wind up with more than you bargained for.”Female scorpions produce an average of 32 young,” Gray said.”The mother produces live young, which climb onto her back andremain there for five to 15 days. The young will molt in three to six days, and the typical life span for scorpions is three tofive years.”Avoiding stingsAvoiding stings is the best protection. Gray suggests ways tolimit exposure to scorpions.”Remove all debris and vegetation that are directly adjacent to a home’s foundation,” he said. “Wear gloves when moving rocksor boards around the yard. Avoid putting your hands where youreyes can’t see. And be sure to wear shoes when walking outside atnight.”Some nonchemical tactics for long-term outdoor control include: Move trash and debris.Store firewood and lumber off the ground.Remove unnecessary rocks, bricks and blocks.Install a barrier strip of gravel around the foundation of the house.Keep vegetation trimmed around the foundation of the house.Seal any openings or crevices in outside walls.Screen and weatherstrip doors, windows and vents.Repair leaky air conditioners and other outdoor water sources. Chemical treatments may be necessary, Gray said, to quicklyreduce pest populations.”A perimeter treatment focusing on potential points of entry can reduce movement into a building,” he said. You’ll get the bestresults if you apply the treatment at dusk.(April Reese is a writer with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.)last_img read more

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Bee bonanza

first_imgFor pros and newbiesClasses are designed with both veteran beekeepers and the curiousin mind. Presentations are set in two tracks, one for experiencedbeekeepers and another for beginners.This year’s participants will learn the latest research-basedinformation on Africanized honeybees from David DeJong. Aresearcher at the University of San Paulo, Brazil, DeJong is anexpert on AHBs. He’s viewed as the world authority on them.Bob Danka of the U.S. Department of Agriculture bee lab in BatonRouge, La., will also be a guest lecturer. Danka studies AHBs,Russian bees, tracheal mites, bee breeding and pollination.Kim Flottum, editor of Bee Culture magazine, UGA honeybee expertKeith Delaplane and an array of other experts will also leadworkshops. Best honey contestOne of the most popular aspects of the institute is the honeyshow. Besides a variety of honeys, the show will include beeswax,candles, photography, art and beekeeping gadgets. The show’swinners will get cash awards.The cost per person is $65 for one day or $105 for both days.Training and exams for certified or entry-level beekeepers are inthe beginners track on Friday and Saturday. Training and examsfor Certified, Journeyman, Master and Master Craftsman beekeepersand Welsh Honey Judges will be given before the institute on May18. Fees are charged for these exams.Due to space constraints, the institute is limited to 150participants. To register or learn more, call (706) 542-9035. Orgo to the institute Web site, www.ent.uga.edu/Brochure-06.pdf. By Sharon OmahenUniversity of GeorgiaThis year’s Beekeeping Institute will cover everything from honeyprocessing to bee breeding at Young Harris College May 19-20 inYoung Harris, Ga.In its 15th year, the institute is a joint venture between thecollege and the University of Georgia Department of Entomology.Over the years, it has become the most comprehensive beekeepingeducational event in the Southeast.last_img read more

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Land stewards

first_imgBy Faith PeppersUniversity of Georgia For almost 150 years, a Harris has farmed the Screven, Ga., land that’s home to Greenview Farms. This week, Gov. Sonny Perdue recognized Jonny Harris and his family for their faithful care with the second annual Governor’s Agricultural Environmental Stewardship Award.”I can’t tell you how exciting it is to see all the support for our state’s largest industry,” Perdue said in a National Agriculture Week ceremony March 20.Perdue honored five Georgia farms that use outstanding environmental practices.”It’s my pleasure to honor these farmers for their good stewardship,” he said. “Our farmers work hard to protect the environment and preserve our resources, and we’re happy to recognize these farm families for their efforts today.”Besides Harris, regional winners were David Brown of Longview Cattle Farm in Senoia, Chan Cabe of Cabe Brothers Farm in Carnesville, Glenn Waller of Waller Farm in Harrison and Don Register of Don Register Farm in Chula.Harris said the state honor “goes back to my ancestry. We’ve worked on this land for 140 years. My ancestors tried to do the right things, and we try to do the right things.”He and the other honorees showed they’re willing to make personal sacrifices to go beyond what’s required to meet environmental standards.”It has challenges,” Harris admitted. “We look at so many things we’re doing now that are the opposite of what was done before. We see the value of changing those practices and the good that comes from it. They’re expensive to do, some of them.”Harris said the U.S. Natural Resources Conservation Service and other state and federal agencies help them do some things. “But the majority of them we do essentially by ourselves,” he said. “They’re things we need to do, and with their help, we know what to do to improve the quality of our land.”Greenview Farms is divided almost equally among timber, pastures and cultivated land. They grow hay, peanuts, cotton, corn and other crops and raise beef cattle.”In 1942 my parents, Winton and Emily Harris, established what is now known as Greenview Polled Hereford Farms, Inc.,” Harris said. “My father began a Polled Hereford cattle herd, and we continue to raise Polled Herefords today. That makes Greenview Farms the oldest, continuously active Polled Hereford breeder in Georgia. Hard work and determination have helped to make this family operation a success.””Mr. Harris serves as a model farmer,” said Rita Barrow, NRCS district conservationist. “His love and concern for his land, as well as his pride in ownership, are evident as soon as you enter his property.”His land and cattle reflect his concern for conservation,” she said. “He’s actively working to limit access of his cattle to wetlands with exclusion fencing, and he’s installed a manure storage facility to help maintain water quality in Reedy Creek.”He has installed heavy-use concrete pads under hay rings and water troughs to maintain water quality and prevent soil erosion,” she said. “He regularly rotates his cattle throughout numerous paddocks to maintain soil and water quality and to provide quality forage for his cattle.”Greenville Farms uses conservation tillage on cropland to prevent erosion and maintain water quality.”He has a Forest Stewardship Plan, and he regularly thins and prescribe-burns his forest lands to maintain forest health and increase wildlife habitat,” Barrow said. “Mr. Harris treats all of his resources well and implements best-management practices in all of his farm activities.”The award is sponsored by the Governor’s Agriculture Advisory Commission. It was developed to recognize farmers in five state regions who use conservation and best-management practices day-to-day to protect and conserve natural resources. Last year’s winner, the inaugural year, was Petty’s Dairy in Chatsworth.last_img read more

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Shade garden

first_imgSome plants thrive in almost cave-like shade. Others handle light-filtered shade. It is best to check the yard for shade at different times of the day and throughout the year to see what you really have. A site can be modified with the removal of a few tree limbs.Many vines can thrive in low-light areas and add color. Common jasmine does well in almost any soil condition and can handle moderate shade. It has bright yellow blooms. Carolina jessamine is another good choice. Both vines need support such as a post or trellis. Other vines for shaded areas are honeysuckle, cross vine, trumpet vine and large flowered clematis. Most of the ivies will also do well such as Algerian ivy. Avoid invasive types such as English ivy.For areas that require small plants or ground covers, consider holly fern, lenten rose or even daylilies. Others are pachysandra, periwinkle or possibly mondo grass. Many of these are available in a variegated form, which can brighten dark areas. Ferns certainly top the list for thriving in shaded, moist areas. Whether you choose the Christmas fern, Japanese painted fern or one of the other dozens available, they are sure to provide unique interest with their delicate foliage. Ferns can range in size from a few inches across to several feet.Other moist-area selections include willow gentian. It’s a perennial that grows three feet tall with arching stems bearing ultramarine-blue trumpets in the fall.Bottlebrush buckeye is another possibility for moist shaded areas. It is a native shrub that has white bottle brush shaped flowers. This plant can reach over six feet.Oakleaf hydrangea is a large native plant with spectacular white blooms in the spring that will also survive well in moist shaded areas. This plant is best sited in areas with plenty of room. Mature plants can be eight feet tall with a 10-foot spread.When it comes to shrubs, the list includes short, tall and medium plants as well as deciduous and evergreen varieties. Azaleas and yews are popular shade-tolerant shrubs. Within the world of perennials, the best-known example is the hosta. Hardy ferns of all kinds are easy to grow. Two favorites include autumn fern and cinnamon fern, so named because of its distinctively colored new fronds.Here are a few more shade-tolerant plants:Annuals: begonia, coleus, impatiens, forget-me-nots (Myosotis sylvatica), pansy (Viola)Perennials: astilbe, bleeding heart (Dicentra), bugbane (Cimicifuga), campanula, columbine (Aquilegia), coral bells (Heuchera), foxglove (Digitalis), goatsbeard (Aruncus), hellebore, daylily (Hemerocallis), hosta, Virginia bluebell (Mertensia pulmonarioides), fern, monkshood (Aconitum), phlox, primrose (Primula), lungwort (Pulmonaria), cardinal flower (Lobelia), Siberian iris, veronicaGroundcovers: ajuga, wild ginger (Asarum), sweet woodruff (Galium odoratum), epimedium, lamium, liriope, mondo grass (Ophiopogon japonicus), pachysandra, spirea, vincaShrubs: boxwood (Buxus), daphne, gold dust (Aucuba), holly (Ilex) hydrangea, mountain laurel (Kalmia latifolia), leucothoe, Oregon grape (Mahonia), mock orange (Philadelphus), nandina, cherry laurel (Prunus laurocerasus), rhododendron and azalea, viburnum, yew (Taxus)Trees: dogwood (Cornus), Japanese maple (Acer palmatum), stewartia. (Bob Westerfield is the consumer horticulturist with the University of Georgia Cooperative Extension.) By April SorrowUniversity of GeorgiaFew things are more impressive in the landscape than large, majestic oak trees or maple trees bursting with fall color. They add dimension and needed shade in the summer, too. They also provide a challenge to a gardener looking to add color to a shaded landscape.While the list of plants for sunny locations seems to be endless, the shade gardener must be a little more selective to ensure good plant survival. Luckily, there are many plants available to enhance shadowy real estate.First, determine how much shade you have. Is it a couple of hours in the afternoon caused by a few pine trees? Is it dense shade caused by a group of magnolia trees? There is a big difference between what we call partial shade and full shade. There are also areas of shade that fall between these two categories. last_img read more

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Pecan Production

first_imgIncreased rainfall in the summer opened the door to disease and drastically lowered individual size and quantity of pecans produced in Georgia this year. Added moisture throughout the state during June, July and August led to increased cases of pecan scab disease, a fungal pathogen that thrives in environments conducive to high moisture. Scab can reduce the quality and size of pecans, and in some cases, kill the nuts.“If you go from about Ashburn south, it’s actually fairly bad with scab on susceptible varieties. If you go north from there, it’s not quite as bad, but we will see some losses state-wide” said Lenny Wells, an Extension pecan horticulturist with the University of Georgia.One of the most vulnerable varieties is the most common — Desirable. According to Wells, a large percentage of commercial orchards are planted in Desirables. However, Desirables are very susceptible to scab, as are orchards that are more likely to hold moisture, such as those in low-lying areas. “We’ve had growers that have sprayed more than they ever have for scab this year. We were seeing growers that sprayed 20 times or more this year just for scab, and that’s about twice as much as normal,” Wells said. “They’re still suffering some losses from scab.”More cases of scab result in a sharp decrease in pecan production.“When this growing season first started, it looked like (the state) had the potential for around 90 million pounds or so. I’d say now that’s probably down to 65 or 70 million pounds,” Wells said. “That’s a big drop-off.”In each of the last two years, the total poundage for pecans exceeded 100 million.Places like Dougherty County, Lee County and Mitchell County, the top three pecan-producing counties in the state, were hit especially hard by the scab disease, added Wells.Poor pecan production isn’t the only disappointing reality facing pecan growers. Prices for small growers could hover around $1 per pound due to the weak domestic market, which generally uses nuts of smaller size than the export market. Larger commercial producers, on the other hand, could get a premium price of $2.75 to $3 for their best nuts. Wells believes those prices could increase later in the pecan season if predictions of low volume hold true.“It’s going to be interesting to see this year because the volume of the crop nationwide is not there like it has been,” Wells said. “I kind of suspect as harvest progresses and we really see how short this crop is, this may be one of those years we see the price increase late in the year.”What do these prices mean for the average consumer?“I don’t think prices for the consumer will be affected so much this year because there is some supply on the shelves from last season, but supply and demand is a large part of pricing for any product. With a short pecan crop, in-store prices may go up at some point in the future,” Wells said.Pecan prices will also hinge on exports to countries like China, where demand for pecans is high.“A lot of the Chinese demand for pecans is based on the Chinese New Year. They like to eat them around that time, just like we like to eat them around Thanksgiving and Christmas. The Chinese New Year date changes from one year to the next,” Wells said. “This year it’s a little earlier, so we’ve got to get those nuts over there earlier this year. We may have a smaller window for getting them there.”The Chinese New Year is Jan. 31, 2014.According to the UGA 2011 Georgia Farm Gate Value Report, pecans were a top-10 commodity in the state, generating $319 million in farm gate value.For more information about Georgia pecans, see the website, pecan.last_img read more

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Floral Beauty

first_imgAfter a hurricane, you find beauty and pleasure in simple things. In my case, it is the old-fashioned zinnia. Now I say “old-fashioned” because we grew them from generic seed packets, so I don’t know the variety. I would say it is the zinnia you grew up with as a kid.If you are like me, zinnia was one of the first plants you grew from seeds, and you have to admit there is nothing prettier than the large flower. Over the years I have grown large amounts of Benary’s giant zinnias for cut flowers, and I can tell you that an acre of zinnias is a breathtaking site.I love zinnias in single colors and I love them in mixes. I love them in dahlia form and in those we call “cactus.” At the University of Georgia Coastal Georgia Botanical Gardens and Historic Bamboo Farm, we planted our zinnias to add a different sparkle this year, if you will, to our pollinator beds. Lest you have forgotten, zinnias bring in butterflies just like other pollinator magnets. If you haven’t tried them in a while, they may surprise you.So after Hurricane Hermine reached us as a tropical storm and Hurricane Matthew turned what seems to be the entire East Coast literally upside down, I do find pleasure in the large 4- to 5-inch-wide zinnias. They are blooming their hearts out, bringing in Gulf fritillaries and common buckeyes.You may think it’s a little late to be talking zinnias, and it is over much of the country. Zinnias are champions for a long, hot summer, but they can also be sown as succession crops all the way to fall. They partner wonderfully well with other colorful fall bloomers like mums, Mexican bush sage and asters. You will notice they bloom before and after mums, and they are downright inexpensive.Maybe the point of this article is to remind you to introduce your children to this incredibly beautiful flower next spring. This is one flower that can create a gardener in little ones. Use it to introduce children to butterflies and the pleasure of having fresh cut flowers on the table.Whether you choose a package of generic zinnias sold by color or a mix or you find Benary’s giants, Dreamland or the Magellan series, know they prefer full sun to really put on a dazzling performance. Prepare flower beds by incorporating 3 to 4 inches of organic matter and 2 pounds of a slow-release 12-6-6 fertilizer per 100 square feet of bed space. Direct seed or set out transplants with little to no color showing.Thin seedlings to around 6 to 8 inches for the vigorous growth that is about to occur. Mulch when the seedlings are large enough or after setting out transplants. Side-dress the young plants in six to eight weeks with light applications of the fertilizer.At the CGBG, we partnered zinnias with ‘Mystic Spires’ blue salvia, one of the most wonderfully persevering perennials we can grow. By doing this we have partnered the best of round flowers and spiky flowers for an unbeatable combination. I hope you will get to know zinnias again. Follow me on Twitter @CGBGgardenguru. Learn more about the CGBG at www.coastalGeorgiabg.org.last_img read more

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Brattleboro Retreat launches specialty psychiatric/addictions program for uniformed service workers

first_imgIn response to high rates of post-traumatic stress disorder, alcohol and other drug abuse, domestic violence and mental health challenges among uniformed professionals (police, fire, military, EMTs, etc.) the Brattleboro Retreat is proud to announce the opening on Tuesday, August 11 of a new 16-bed, partial hospitalization program designed specifically to meet the unique mental health and addiction treatment needs of this population. Most participants will also take advantage of the program’s residential component, which offers single and double rooms in a newly renovated property on the Retreat campus.The Retreat’s new USW program is expected to help meet the largely unmet mental health and addiction treatment needs of uniformed professionals from locations and service branches (civilian and military) across the country. It will offer a host of treatment options in a highly confidential setting.  These options include individual and group therapy, medication management and drug and alcohol support groups, mindfulness-based training, stress and anger management and other psycho-education workshops, wellness training, recreation therapy and ongoing aftercare.“With less than a handful of similar services across the country, we’ve taken great care to design a program based on proven treatment approaches such as Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction, Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, and others,” said James Bastien, director. “Our clinical staff includes individuals with personal experience in uniform—clinicians who have the experience and credibility that makes a big difference when uniformed professionals reach out for help.”To accommodate the new program, the Retreat has renovated both clinical and residential space on its campus. Participants will also have access, as needed, to the Retreat’s entire continuum of care including inpatient hospitalization and detox services—a unique feature not available elsewhere. “We are honored to be able to offer a place, and a staff, with the specialized knowledge and the credibility to help these professionals overcome their unique challenges,” added Bastien. “It’s about providing hope and healing to America’s heroes.”The Brattleboro Retreat, founded in 1834, is a not-for-profit, regional specialty psychiatric hospital and addictions treatment center, providing a full range of diagnostic, therapeutic and rehabilitation services for individuals of all ages and their families. Nationally recognized for its premiere treatment in behavioral healthcare, the Brattleboro Retreat offers a high quality, individualized, comprehensive continuum of care including inpatient, partial hospitalization, residential and outpatient treatment.Source: Brattleboro Retreat, August 11, 2009.last_img read more

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Burlington International Airport awarded $2.4 million in recovery funds

first_imgThe U.S. Department of Transportation has awarded $2,424,030 in recovery funding to the Burlington International Airport for taxiway rehabilitation and extension, Sens. Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.) and Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) and Rep. Peter Welch (D-Vt.) announced. The funding will be used to rehabilitate and repave the intersection of two taxiways and to extend a third taxiway. The projects are part of the airport’s multi-phase South End Development program, which will enhance cargo, aircraft maintenance and general aviation capabilities. Airport officials estimate the program could create as many as 350 new jobs at the airport over the next 10 years.The award is the latest federal grant made possible by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, which was signed into law in February.Leahy, Sanders and Welch said, “This federal grant will help Burlington International Airport improve its ability to serve Vermont businesses and passengers alike. Not only will it create construction jobs in the short term, it will also lead to long-term economic development through the continued improvement of the airport.”Airport director Brian Searles said, “All three members of our congressional delegation have been such great partners in the development of this airport, and this grant will help ensure that we are part of the economic recovery. We are very grateful for their work on this much needed grant”. Source: Vermont Congressional delegation. THURSDAY, August 13, 2009 —last_img read more

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ENPRO awarded emergency hazardous materials response and waste disposal contract for Vermont

first_imgNRC,ENPRO Services, Inc, a customer-focused firm specializing in the management of oil and hazardous waste, today announced that it had been awarded the Vermont Statewide Emergency Hazardous Waste Response and Waste Disposal contract by the Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTRANS). The VTRANS contract scope of work covers the provision of environmental services for state-owned property and roadways throughout Vermont, including the Interstates 89 and 91. The services ENPRO provides to the State of Vermont as part of this contract include containment, mitigation and cleanup of oil and hazardous material spills within Vermont.‘The award of this VTRANS contract calls upon ENPRO to provide safe and timely response actions to oil and hazardous material spills along state-owned roadways and properties throughout our beautiful state. ENPRO will also handle the proper disposal of hazardous and non-hazardous waste for VTRANS in accordance with state and federal regulations,’ said Jeffrey Simone, General Manager of ENPRO’s regional service center in Burlington, Vermont.‘These are the types of contracts that ENPRO relishes. Agencies like VTRANS are sophisticated buyers of environmental services; they are very selective in making contract awards, by calling out specific standards for quality and experience at competitive prices. High-profile contracts such as this one help separate ENPRO from our competitors. Such contracts reward us in the recognition of the efforts of our employees, who are out there working hard each and every day to make sure we are not only positioned to be a qualified bidder, but that we also perform admirably to maintain the contract and the repeat work that it generates,’ said David Cowie, Chief Operating Officer and an owner of ENPRO.About ENPROENPRO Services, Inc., (ENPRO) is a customer-focused firm specializing in the management of oil and hazardous waste. With over 25 years of industry experience, ENPRO serves a diverse client base from its fully equipped service centers located in Burlington, VT, Pembroke, NH, Newburyport, MA, and Portland, ME. ENPRO provides comprehensive environmental services to address virtually any project that requires the professional management of oil and hazardous waste, featuring 24-hour emergency response, waste transportation and disposal, small- and large-scale site clean-ups, technical assessments, equipment rental, and the removal and installation of petroleum/chemical distribution and storage tank systems, as well as a broad range of additional field and technical services. ENPRO is recognized throughout the Greater Northeast region for its depth of seasoned employees and their ability to complete assignments on a turnkey basis using company-owned resources.Source: Burlington, VT ‘ January 4, 2011 ‘ ENPRO Services, Inc# # #last_img read more

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