Brattleboro Retreat launches specialty psychiatric/addictions program for uniformed service workers

Brattleboro Retreat launches specialty psychiatric/addictions program for uniformed service workers

first_imgIn response to high rates of post-traumatic stress disorder, alcohol and other drug abuse, domestic violence and mental health challenges among uniformed professionals (police, fire, military, EMTs, etc.) the Brattleboro Retreat is proud to announce the opening on Tuesday, August 11 of a new 16-bed, partial hospitalization program designed specifically to meet the unique mental health and addiction treatment needs of this population. Most participants will also take advantage of the program’s residential component, which offers single and double rooms in a newly renovated property on the Retreat campus.The Retreat’s new USW program is expected to help meet the largely unmet mental health and addiction treatment needs of uniformed professionals from locations and service branches (civilian and military) across the country. It will offer a host of treatment options in a highly confidential setting.  These options include individual and group therapy, medication management and drug and alcohol support groups, mindfulness-based training, stress and anger management and other psycho-education workshops, wellness training, recreation therapy and ongoing aftercare.“With less than a handful of similar services across the country, we’ve taken great care to design a program based on proven treatment approaches such as Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction, Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, and others,” said James Bastien, director. “Our clinical staff includes individuals with personal experience in uniform—clinicians who have the experience and credibility that makes a big difference when uniformed professionals reach out for help.”To accommodate the new program, the Retreat has renovated both clinical and residential space on its campus. Participants will also have access, as needed, to the Retreat’s entire continuum of care including inpatient hospitalization and detox services—a unique feature not available elsewhere. “We are honored to be able to offer a place, and a staff, with the specialized knowledge and the credibility to help these professionals overcome their unique challenges,” added Bastien. “It’s about providing hope and healing to America’s heroes.”The Brattleboro Retreat, founded in 1834, is a not-for-profit, regional specialty psychiatric hospital and addictions treatment center, providing a full range of diagnostic, therapeutic and rehabilitation services for individuals of all ages and their families. Nationally recognized for its premiere treatment in behavioral healthcare, the Brattleboro Retreat offers a high quality, individualized, comprehensive continuum of care including inpatient, partial hospitalization, residential and outpatient treatment.Source: Brattleboro Retreat, August 11, 2009.last_img read more

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Burlington International Airport awarded $2.4 million in recovery funds

first_imgThe U.S. Department of Transportation has awarded $2,424,030 in recovery funding to the Burlington International Airport for taxiway rehabilitation and extension, Sens. Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.) and Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) and Rep. Peter Welch (D-Vt.) announced. The funding will be used to rehabilitate and repave the intersection of two taxiways and to extend a third taxiway. The projects are part of the airport’s multi-phase South End Development program, which will enhance cargo, aircraft maintenance and general aviation capabilities. Airport officials estimate the program could create as many as 350 new jobs at the airport over the next 10 years.The award is the latest federal grant made possible by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, which was signed into law in February.Leahy, Sanders and Welch said, “This federal grant will help Burlington International Airport improve its ability to serve Vermont businesses and passengers alike. Not only will it create construction jobs in the short term, it will also lead to long-term economic development through the continued improvement of the airport.”Airport director Brian Searles said, “All three members of our congressional delegation have been such great partners in the development of this airport, and this grant will help ensure that we are part of the economic recovery. We are very grateful for their work on this much needed grant”. Source: Vermont Congressional delegation. THURSDAY, August 13, 2009 —last_img read more

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ENPRO awarded emergency hazardous materials response and waste disposal contract for Vermont

first_imgNRC,ENPRO Services, Inc, a customer-focused firm specializing in the management of oil and hazardous waste, today announced that it had been awarded the Vermont Statewide Emergency Hazardous Waste Response and Waste Disposal contract by the Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTRANS). The VTRANS contract scope of work covers the provision of environmental services for state-owned property and roadways throughout Vermont, including the Interstates 89 and 91. The services ENPRO provides to the State of Vermont as part of this contract include containment, mitigation and cleanup of oil and hazardous material spills within Vermont.‘The award of this VTRANS contract calls upon ENPRO to provide safe and timely response actions to oil and hazardous material spills along state-owned roadways and properties throughout our beautiful state. ENPRO will also handle the proper disposal of hazardous and non-hazardous waste for VTRANS in accordance with state and federal regulations,’ said Jeffrey Simone, General Manager of ENPRO’s regional service center in Burlington, Vermont.‘These are the types of contracts that ENPRO relishes. Agencies like VTRANS are sophisticated buyers of environmental services; they are very selective in making contract awards, by calling out specific standards for quality and experience at competitive prices. High-profile contracts such as this one help separate ENPRO from our competitors. Such contracts reward us in the recognition of the efforts of our employees, who are out there working hard each and every day to make sure we are not only positioned to be a qualified bidder, but that we also perform admirably to maintain the contract and the repeat work that it generates,’ said David Cowie, Chief Operating Officer and an owner of ENPRO.About ENPROENPRO Services, Inc., (ENPRO) is a customer-focused firm specializing in the management of oil and hazardous waste. With over 25 years of industry experience, ENPRO serves a diverse client base from its fully equipped service centers located in Burlington, VT, Pembroke, NH, Newburyport, MA, and Portland, ME. ENPRO provides comprehensive environmental services to address virtually any project that requires the professional management of oil and hazardous waste, featuring 24-hour emergency response, waste transportation and disposal, small- and large-scale site clean-ups, technical assessments, equipment rental, and the removal and installation of petroleum/chemical distribution and storage tank systems, as well as a broad range of additional field and technical services. ENPRO is recognized throughout the Greater Northeast region for its depth of seasoned employees and their ability to complete assignments on a turnkey basis using company-owned resources.Source: Burlington, VT ‘ January 4, 2011 ‘ ENPRO Services, Inc# # #last_img read more

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Emissions force Talen to take Colstrip coal units offline

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Billings Gazette:Colstrip Power Plant, one of the largest electricity generators in the northwestern United States, has been shut down for at least a month because of air pollution problems, The Billings Gazette has learned.Talen Energy, which operates the plant, is trying to dispel rumors that newer portions of the four-generator power plant have been permanently shut down after failing to comply with the EPA’s Mercury and Air Toxics Standards. None of the power plant’s four units are effectively functioning currently.The details were disclosed to The Gazette in a leaked email, which was written by Colstrip Plant Manager Neil Dennehy. “There is no truth in the rumor that the units will be permanently shut down due to this issue,” Dennehy wrote.Neither Dennehy nor Talen Media Relations Manager Todd Martin responded to Gazette interview requests Tuesday. But Montana’s Department of Environmental Quality confirmed Colstrip’s shutdown over air pollution problems that began at least 28 days ago. That’s when Talen notified the state that its newer generators, Colstrip Units 3 and 4, were emitting Hazardous Air Pollutants, or HAPs, at unsafe levels.Talen shut the units down so it could figure out what went wrong. Since then, the units have fired up only for testing. On July 10, Talen informed the state that its HAPs were still too high. HAPs are pollutants that are known to cause cancer or suspected of causing cancer or other serious health problems like birth defects. The toxic ingredients include lead, cadmium, chromium and other compounds.Dennehy said in his email that Talen would not operate the units out of compliance. By coincidence, Colstrip’s two other generating units are shut down for scheduled maintenance, leaving the power plant completely nonoperational.Right now without Colstrip electricity, those utilities are buying electricity on the spot market and doing so without interruption, sometimes at prices lower than the cost of Colstrip power. All six of Colstrip’s owners own other generating facilities, ranging from hydroelectric dams to wind farms and natural gas plants.More: Colstrip Power Plant shut down to address unsafe pollution emission, scheduled maintenance Emissions force Talen to take Colstrip coal units offlinelast_img read more

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First U.S. utility scale offshore wind farm will cut Massachusetts customer bills by $1.4 billion

first_imgFirst U.S. utility scale offshore wind farm will cut Massachusetts customer bills by $1.4 billion FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Bloomberg News:Massachusetts electricity users will save about $1.4 billion over 20 years from the first commercial-scale offshore wind farm in the U.S.Avangrid Inc. and Copenhagen Infrastructure Partners, joint developers of the 800-megawatt project south of Martha’s Vineyard, expect to provide power and renewable energy credits for 6.5 cents a kilowatt-hour according to a letter Wednesday from the state Department of Energy Resources.That’s a levelized price in 2017 dollars over the term of the contracts, and makes the Vineyard Wind project about 18 percent cheaper than other alternatives, according to the letter. It’s also lower than the wind industry expected and shows that offshore wind can be a competitive source of clean energy as costs continue to come down.“That’s pretty shocking for us,” said Tom Harries, a wind analyst at Bloomberg NEF. “I think the wider industry expected much higher prices. The repercussions of this are it will probably awaken a lot of other coastal states to the value of offshore wind.”As prices continue to fall, offshore wind is expected to grow by 16 percent annually through 2030, driven by installations in the U.K., Germany, Netherlands and China, according to BNEF. The U.S. is a latecomer to the market, and early projects may cost more than those in Europe, in large part because developers will need to import components for the massive offshore structures, which can be as big as 600 feet (183 meters).With Vineyard Wind, the U.S. is starting to close the gap, Harries said. While offshore wind is still more costly than onshore wind and solar, it offers other advantages, notably that the turbines will generate power in the winter when prices are high.Federal tax credits and a long-term power-purchase agreement were part of the equation that helped the wind project “offer an attractive price to the benefit of consumers,” Lars Thaaning Pedersen, chief executive officer of Vineyard Wind, said in a statement.“The general consensus was that it would take a while for new markets to reach levels we’ve seen in Europe and the U.S. seems to be doing this pretty fast,” he said. More: First Big U.S. Offshore Wind Farm Offers $1.4 Billion to Customerslast_img read more

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Forecast predicts European wind capacity will hit 252GW by 2022

first_imgForecast predicts European wind capacity will hit 252GW by 2022 FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Windpower Monthly:Wind energy capacity will grow at an average 17.4GW per year up to 2022 across the continent, according to a new report by WindEurope. The trade body forecasts 86.9GW will be installed over next five years, reaching a total of 258GW in operation in Europe by 2022.Germany, Spain and the U.K. will continue to lead Europe for highest national capacity, but countries such as the Benelux nations, Norway, Turkey and France will all make important contributions to the 258GW total.Globally, Europe will account for a quarter of new total capacity additions by 2022. It also argued that with more encouraging policy frameworks in place, even more new capacity could be added in the next five years.The majority of the 86.9GW increase will be onshore, WindEurope stated in its report, Wind energy outlook in Europe: 70.4GW (81%) compared to 16.5GW (19%) of new offshore wind. Currently, onshore wind accounts for 90.7% (160.2GW) of Europe’s total installed capacity of 176.5GW, according to Windpower Intelligence, the research and data division of Windpower Monthly.Germany will remain the country with the most installed capacity, reaching 73GW in 2022, up from 59GW today. Spain (30GW by 2022, up from 23.2GW today) and the UK (26GW by 2022, up from 19.3GW today) will remain in second and third place, WindEurope stated. However, due to strong growth in other countries, Germany’s share of the new installations will fall from 40% on average over the last five years to 24%, it added.More: European capacity to exceed 250GW by 2022last_img read more

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Grid CEO: No need for federal coal, nuclear bailout

first_imgGrid CEO: No need for federal coal, nuclear bailout FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Washington Examiner:The operator of the largest power market in America released a report Thursday finding that its electricity supply would hold up against a range of threats, providing evidence against the Trump administration case for preserving coal and nuclear plants.“The PJM system is reliable today and will remain reliable into the future,” the grid operator, PJM Interconnection, said in an eight-page summary of a much-anticipated report slated for full release in December.Andrew Ott, president and CEO of PJM, amplified that assertion later Thursday during a press conference in Washington D.C. “The grid is more reliable today than it’s ever been,” Ott said.PJM covers a large territory representing 65 million people in 13 states from Illinois to Virginia.The report weighs against the Trump administration’s interest in using emergency power to keep coal and nuclear plants alive.“We think government intervention is unnecessary,” Ott said. “Nothing in our report would say there is a specific need for a specific fuel source. We are fuel neutral.”More: Largest power grid operator dismisses the threat of coal and nuclear plant closureslast_img read more

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Analysis shows new coal generation no longer economic in U.S.

first_imgAnalysis shows new coal generation no longer economic in U.S. FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享S&P Global Market Intelligence ($):Wind energy is America’s overall lowest-cost source of new power generation, when not considering incentives, while solar and natural gas-fired facilities are also the cheapest options across wide swaths of the country, according to new analysis from the Energy Institute at the University of Texas at Austin.“This shows why, even in coal country, nobody is building coal,” said Joshua Rhodes, a research fellow at the Energy Institute whose recent analysis yielded roughly 20% and 40% cost declines for wind and solar, respectively, compared to a 2016 Energy Institute report on the levelized cost of electricity. “With gas and renewables in the system there’s just no room for coal anywhere.”The update almost eliminated coal from the institute’s interactive online map of lowest-cost new power sources throughout the United States and broadened the footprint of wind and solar as the least-expensive technologies in the county-by-county analysis. On an unsubsidized, levelized-cost basis, wind farms in Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma and Texas are the nation’s cheapest generation sources, with the cheapest wind in those states ranging from $46.76/MWh to around $48.85/MWh, the research found.The cheapest new gas generation, according to the University of Texas’ updated data, would be combined-cycle facilities in Idaho, Washington, Montana and Oregon at $52.50/MWh to $53.61/MWh. The lowest-cost U.S. solar farms, located in New Mexico, Arizona, Texas and Colorado, ranged from $62.79/MWh to $64.36/MWh. The only places new coal generation would be the cheapest option are three remote counties of Washington state, with levelized costs around $111/MWh. The analysis does not view new nuclear power as the most cost-effective technology anywhere in the country.While the Energy Institute’s analysis appears to bode well for the future competitiveness of wind and solar as federal tax incentives phase down, experts remain split on how the real impact may play out in the marketplace. Analysts from Bloomberg NEF, IHS Markit and Navigant Consulting, for instance, recently presented wildly diverging views on future solar capacity additions as the investment tax incentive declines for businesses and zeroes out for homeowners. IHS, the most bearish of the three on solar, also foresees a plunge in wind investment post-federal tax breaks.More ($): ‘No room for coal’: Wind, solar, gas seen as cheapest U.S. power without subsidieslast_img read more

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Court rules EPA guidelines for coal wastewater, leachate need to be tightened

first_imgCourt rules EPA guidelines for coal wastewater, leachate need to be tightened FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享S&P Global Market Intelligence ($):A federal appeals court vacated two provisions of a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency rule requiring power plants to treat toxic waste streams because the regulations illegally relied on decades-old technology.The April 12 ruling by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 5th Circuit dealt a fresh blow to the operators of coal-fired power plants, who may now have to spend millions of dollars more to comply with the EPA’s effluent limitations guidelines for steam power plants.The court called EPA’s acknowledgment that the technology at issue is out of date a “charitable understatement” at best. “The last time these guidelines were updated was during the second year of President Reagan’s first term, the same year that saw the release of the first CD player, the Sony Watchman pocket television, and the Commodore 64 home computer,” the court recalled.The EPA finalized the effluent rule in November 2015 after conducting a three-year study that found pollution from steam-electric power plant industry is the largest source of toxic water pollution in the country. The rule required cleanup technologies for six different waste streams, including two separate classes known as leachate and legacy wastewater.Environmental and industry petitioners challenged the rule in multiple federal appeals courts and the cases were eventually consolidated before the 5th Circuit. A coalition of environmental groups including the Waterkeeper Alliance and the Sierra Club took specific aim at the EPA’s effluent limitations guidelines for leachate and legacy wastewater, arguing the agency violated the “technology-forcing” Clean Water Act by maintaining standards that had already been in place since 1982.Leachate is liquid that becomes contaminated as it percolates through or drains from a landfill or surface impoundment, while legacy wastewater encompasses wastewater from five of the streams as long as it is generated before a certain date. Instead of requiring modern chemical or biological treatment like it did for other waste streams, the EPA selected surface impoundments — or pits where wastewater sits — as the “Best Available Technology Economically Available,” or BAT, for treating leachate and legacy wastewater under the statute. In doing so, the EPA asserted that it lacked sufficient data to determine whether chemical or biological treatment would be effective on leachate and legacy wastewater. However, environmental groups contended that the EPA’s own rulemaking record refutes the notion that surface impoundments are the BAT for leachate and legacy wastewater because the agency demonstrated that impoundments are ineffective at removing toxic pollutants.More ($): Federal appeals court tosses US EPA wastewater guidelines targeting power plantslast_img read more

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Vietnam looks to tap huge offshore wind potential

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Nhȃn Dȃn:The sea from Quy Nhon to Ho Chi Minh City is considered one of the areas with the greatest potential for offshore wind power production in the world, with average wind speeds of 7-11 metres per second, experts have said.The assessment was provided at a roundtable discussion on the development of offshore wind power in Vietnam with Dutch experience, held by the Dutch Embassy in Vietnam in collaboration with the Vietnamese Ministry of Industry and Trade (MoIT) in Hanoi on April 9.Speaking at the event, Do Duc Quan, Deputy Head of the MoIT’s Electricity and Renewable Energy Authority, said that the demand for energy in Vietnam, especially electricity during 2020-2030, would be huge, as energy demand is increasing, while energy supply is and will be facing challenges, amidst traditional energy sources such as hydropower, coal, oil and gas that are gradually depleted and difficult to develop.In such context, considering the exploitation of renewable energy sources, the Vietnamese government aims to produce 10.7% of electricity from renewable sources by 2030. It targets that the total wind power capacity will reach about 1,000 MW by 2020 and 6,200 MW by 2030.Currently, Vietnam’s total installed wind power capacity is about 190MW, with four wind farms onshore and near shore with a capacity of 6 MW to 100 MW each, while an additional of 263 MW of wind power is under construction and 412 MW is in the process of appraisal approval. Approximately 4,236 MW have been approved, raising the total registered wind power capacity to 10,729 MW.With great advantages in wind power, especially the sea area from Quy Nhon city, in Binh Dinh province, to HCM City, offshore wind energy in Vietnam has yet been fully exploited. Meanwhile, the Netherlands is one of the top five countries in the world in research and development of offshore energy. The Dutch experience would be useful to Vietnam in selecting the optimal solution for the development of offshore wind power in the most appropriate way, Quan emphasised.More: Huge potential for offshore wind power development in Vietnam Vietnam looks to tap huge offshore wind potentiallast_img read more

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